BLOG: Probabilistic Models with Unknown Objects

BLOG: Probabilistic Models with Unknown Objects

First-Order Probabilistic Languages: Into the Unknown Brian Milch and Stuart Russell University of California at Berkeley, USA August 27, 2006 Based on joint work with Bhaskara Marthi, David Sontag, Andrey Kolobov, Daniel L. Ong Knowledge Representation probabilistic histogram 17th18th centuries Probabilistic logic [Nilsson 1986], Graphical models late 20th century Boolean logic 19th century

deterministic atomic propositional First-order probabilistic languages (FOPLs) 20th-21st centuries First-order logic 19th - early 20th century first-order First-Order Probabilistic Languages (FOPLs) Probabilistic Horn Abduction Probabilistic Logic Programs ProbLog Probabilistic Entity-Relationship Models Markov Logic Networks

Relational Bayes Nets IBAL Bayesian Logic Programs Multi-Entity Bayes Nets PRISM Object-Oriented Bayes Nets BUGS/Plates Relational Markov Networks Probabilistic Relational Models Stochastic Logic Programs Logical Bayesian Networks SPOOK Bayesian Logic Logic Programs with Annotated Disjunctions

This Talk Taxonomy of FOPLs Design of a FOPL: Bayesian logic (BLOG) Inference in infinite Bayes nets Open problems in structure learning Motivating Problem: Bibliographies Russell, Stuart and Norvig, Peter. Articial Intelligence. Prentice-Hall, 1995. S. Russel and P. Norvig (1995). Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Pedagogical Example Researchers Brilliant(res) res = AuthorOf(pub)

Publications Tasks: Infer who is brilliant Predict paper acceptances Infer who wrote a paper Accepted(pub) Relational Structures Possible worlds are relational structures Set of objects e.g., {Jones, Pub1, Pub2} Relations and functions defined on the objects e.g., AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Jones), (Pub2, Jones)} Brilliant = {(Jones)} Accepted = {(Pub2)} Also known as: logical models / interpretations, relational databases How can we define probability distributions over relational structures?

Taxonomy of FOPLs, first level Outcome Space Proofs (and hence logical atoms) SLPs Relational structures [Muggleton 1996] First-order interpretations PHA [Poole 1992] RBNs [Jaeger 1997] PRISM [Sato 1997] MLNs [Domingos & Richardson 2004] BLOG [Milch et al. 2004] ...

Relational databases PRMs [Koller & Pfeffer 1998] RMNs [Taskar et al. 2002] DAPER models [Heckerman et al. 2004] Instantiations of random variables Early KBMC BUGS/Plates [Gilks et al. 1994] BLPs [Kersting & De Raedt 2001]

Nested data structures IBAL [Pfeffer 2001] Full Specification versus Constraints Relational Structures Specificity Model specifies constraints on distribution e.g., x P(Brilliant(x)) = 0.3 Halperns logic of probability [1990] PLP [Ng & Subrahmanian 1992] Model specifies full distribution Conditional Probabilities versus Weights Relational Structures Full Distribution

Parameterization Conditional probability distributions (CPDs) Potentials or feature weights Define directed graph (Bayesian network) Define undirected graph (Markov network) BUGS/Plates, PHA, PRISM, RBNs, PRMs, BLPs, DAPER, BLOG, MEBN RMNs, MLNs Directed Models Probability model Brilliant(res) ~ P(b)

P(b) 0.2 0.8 Bayesian network (BN) Brilliant(Res1) Accepted(pub) ~ Brilliant (AuthorOf(pub)) P(a) P(a) b 0.8 0.2

b 0.3 0.7 Accepted(Pub1) Parameters easy to interpret Relational skeleton Researcher = {Res1} Publication = {Pub1} AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Res1)} CPDs can be estimated separately But need to ensure BN is acyclic Directed Models Probability model Brilliant(res) ~ P(b)

P(b) 0.2 0.8 Bayesian network (BN) Brilliant(Res1) Accepted(pub) ~ Brilliant (AuthorOf(pub)) P(a) P(a) b 0.8 0.2

b 0.3 0.7 Accepted(Pub1) Accepted(Pub2) Parameters easy to interpret Relational skeleton Researcher = {Res1} Publication = {Pub1, Pub2} AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Res1), (Pub2, Res1)} CPDs can be estimated separately But need to ensure BN is acyclic Changing relational skeleton doesnt change optimal parameters

Undirected Models Probability model res, Markov network Brilliant(res) b 0.2 b 0.8 Brilliant(Res1) res, pub : res = AuthorOf(pub) Accepted(pub) Brilliant(res) a

a b 0.8 0.2 b 0.3 0.7 Relational skeleton Researcher = {Res1} Publication = {Pub1} AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Res1)} Accepted(Pub1) No acyclicity constraints But parameters harder to interpret

Estimating parameters requires inference over whole model Undirected Models Probability model res, Markov network Brilliant(res) b b 1 1 same distribution, different parameters res, pub : res = AuthorOf(pub) Brilliant(Res1)

Accepted(pub) Brilliant(res) a a b 0.16 0.04 b 0.24 0.56 Relational skeleton Researcher = {Res1} Publication = {Pub1}

AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Res1)} Accepted(Pub1) No acyclicity constraints But parameters harder to interpret Estimating parameters requires inference over whole model Undirected Models Probability model res, Markov network Brilliant(res) b b 1 1

res, pub : res = AuthorOf(pub) applies twice marginal now [(0.2)2, (0.8)2] Brilliant(Res1) Accepted(pub) Brilliant(res) a a b 0.16 0.04

b 0.24 0.56 Relational skeleton Researcher = {Res1} Publication = {Pub1, Pub2} AuthorOf = {(Pub1, Res1), (Pub2, Res1)} Accepted(Pub1) Accepted(Pub2) No acyclicity constraints But parameters harder to interpret Estimating parameters requires inference over whole model Changing relational skeleton may change optimality of parameters

Independent Choices versus Probabilistic Dependencies Relational Structures Full Distribution CPDs Decomposition Model is decomposed into independent, random coin flips and logical rules PHA, PRISM Independent Choice Logic [Poole 1997] Model defines probabilistic dependencies between parent and child variables BUGS/Plates, RBNs, PRMs, BLPs, DAPER, BLOG, MEBN Making All Random Choices Independent With dependent choices: Flip coin for Accepted(pub) with bias determined by Brilliant(AuthorOf(pub)) With independent choices:

Flip coins for all possible values of Brilliant(AuthorOf(pub)) pub Accepted_given_Brilliant(pub, True) ~ Bernoulli[0.8, 0.2] pub Accepted_given_Brilliant(pub, False) ~ Bernoulli[0.3, 0.7] Choose which flip to use based on actual value of Brilliant(AuthorOf(pub)) pub Accepted(pub) = Accepted_given_Brilliant(pub, Brilliant(AuthorOf(pub))) Makes algorithms more elegant, but representation more cumbersome Known versus Unknown Objects Relational Structures Full Distribution CPDs Probabilistic Dependencies Set of objects Fixed for all possible worlds, in one-to-one correspondence with symbols (e.g., Herbrand universe)

Varies from world to world, with uncertainty about symbol-object mapping BUGS/Plates, RBNs, DAPER, BLPs (PRMs), MEBN, BLOG Example Again: Bibliographies Russell, Stuart and Norvig, Peter. Articial Intelligence. Prentice-Hall, 1995. S. Russel and P. Norvig (1995). Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Levels of Uncertainty Attribute Uncertainty Relational Uncertainty Unknown

Objects A B C B D C D A, B, C, D C C D

C C A, C B, D B, D A B D A, C C D A

B A B D A B A B D A B A C

D B A C, D Bayesian Logic (BLOG) [Milch et al., IJCAI 2005] Completely defines probability distribution over model structures with varying sets of objects Intuition: Stochastic generative process with two kinds of steps: Set the value of a function on a tuple of arguments Add some number of objects to the world BLOG Model for Bibliographies guaranteed Citation Cit1, Cit2, Cit3, Cit4; #Res ~ NumResearchersPrior(); String Name(Res r) ~ NamePrior(); #Pub ~ NumPubsPrior(); NaturalNum NumAuthors(Pub p) ~ NumAuthorsPrior();

Res NthAuthor(Pub p, NaturalNum n) if (n < NumAuthors(p)) then ~ Uniform({Res r}); String Title(Pub p) ~ TitlePrior(); Pub PubCited(Citation c) ~ Uniform({Pub p}); String Text(Citation c) ~ CitationCPD (Title(PubCited(c)), {Name(NthAuthor(PubCited(c), n)) for NaturalNum n : n < NumAuthors(PubCited(c))}); BLOG Model for Bibliographies guaranteed Citation Cit1, Cit2, Cit3, Cit4; #Res ~ NumResearchersPrior(); Number statements String Name(Res r) ~ NamePrior(); #Pub ~ NumPubsPrior(); Dependency statements NaturalNum NumAuthors(Pub p) ~ NumAuthorsPrior(); Res NthAuthor(Pub p, NaturalNum n) if (n < NumAuthors(p)) then ~ Uniform({Res r});

String Title(Pub p) ~ TitlePrior(); Pub PubCited(Citation c) ~ Uniform({Pub p}); String Text(Citation c) ~ CitationCPD (Title(PubCited(c)), {Name(NthAuthor(PubCited(c), n)) for NaturalNum n : n < NumAuthors(PubCited(c))}); BLOG Model for Bibliographies guaranteed Citation Cit1, Cit2, Cit3, Cit4; #Res ~ NumResearchersPrior(); String Name(Res r) ~ NamePrior(); #Pub ~ NumPubsPrior(); Elementary CPDs NaturalNum NumAuthors(Pub p) ~ NumAuthorsPrior(); Res NthAuthor(Pub p, NaturalNum n) if (n < NumAuthors(p)) then ~ Uniform({Res r}); String Title(Pub p) ~ TitlePrior(); Pub PubCited(Citation c) ~ Uniform({Pub p}); String Text(Citation c) ~ CitationCPD (Title(PubCited(c)), {Name(NthAuthor(PubCited(c), n)) for

NaturalNum n : n < NumAuthors(PubCited(c))}); BLOG Model for Bibliographies guaranteed Citation Cit1, Cit2, Cit3, Cit4; #Res ~ NumResearchersPrior(); String Name(Res r) ~ NamePrior(); #Pub ~ NumPubsPrior(); NaturalNum NumAuthors(Pub p) ~ NumAuthorsPrior(); Res NthAuthor(Pub p, NaturalNum n) if (n < NumAuthors(p)) then ~ Uniform({Res r}); String Title(Pub p) ~ TitlePrior(); CPD arguments Pub PubCited(Citation c) ~ Uniform({Pub p}); String Text(Citation c) ~ CitationCPD (Title(PubCited(c)), {Name(NthAuthor(PubCited(c), n)) for NaturalNum n : n < NumAuthors(PubCited(c))}); Syntax of Dependency Statements F( x1, ..., xk) if then ~ (, ..., )

elseif then ~ (, ..., ) ... else ~ (, ..., ); Conditions are arbitrary first-order formulas Elementary CPDs are names of Java classes Arguments can be terms or set expressions Number statements: same except that their headers have the form # Semantics: Contingent BN [Milch et al., AI/Stats 2005] Each BLOG model defines a contingent BN #Pub Title((Pub, 1)) (Pub, 2) =

PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 1) PubCited(Cit1) Title((Pub, 2)) PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 2) Title((Pub, 3)) PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 3) Text(Cit1) Theorem: Every BLOG model that satisfies certain conditions (analogous to BN acyclicity) fully defines a distribution [see Milch et al., IJCAI 2005]

Design of BLOG: Choosing Function Values Choosing values for functions, not just predicates Pub PubCited(Citation c) ~ Uniform({Pub p}); Removes unique names assumption ? PubCited(Cit1) = PubCited(Cit2) Alternative in logic: relation PubCited(c, p) But then BN has many Boolean PubCited nodes for each citation Need to force relation to be functional Design of BLOG: Contingent Dependencies Arguments passed to CPDs are determined by other variables, which can also be random String Text(c) ~ CitationCPD(Title(PubCited(c));

Contrast with BLPs, where BN contains all edges that are active in any context Text(c) :- Title(p), PubCited(c, p). Also contrast with languages that make context explicit, but require it to be non-random [Ngo & Haddawy 1997; Fierens et al. 2005] Text(c) | Title(p) PubCited(c, p). Design of BLOG: Explicit Aggregation One dependency statement per random function Can have if-then-else clauses String Title(Pub p) if Type(p) = Proceedings then ~ ProcTitlePrior else ~ OrdinaryTitlePrior; Can pass multisets into CPDs String Text(Citation c) ~ CitationCPD (Title(PubCited(c)), {Name(NthAuthor(PubCited(c), n)) for NaturalNum n : n < NumAuthors(PubCited(c))});

Contrast with combining rules in BLPs, etc. Design of BLOG: Number Statements #Pub ~ NumPubsPrior(); Distribution for number of objects of a type Can also have objects generating objects, e.g., aircraft generating radar blips Contrast with existence variables in MEBN [Laskey & Costa 2005] Easier to have one number variable than sequence of existence variables Number statements make interchangeability explicit Can be exploited in inference; see [Milch & Russell, UAI 06] Inference Task: Find posterior probability that query Q is true given

evidence E P( E Q) P(Q | E ) P( E ) Naive solution involves summing probabilities of worlds in E and in E Q Q E Inference on BNs Most common FOPL inference method: Construct BN defined by model Perform exact or approximate inference on BN But many BLOG models define infinite BNs #Pub Title((Pub, 1)) PubCited(Cit1)

= (Pub, 1) PubCited(Cit1) Title((Pub, 2)) Title((Pub, 3)) PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 2) Text(Cit1) PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 3) Exploiting Context-Specific Relevance Sampling algorithms only need to instantiate finite set of context-specifically relevant variables Rejection sampling [Milch et al., IJCAI 2005]

Likelihood weighting [Milch et al., AI/Stats 2005] Metropolis-Hastings MCMC [Milch & Russell, UAI 2006] Theorem: For structurally well-defined BLOG models, sampling algorithms converge to correct probability for any query, using finite time per sampling step Metropolis-Hastings MCMC Q E Let s1 be arbitrary state in E For n = 1 to N Sample sE from proposal distribution q(s | sn) Compute acceptance probability p s q sn | s max 1,

p sn q s | sn With probability , let sn+1 = s; else let sn+1 = sn Fraction of visited states in Q converges to p(Q|E) Proposer for Citations [Pasula et al., NIPS 2002] Split-merge moves: Propose titles and author names for affected publications based on citation strings Other moves change total number of publications MCMC States Not complete instantiations! No titles, author names for uncited publications States are partial instantiations of random variables #Pub = 100, PubCited(Cit1) = (Pub, 37), Title((Pub, 37)) = Calculus

Each state corresponds to an event: set of worlds satisfying description MCMC over Events [Milch & Russell, UAI 2006] Markov chain over events , with stationary distrib. proportional to p() Theorem: Fraction of visited events in Q converges to p(Q|E) if: Each is either subset of Q or disjoint from Q Events form partition of E Q E Computing Probabilities of Events

Need to compute p() / p(n) efficiently (without summations) Use instantiations that include all active parents of the variables they instantiate Then probability is product of CPDs: p( ) p ( X ) | (Pa ( X )) X X vars( ) Learning Parameters: Easy to estimate CPDs from complete data With incomplete data, use EM algorithm Structure: Choose parents [e.g., Friedman et al. 1999, Popescul et al. 2003, Landwehr et al. 2005, Kok & Domingos 2005]

Choose aggregation functions Learn conditions under which CPDs apply Predicate/Function Invention Predicate invention has long history in ILP But typically new predicates are defined deterministically in terms of existing predicates In probabilistic case: Invent random functions With existing functions as parents, as in [Revoredo et al., this conference] Without parents, e.g., relation Colleagues(a, b) to explain co-authorship patterns Inventing family of latent variables in BN Entity Invention Invent new types of objects, such as: Atoms (as in John McCarthys talk) Conferences, to explain recurring substrings of citation strings Requires representation that allows

unknown objects Objects of invented types will not be known to modeler in advance Challenge Problem [Courtesy of Prof. Josh Tenenbaum, MIT] Cognitive science question: could children learn concept of an object, or must it be innate? Given sequence of frames (pixel arrays), learn model that includes colored blocks Initially, only functor is Color(x, y, t) Summary There is method to the madness of FOPLs Bayesian logic (BLOG) Defines full distribution over relational structures Allows unknown objects, unknown mapping from symbols to objects Makes contingent dependencies explicit Inference can be possible even when model

yields infinite BN Exciting challenges in predicate/entity invention http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~milch/blog

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