Chapter 6: Transform-and-Conquer - UCR

Chapter 6: Transform-and-Conquer - UCR

Chapter 6 Transform-and-Conquer Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. Transform and Conquer This group of techniques solves a problem by a transformation to a simpler/more convenient instance of the same problem (instance simplification) to a different representation of the same instance (representation change) to a different problem for which an algorithm is already available (problem reduction) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-2 Instance simplification - Presorting Solve a problems instance by transforming it into another simpler/easier instance of the same problem Presorting Many problems involving lists are easier when list is sorted.

searching computing the median (selection problem) checking if all elements are distinct (element uniqueness) Also: Topological sorting helps solving some problems for dags. Presorting is used in many geometric algorithms. Presorting is a special case of preprocessing. Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-3 How fast can we sort ? Efficiency of algorithms involving sorting depends on efficiency of sorting. Theorem (see Sec. 11.2): log2 n! n log2 n comparisons are necessary in the worst case to sort a list of size n by any comparison-based algorithm. Note: About nlog2 n comparisons are also sufficient to sort array of size n (by mergesort). Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-4 Searching with presorting Problem: Search for a given K in A[0..n-1] Presorting-based algorithm: Stage 1 Sort the array by an efficient sorting algorithm Stage 2 Apply binary search

Efficiency: (nlog n) + O(log n) = (nlog n) Good or bad? Why do we have our dictionaries, telephone directories, etc. sorted? Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-5 Element Uniqueness with presorting Presorting-based algorithm Stage 1: sort by efficient sorting algorithm (e.g. mergesort) Stage 2: scan array to check pairs of adjacent elements Efficiency: (nlog n) + O(n) = (nlog n) Brute force algorithm Compare all pairs of elements Efficiency: O(n2) Another algorithm? Hashing, which works well on avg. Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-6

Instance simplification Gaussian Elimination Given: A system of n linear equations in n unknowns with an arbitrary coefficient matrix. Transform to: An equivalent system of n linear equations in n unknowns with an upper triangular coefficient matrix. Solve the latter by substitutions starting with the last equation and moving up to the first one. a11x1 + a12x2 + + a1nxn = b1 a21x1 + a22x2 + + a2nxn = b2 an1x1 + an2x2 + + annxn = bn Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. a1,1x1+ a12x2 + + a1nxn = b1 a22x2 + + a2nxn = b2 annxn = bn A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-7 Gaussian Elimination (cont.) The transformation is accomplished by a sequence of elementary operations on the systems coefficient matrix (which dont change the systems solution): for i 1 to n-1 do replace each of the subsequent rows (i.e., rows i+1, , n) by the difference between that row and an appropriate multiple of the i-th row to make the new coefficient in the i-th column of that row 0

Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-8 Example of Gaussian Elimination Solve 2x1 - 4x2 + x3 = 6 3x1 - x2 + x3 = 11 x1 + x2 - x3 = -3 Gaussian elimination 2 -4 1 6 2 -4 1 6 3 -1 1 11 row2 (3/2)*row1 0 5 -1/2 2 1 1 -1 -3 row3 (1/2)*row1 0 3 -3/2 -6 row3(3/5)*row2 2 0 0 -4 1 6 5 -1/2 2 0 -6/5 -36/5 Backward substitution x3 = (-36/5) / (-6/5) = 6 x2 = (2+(1/2)*6) / 5 = 1 x1 = (6 6 + 4*1)/2 = 2 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved.

A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-9 Pseudocode and Efficiency of Gaussian Elimination Stage 1: Reduction to the upper-triangular matrix for i 1 to n-1 do for j i+1 to n do for k i to n+1 do A[j, k] A[j, k] - A[i, k] * A[j, i] / A[i, i] //improve! Stage 2: Backward substitution for j n downto 1 do t0 for k j +1 to n do t t + A[j, k] * x[k] x[j] (A[j, n+1] - t) / A[j, j] Efficiency: (n3) + (n2) = (n3) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-10 Searching Problem Problem: Given a (multi)set S of keys and a search key K, find an occurrence of K in S, if any Searching must be considered in the context of: file size (internal vs. external) dynamics of data (static vs. dynamic)

Dictionary operations (dynamic data): find (search) insert delete Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-11 Taxonomy of Searching Algorithms List searching (good for static data) sequential search binary search interpolation search Tree searching (good for dynamic data) binary search tree binary balanced trees: AVL trees, red-black trees multiway balanced trees: 2-3 trees, 2-3-4 trees, B trees Hashing (good on average case) open hashing (separate chaining) closed hashing (open addressing)

Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-12 Binary Search Tree Arrange keys in a binary tree with the binary search tree property: K K 5 3 Example: 5, 3, 1, 10, 12, 7, 9 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 1 10 7 A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 12 9 6-13 Dictionary Operations on Binary Search Trees

Searching straightforward Insertion search for key, insert at leaf where search terminated Deletion 3 cases: deleting key at a leaf deleting key at node with single child deleting key at node with two children Efficiency depends of the trees height: log2 n h n-1, with height average (random files) be about 3log2 n Thus all three operations have worst case efficiency: (n) average case efficiency: (log n) (CLRS, Ch. 12) Bonus: inorder traversal produces sorted list Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-14 Balanced Search Trees Attractiveness of binary search tree is marred by the bad (linear) worst-case efficiency. Two ideas to overcome it are: to rebalance binary search tree when a new insertion makes the tree too unbalanced AVL trees red-black trees to allow more than one key and two children

2-3 trees 2-3-4 trees B-trees Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-15 Balanced trees: AVL trees Definition An AVL tree is a binary search tree in which, for every node, the difference between the heights of its left and right subtrees, called the balance factor, is at most 1 (with the height of an empty tree defined as -1) 1 2 10 10 0 1 0 0 5 20

5 20 1 -1 4 7 0 1 -1 12 4 7 0 0 0 0

2 8 2 8 (a) (b) Tree (a) is an AVL tree; tree (b) is not an AVL tree Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-16 Rotations If a key insertion violates the balance requirement at some node, the subtree rooted at that node is transformed via one of the four rotations. (The rotation is always performed for a subtree rooted at an unbalanced node closest to the new leaf.) 1 2 2 0 2

0 3 2 3 2 R > 0 0 -1 1 3 1 0 1 LR >

0 0 1 3 0 (a) Single R-rotation Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 2 (c) Double LR-rotation A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-17 General case: Single R-rotation Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-18

General case: Double LR-rotation Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-19 AVL tree construction - an example Construct an AVL tree for the list 5, 6, 8, 3, 2, 4, 7 0 -1 -2 5 5 5 0 L(5) 0 -1 6

6 6 > 0 0 5 8 0 8 1 2 1 6 6 6 1 0 2

0 5 8 5 8 0 3 R (5) > 0 0 3 8 1 0 0 3

2 5 0 2 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-20 AVL tree construction - an example (cont.) 2 0 6 5 -1 0 3 8 LR (6) >

0 -1 3 6 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 2 4 8 0 4 -1

0 5 5 0 -2 0 3 6 3 RL (6) 0 0 1 2 4 8

> 0 7 0 0 0 0 2 4 6 8 0 7 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-21 Analysis of AVL trees h 1.4404 log2 (n + 2) - 1.3277 N(h-1) + N(h-2) N(h)

average height: 1.01 log2n + 0.1 for large n (found empirically) Search and insertion are O(log n) Deletion is more complicated but is also O(log n) Disadvantages: frequent rotations complexity A similar idea: red-black trees (height of subtrees is allowed to differ by up to a factor of 2) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-22 Multiway Search Trees Definition A multiway search tree is a search tree that allows more than one key in the same node of the tree. Definition A node of a search tree is called an n-node if it contains n-1 ordered keys (which divide the entire key range into n intervals pointed to by the nodes n links to its children):

k1 < k2 < < kn-1 < k1 [k1, k2 ) kn-1 Note: Every node in a classical binary search tree is a 2-node Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-23 2-3 Tree Definition A 2-3 tree is a search tree that may have 2-nodes and 3-nodes height-balanced (all leaves are on the same level) K < K1

(K1 , K 2 ) > K2 A 2-3 tree is constructed by successive insertions of keys given, with a new key always inserted into a leaf of the tree. If the leaf is a 3-node, its split into two with the middle key promoted to the parent. Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-24 2-3 tree construction an example Construct a 2-3 tree the list 9, 5, 8, 3, 2, 4, 7 8 > 9 5, 9 5, 8, 9 8 2, 3, 5 8 5

3, 5 9 3, 8 > 2 9 5 9 3, 8 2 9 4, 5 9 5 > 3, 8 2 4, 5, 7

9 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. > 3, 5, 8 2 4 7 9 3 2 8 4 A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 7 9 6-25 Analysis of 2-3 trees log3 (n + 1) - 1 h log2 (n + 1) - 1

Search, insertion, and deletion are in (log n) The idea of 2-3 tree can be generalized by allowing more keys per node 2-3-4 trees B-trees Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-26 Heaps and Heapsort Definition A heap is a binary tree with keys at its nodes (one key per node) such that: It is essentially complete, i.e., all its levels are full except possibly the last level, where only some rightmost keys may be missing The key at each node is keys at its children (this is called a max-heap) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved.

A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-27 Illustration of the heaps definition 10 10 5 4 7 2 1 a heap 10 5 7 2 1 not a heap

5 6 7 2 1 not a heap Note: Heaps elements are ordered top down (along any path down from its root), but they are not ordered left to right Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-28 Some Important Properties of a Heap Given n, there exists a unique binary tree with n nodes that is essentially complete, with h = log2 n The root contains the largest key

The subtree rooted at any node of a heap is also a heap A heap can be represented as an array Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-29 Heaps Array Representation Store heaps elements in an array (whose elements indexed, for convenience, 1 to n) in top-down left-to-right order Example: 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 1 3 4 9 5 3 1 4 2

2 Left child of node j is at 2j Right child of node j is at 2j+1 Parent of node j is at j/2 Parental nodes are represented in the first n/2 locations Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-30 Heap Construction (bottom-up) Step 0: Initialize the structure with keys in the order given Step 1: Starting with the last (rightmost) parental node, fix the heap rooted at it, if it doesnt satisfy the heap condition: keep exchanging it with its larger child until the heap condition holds Step 2: Repeat Step 1 for the preceding parental node Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-31 Example of Heap Construction Construct a heap for the list 2, 9, 7, 6, 5, 8 2 2

9 6 7 5 > 9 6 8 8 5 2 8 5 7 9 8 6

5 7 9 9 6 2 > 7 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 9 2 6 8 5 7 >

6 2 A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 8 5 7 6-32 Pseudopodia of bottom-up heap construction Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-33 Heapsort Stage 1: Construct a heap for a given list of n keys Stage 2: Repeat operation of root removal n-1 times: Exchange keys in the root and in the last (rightmost) leaf Decrease heap size by 1 If necessary, swap new root with larger child until the heap condition holds Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved.

A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-34 Example of Sorting by Heapsort Sort the list 2, 9, 7, 6, 5, 8 by heapsort Stage 1 (heap construction) 1 9 7 6 5 8 2 9 8 6 5 7 2 9 8 6 5 7 9 2 8 6 5 7 9 6 8 2 5 7 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. Stage 2 (root/max removal) 9 6 8 2 5 7 7 6 8 2 5|9 8 6 7 2 5|9 5 6 7 2|8 9 7 6 5 2|8 9 2 6 5|7 8 9 6 2 5|7 8 9 5 2|6 7 8 9 5 2|6 7 8 9 2|5 6 7 8 9 A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-35 Analysis of Heapsort Stage 1: Build heap for a given list of n keys worst-case h-1

C(n) = 2(h-i) 2i = 2 ( n log2(n + 1)) (n) i=0 # nodes at level i Stage 2: Repeat operation of root removal n-1 times (fix heap) worst-case n-1 C(n) = 2log i (nlogn) 2 i=1 Both worst-case and average-case efficiency: (nlogn) In-place: yes Stability: no (e.g., 1 1) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-36 Priority Queue A priority queue is the ADT of a set of elements with numerical priorities with the following operations: find element with highest priority delete element with highest priority insert (new) element with assigned priority (see below)

Heap is a very efficient way for implementing priority queues A min-heap can also be used to handle priority queue in which highest priority = smallest number Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-37 Insertion of a New Element into a Heap Insert the new element at last position in heap. Compare it with its parent and, if it violates heap condition, exchange them Continue comparing the new element with nodes up the tree until the heap condition is satisfied Example: Insert key 10 9 6 2 >

8 5 10 9 7 10 6 2 > 10 5 7 8 2 6 9

5 Efficiency: O(log n) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 7 8 6-38 Horners Rule For Polynomial Evaluation Given a polynomial of degree n p(x) = anxn + an-1xn-1 + + a1x + a0 and a specific value of x, find the value of p at that point. Two brute-force algorithms: p0 for i n downto 0 do power 1 for j 1 to i do power power * x p p + ai * power return p Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. p a0; power 1 for i 1 to n do power power * x p p + ai * power return p

A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-39 Horners Rule Example: p(x) = 2x4 - x3 + 3x2 + x - 5 = x(2x3 - x2 + 3x + 1) - 5 = x(x(2x2 - x + 3) + 1) - 5 = x(x(x(2x - 1) + 3) + 1) - 5 Substitution into the last formula leads to a faster algorithm Same sequence of computations are obtained by simply arranging the coefficient in a table and proceeding as follows: coefficients x=3 2 2 -1 3*2+(-1)=5 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. 3 3*5+3=18 1 -5 3*18+1=55 3*55+(-5)=160 A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6

6-40 Horners Rule pseudocode Efficiency of Horners Rule: # multiplications = # additions = n Synthetic division of p(x) by (x-x0) Example: Let p(x) = 2x4 - x3 + 3x2 + x - 5. Find p(x):( -3) + 55 2x^3 + 5x^2 +x18x Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-41 Computing an (revisited) Left-to-right binary exponentiation Initialize product accumulator by 1. Scan ns binary expansion from left to right and do the following: If the current binary digit is 0, square the accumulator (S); if the binary digit is 1, square the accumulator and multiply it by a (SM). Example: Compute a13. Here, n = 13 = 11012.

binary rep. of 13: 1 1 0 1 SM SM S SM accumulator: 1 12*a=a a2*a = a3 (a3)2 = a6 (a6)2*a= a13 (computed left-to-right) Efficiency: (b-1) M(n) 2(b-1) where b = log2 n + 1 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-42 Computing an (cont.) Right-to-left binary exponentiation Scan ns binary expansion from right to left and compute an as the product of terms a2 i corresponding to 1s in this expansion. Example Compute a13 by the right-to-left binary exponentiation. Here, n = 13 = 11012. 1 1 a8 a4 a8 *

a4 (computed right-to-left) 0 a2 * 1 a a : : a2 i terms product Efficiency: same as that of left-to-right binary exponentiation Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-43 Problem Reduction This variation of transform-and-conquer solves a problem by a transforming it into different problem for which an algorithm is already available. To be of practical value, the combined time of the transformation and solving the other problem should be smaller than solving the problem as given by another method.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 6-44 Examples of Solving Problems by Reduction computing lcm(m, n) via computing gcd(m, n) lcm(m,n)*gcd(m,n) = m*n counting number of paths of length n in a graph by raising the graphs adjacency matrix to the n-th power transforming a maximization problem to a minimization problem and vice versa (also, min-heap construction) linear programming reduction to graph problems (e.g., solving puzzles via statespace graphs) Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6

6-45 Examples of Solving Problems by Reduction Counting number of paths of length n in a graph by raising the graphs adjacency matrix to the n-th power If (directed) graph G has adjacency matrix A, then for any k, the (i,j) entry in A^k gives the number of paths from vertex i and j of length k. (Levitin, Ch. 6.6) 1 4 2 3 Copyright 2007 Pearson Addison-Wesley. All rights reserved. A= [ ] [ ] 0011 1010 0001 0000 A^2 = A. Levitin Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, 2 nd ed., Ch. 6 0001 0012 0000

0000 6-46

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