A few tips!

A few tips!

The Leadership and Learning Center Name of School Leader Evaluation in Floridas Charter Schools An Overview: FCPCS School-Based Administrator Evaluation Model What do we

need to know about educator evaluation in charter schools? Purpose of Evaluation For the purpose of increasing student learning growth by improving the quality of instructional, administrative,

and supervisory services in the public schools of the state, the district school superintendent shall establish procedures for evaluating the performance of duties and responsibilities of all instructional, administrative, and supervisory personnel employed by the school district. Florida Statutes Section 1012.34 (1) (a).

This New Approach to Evaluation Supports three processes: Self-Reflection by the teacher on current proficiencies and growth needs. (What am I good at? What can I do better?) Feedback from the evaluator and others on what needs improvement. An annual summative evaluation that assigns one

of the performance levels required by law (i.e., Highly Effective, Effective, Needs Improvement / Developing, or Unsatisfactory). Student Learning Leader & Teacher Performance Objectives for Today Examine foundational statutes and rules

related to leader evaluation systems FPLS Florida Principal Leadership Standards FEAPs Florida Educator Accomplished Practices Common Language High Effect Size Practices MTSS Multiple Tiered System of Supports Review the requirements in the evaluation Objectives for Today Discuss the timelines and logistics for

implementation of the system Examine and discuss the additional metric: professional growth Discuss and understand performance metrics Value-added measure Leadership practice Todays Agenda Part I: Foundational Information

Part II: Rationale & Requirements Part III: Contemporary Research Part IV: The FCPCS SchoolBased Administrator Evaluation Model Part V: Logistics & Support Foundational Information Rewards states leading

the way in comprehensive, coherent, statewide education reform across four key areas: 1. Adopting standards and assessments that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace 2. Building data systems that measure student growth and success, and inform teachers and principals how to improve instruction 3. Recruiting, developing, rewarding, and retaining effective teachers and principals, especially where they are needed most

4. Turning around their lowest-performing schools. Florida worked diligently to bring together broad statewide support from superintendents, school board members, teachers and teacher associations for the Race to the Top application. Senate Bill 736: Student Success Act

SB 736 Requires DOE approve school district evaluation systems & monitor for compliance DOE provide requirements and criteria for evaluation systems Charter schools comply with provisions related to performance evaluations

SB 736 Requires District evaluation systems Support effective instruction & student learning growth Provide appropriate instruments, procedures, and criteria for continuous improvement Use data from multiple sources including input from parents SB 736 Requires

Four levels of performance (highly effective, effective, *needs improvement, unsatisfactory) At least **50% of the evaluation is based on student learning growth Based on contemporary research Indicators based on each of the FEAPS SB 736 Requires DOE annual reports to the public

on performance ratings including the percent of teachers and leaders receiving each rating School reports to parents when their childs teacher or principal has received unsatisfactory ratings for two consecutive years SB 736 Requires The state Board of Education shall adopt rules to establish

uniform procedures for the submission and approval of evaluations of teachers and leaders. SBE Rule 6A-5.065 The Educator Accomplished Practices Florida's core standards for effective educators. The Educator Accomplished Practices are based upon

three (3) foundational principles; high expectations, knowledge of subject matter and the standards of the profession. Each effective educator applies the foundational principles through six (6) Educator Accomplished Practices. Each of the practices is clearly defined to promote a common language and statewide understanding of the expectations for the quality of instruction and professional responsibility. Rationale & Requirements

What all school leaders need to know about the FPLS SBE Rule 6A-5.080 Florida Principal Leadership Standards Floridas core expectations for

effective school administrators They represent skill sets and knowledge bases needed in effective schools Why New Two of the most comprehensive studies on educational leadership were completed in the last three years 20092011 Significant aspects of this contemporary research were absent within the 2005 FPLS (e.g., instructional leadership, feedback, cause and effect)

Core expectations for what effective school leaders know and are able to do are considerably different than in 2005 when Florida adopted the previous standards Development of the Collaborative statewide process engaging a broad crosssection of stakeholders Extensive opportunities for public review and input 2005 FPLS informed by historical patterns of what principals jobs entailed 2011 FPLS informed by gap analyses comparing issues in the 2005 standards to contemporary leadership research and

practitioners input on best practice 2011 FPLS are modeled after the 2010 FEAPs adding clarifying and defining descriptors to address gaps in the 2005 standards The 10 Florida Principal Leadership Standards The FPLS:

Sample Standard Standard 2: Student Learning as a Priority. Effective school leaders demonstrate that student learning is their top priority through leadership actions that build and support a learning organization focused on student success . The leader: a. Enables faculty and staffto work as a system focused on student learning; b. Maintains a school climate that supports student engagement in learning; c. Generates high expectations for learning growth by all students; and d. Engages faculty and staffin efforts to close learning performance gaps among student subgroups within the scho ol.

Unwrapping Example Standard 2: Student Learning as a Priority. Effective school leaders demonstrate that student learning is their top priority through leadership actions that build and support a learning organization focused on student success . The leader: a. Enables faculty and staffto work as a system focused on student learning; b. Maintains a school climate that supports student engagement in learning; c. Generates high expectations for learning growth by all students; and d. Engages faculty and staffin efforts to close learning performance gaps among student subgroups within the scho ol.

The Florida Principal Leadership Standards Form the foundation for school leader: Personnel evaluations

Professional development Preparation programs Certification requirements Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) Common Language of Instruction The Common Language Project is a

process to refine conversations in ways that increase the clarity of exchanges and deepen common understanding of the work in progress. ADMR TM (p.40) Common Language

a tool of master practitioners in any profession that is used to facilitate effective communications about the essential concepts and practices of the profession. High-Effect Size Practices Contemporary research reveals a core of instructional and

leadership strategies that have a higher probability than most of positively impacting student learning in significant ways. High-Effect Size Strategies Are components within the core standards and expectations described in the FEAPs (Rule 6A5.065, F.A.C.) and FPLS (Rule 6A-5.080, F.A.C.) and Constitute priority issues for faculty development and deliberate practice. A listing of these high effect size strategies will be posted for district use on

www.fldoe.org/profdev/pa.asp. Contemporary Research Research frameworks pre-approved by the Department are: - Based on contemporary research - Aligned with the

Senate Bill 736, the FEAPs or FPLS, as appropriate The FPLS Reflected In Contemporary Research Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York: Routledge. Horng, E., Klasik, D., & Loeb, S. (2010). Principals time use and school effectiveness. Stanford University.

Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2010). The truth about leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Louis, K. S., Leithwood, K., Wahlstrom, K. L., & Anderson, S. E. (2010). Investigating the links to improved student learning. The Wallace Foundation. Robinson, V. M. J. (2011). Student-centered leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. ___Charter School Evaluation Model FCPCS School-Based

Administrator Evaluation Model Structure of the Model Professional Grow th FCPCS School-Based Administrator Evaluation Model 4 Domains

10 Standards 50 Indicators Florida Performance Ratings Performance levels for summative rating must conform to the requirements of Section 1012.34, F.S. Highly Effective (HE) Effective (E) Needs Improvement (NI) Unsatisfactory (U)

No developing for administrators School-Based Administrator Evaluation Rubric Unsatisfactory 1 Needs Improvement 2

Effective 3 Highly Effective 4 Performance Ratings and Associated Scores Total Score 3.6 4.0

3.0 3.5 2.0 2.9 1.0 1.9 Performance Rating Highly Effective Effective Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory Leadership Practice Score Formula

Domains 1-3 80% Professional & Ethical Behavior Domain 4 20% =

Leadership Practice Score 4 Domains 10 Standards 50 Indicators Summative Performance Score Overall Performance Score Formula

Student Growth Measure 50% Leadership Practice Score 50% =

Overall Performance Score Performance Assessment Planning Administrators meet with their evaluators at the beginning of the year to analyze data and develop a plan with annual measurable performance goals.

Interim review dates with evaluators are decided and will consist of discussion and reflection to monitor progress toward the goal using formal and/or informal data. At the end of the year, a final review is held to examine student data, evidence of attainment on the goals, and areas for continued growth are also discussed.

Student Growth Measure? The Student Success Act requires the inclusion of student learning growth measures in teacher evaluations, and it tasks the education commissioner with identifying and implementing student growth models.

The Value-Added Model (VAM) Value-added is a statistical model that uses student-level growth scores to differentiate a leaders performance in the area of student learning growth. The Value-Added Model (VAM)

A students predicted performance serves as the target. A student who meets or exceeds his target has a positive impact on the leaders evaluation, and a student not making his target has a negative impact. The Value-Added Model (VAM)

The percent of students whose performance is equal to or higher than predicted forms the foundation for the student growth score in the evaluation system. VAM Scores Students who

fall below their expected performance level Students who meet their expected performance level

Students who exceed their expected performance level The Value-Added Model (VAM) This overall percent is transferred to a scale which provides a rating for the

administrator at highly effective, effective, needs improvement, or unsatisfactory. Floridas Value Added Model Recorded Webinar for Charter Schools with Kathy Hebda, Deputy Chancellor for Education Quality, and Adam Miller, Charter Schools Director,

on the Florida Value-Added Model (VAM) is available at http://www.floridaschoolchoice.org/Information/Charter_Schools/ (bottom of page). This presentation provides an overview of Floridas ValueAdded Model and how it should be used for teacher evaluations. Logistics How will the system work? FCPCS School-Based Administrator Evaluation Model

The charter school governing board facilitates the administrator evaluation process. The School Site Monitoring Tool Recommendations for Evaluators Using the Tool 1. Record observations during school visits and provide

meaningful feedback in post-observation conferences 2. Conduct a minimum of one site visit per grading period, but as many as possible are suggested 3. Use the tool to assess all domains, or assess specific targeted domains during each visit 4. After each visit, discuss positive practices and areas that need improvement. Share suggestions and support 5. Conduct a follow-up visit to review areas for improvement 6. After each visit, school-based administrator and evaluator sign the tool

Evaluation Process Overview Step 1: Orientation Step 7: Year-end Meeting Between Evaluatee and Evaluator Step 2: PreEvaluation Planning

Improved Leadership Performance Step 3: Initial Step 6: Prepare A Consolidated Performance Assessment Meeting Between Evaluatee and Evaluator

Step 5: Mid-Year Evaluation Between Evaluatee and Evaluator Step 4: Monitoring, Data Collection, and Application to Practice

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