2011 YRBS Results Tobacco Use

2011 YRBS Results Tobacco Use

Obesity, Overweight, and Weight Control Percentage of High School Students Who Had Obesity,* by Sex, Grade, and Race/Ethnicity, 2017 100 Percent 80 60 40 20 0 14.8 Total 17.5 Male 12.1 13.1 Female 9th 14.9 10th 16.9

11th 18.2 18.2 14.2 12th 12.5 Black Hispanic White * 95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. M > F; 11th > 9th, 11th > 12th; B > W, H > W (Based on t-test analysis, p < 0.05.) All Hispanic students are included in the Hispanic category. All other races are non-Hispanic. Note: This graph contains weighted results. National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Had Obesity,* 1999-2017 100 Percent 80 60 40 20

10.5 12.0 13.0 12.8 11.8 13.0 13.7 13.9 14.8 10.6 0 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017

* 95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. Increased 1999-2017 [Based on linear and quadratic trend analyses using logistic regression models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade (p < 0.05). Significant linear trends (if present) across all available years are described first followed by linear changes in each segment of significant quadratic trends (if present).] National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1999-2017 Range and Median Percentage of High School Students Who Had Obesity,* Across 39 States and 21 Cities, 2017 50 Percent 40 30 20 10 0 States Cities * 95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Had Obesity* 9.5% - 12.5% 12.6% - 14.1% 14.2% - 16.5% 16.6% - 21.7%

No Data 95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 cdc growth charts. in 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Were Overweight,* by Sex, Grade, and Race/Ethnicity, 2017 100 Percent 80 60 40 20 0 15.6 14.4 Total Male 16.8 15.7 16.2 16.5 Female

9th 10th 11th 14.0 12th 17.8 19.5 Black Hispanic 14.0 White * 85th percentile but <95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. F > M; B > W, H > W (Based on t-test analysis, p < 0.05.) All Hispanic students are included in the Hispanic category. All other races are non-Hispanic. Note: This graph contains weighted results. National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Were Overweight,* 1999-2017 100 Percent 80

60 40 20 14.1 13.6 14.7 15.6 15.6 15.6 15.2 16.6 16.0 15.6 0 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013

2015 2017 * 85th percentile but <95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. Increased 1999-2017 [Based on linear and quadratic trend analyses using logistic regression models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade (p < 0.05). Significant linear trends (if present) across all available years are described first followed by linear changes in each segment of significant quadratic trends (if present).] National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1999-2017 Range and Median Percentage of High School Students Who Were Overweight,* Across 39 States and 21 Cities, 2017 50 Percent 40 30 20 10 0 States Cities * 85th percentile but <95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 CDC growth charts. In 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017

Percentage of High School Students Who Were Overweight* 12.3% - 14.6% 14.7% - 15.8% 15.9% - 16.3% 16.4% - 18.3% No Data 85th percentile but <95th percentile for body mass index, based on sex- and age-specific reference data from the 2000 cdc growth charts. in 2017, new, slightly different ranges were used to calculate biologically implausible responses to height and weight questions. State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Described Themselves As Slightly or Very Overweight, by Sex,* Grade,* and Race/Ethnicity,* 2017 100 Percent 80 60 37.5 40 31.5 33.8 30.5 29.7 9th 10th

37.1 32.3 29.9 28.1 25.3 20 0 Total Male Female 11th 12th Black Hispanic White F > M; 11th > 9th, 11th > 10th; H > B, H > W (Based on t-test analysis, p < 0.05.) All Hispanic students are included in the Hispanic category. All other races are non-Hispanic. Note: This graph contains weighted results. * National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Described Themselves As Slightly or Very Overweight, 1991-2017* 100 Percent

80 60 40 31.8 34.3 27.6 27.3 1995 1997 30.0 29.2 29.6 1999 2001 2003 31.5 29.3 27.7 29.2 2007 2009

2011 31.1 31.5 31.5 2013 2015 2017 20 0 1991 1993 2005 Decreased 1991-1995, increased 1995-2017 [Based on linear and quadratic trend analyses using logistic regression models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade (p < 0.05). Significant linear trends (if present) across all available years are described first followed by linear changes in each segment of significant quadratic trends (if present).] * National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1991-2017 Range and Median Percentage of High School Students Who Described Themselves As Slightly or Very Overweight, Across 30 States and 19 Cities, 2017 50 Percent 40 30

20 10 0 States Cities State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Described Themselves As Slightly or Very Overweight 25.5% - 29.2% 29.3% - 30.6% 30.7% - 32.0% 32.1% - 35.9% No Data State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Were Trying to Lose Weight, by Sex,* Grade, and Race/Ethnicity,* 2017 100 Percent 80 59.9 60 55.4 47.1 40

46.2 46.3 9th 10th 48.6 47.8 45.1 42.3 34.0 20 0 Total Male Female 11th 12th Black Hispanic White F > M; H > B, H > W (Based on t-test analysis, p < 0.05.) All Hispanic students are included in the Hispanic category. All other races are non-Hispanic. Note: This graph contains weighted results.

* National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Were Trying to Lose Weight, 1991-2017* 100 Percent 80 60 41.8 40.3 41.4 39.7 1993 1995 1997 40 42.7 46.0 43.8 45.6 45.2

44.4 46.0 47.7 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 45.6 47.1 2015 2017 20 0 1991 1999 2001 2003 Increased 1991-2017 [Based on linear and quadratic trend analyses using logistic regression models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade (p < 0.05). Significant linear trends (if present) across all available years are described first followed by linear changes in each segment of significant quadratic trends (if present).] * National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1991-2017

Range and Median Percentage of High School Students Who Were Trying to Lose Weight, Across 29 States and 18 Cities, 2017 100 Percent 80 60 40 20 0 States Cities State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017 Percentage of High School Students Who Were Trying to Lose Weight 41.1% - 43.0% 43.1% - 44.7% 44.8% - 46.9% 47.0% - 52.3% No Data State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2017

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