Chapter Title - University of Texas at San Antonio

Chapter Title - University of Texas at San Antonio

Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships Chapter 6 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Learning Objective 1 Explain how changes in activity affect contribution margin and net operating income. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 2 Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis The contribution income statement is helpful to managers in judging the impact on profits of changes in selling price, cost, or volume. The emphasis is on cost behavior. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Sales (500 bicycles) $

250,000 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 Contribution margin 100,000 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 Contribution Margin (CM) is the amount remaining from sales revenue after variable expenses have been deducted. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 3 Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 Less: Variable expenses

150,000 Contribution margin 100,000 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 CM is used first to cover fixed expenses. Any remaining CM contributes to net operating income. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 4 The Contribution Approach Sales, variable expenses, and contribution margin can also be expressed on a per unit basis. If Racing sells an additional bicycle, $200 additional CM will be generated to cover fixed expenses and profit. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit

Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 300 Contribution margin 100,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 5 The Contribution Approach Each month, RBC must generate at least $80,000 in total contribution margin to break-even

(which is the level of sales at which profit is zero). Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 300 Contribution margin 100,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Slide 6 The Contribution Approach If RBC sells 400 units in a month, it will be operating at the break-even point. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (400 bicycles) $ 200,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 120,000 300 Contribution margin 80,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000

Net operating income $ - McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 7 The Contribution Approach If RBC sells one more bike (401 bikes), net operating income will increase by $200. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (401 bicycles) $ 200,500 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 120,300 300 Contribution margin

80,200 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 200 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 8 The Contribution Approach We do not need to prepare an income statement to estimate profits at a particular sales volume. Simply multiply the number of units sold above break-even by the contribution margin per unit. IfIf Racing Racing sells sells 430 430 bikes, bikes, its its net

net operating operating income income will will be be $6,000. $6,000. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 9 CVP Relationships in Equation Form The contribution format income statement can be expressed in the following equation: Profit = (Sales Variable expenses) Fixed expenses Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (401 bicycles) $

200,500 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 120,300 300 Contribution margin 80,200 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 200 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 10 CVP Relationships in Equation Form This equation can be used to show the profit RBC earns if it sells 401. Notice, the answer of $200 mirrors our earlier solution.

Profit = (Sales Variable expenses) Fixed expenses $80,000 $80,000 401 401 units units $500 $500 401 401 units units $300 $300 Profit $200 = ($200,500 $120,300) Variable expenses) $80,000 Fixed expenses Fixed McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 11 CVP Relationships in Equation Form

When a company has only one product we can further refine this equation as shown on this slide. Profit = (Sales Variable expenses) Fixed expenses Quantity sold (Q) Selling price per unit (P) = Sales (Q P) Quantity sold (Q) Variable expenses per unit (V) = Variable expenses (Q V) Profit = (P Q V Q) Fixed expenses McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 12 CVP Relationships in Equation Form This equation can also be used to show the $200 profit RBC earns if it sells 401 bikes. Profit = (Sales Variable expenses) Fixed expenses Profit = (P Q V Q) Fixed expenses

$200 Profit $200 = ($500 401 $300 401) $80,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 13 CVP Relationships in Equation Form It is often useful to express the simple profit equation in terms of the unit contribution margin (Unit CM) as follows: Unit CM = Selling price per unit Variable expenses per unit Unit CM = P V Profit = (P Q V Q) Fixed expenses Profit = (P V) Q Fixed expenses Profit = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 14 CVP Relationships in Equation Form Profit = (P Q V Q) Fixed expenses Profit = (P V) Q Fixed expenses

Profit = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses Profit = ($500 $300) 401 $80,000 Profit = $200 401 $80,000 This equation Profit = $80,200 $80,000 can also be Profit = $200 used to compute RBCs $200 profit if it sells 401 bikes. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 15 Learning Objective 2 Prepare and interpret a cost-volume-profit (CVP) graph and a profit graph. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 16

CVP Relationships in Graphic Form The relationships among revenue, cost, profit and volume can be expressed graphically by preparing a CVP graph. Racing Bicycle developed contribution margin income statements at 0, 200, 400, and 600 units sold. We will use this information to prepare the CVP graph. Units Sold 200 0 Sales $ - $ 100,000 $ 400 200,000

600 $ 300,000 Total variable expenses - 60,000 120,000 180,000 Contribution margin - 40,000 80,000 120,000

80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 Fixed expenses Net operating income (loss) McGraw-Hill/Irwin $ (80,000) $ (40,000) $ -

$ 40,000 Slide 17 Dollars Preparing the CVP Graph In a CVP graph, unit volume is usually represented on the horizontal (X) axis and dollars on the vertical (Y) axis. Units McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 18 Preparing the CVP Graph Dollars Draw

Draw aa line line parallel parallel to to the the volume volume axis axis to to represent represent total total fixed fixed expenses. expenses. Units McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 19 Preparing the CVP Graph Dollars

Choose Choose some some sales sales volume, volume, say say 400 400 units, units, and and plot plot the the point point representing representing total total expenses expenses (fixed (fixed and and variable). variable). Draw Draw aa line line through through the the data data point point

back back to to where where the the fixed fixed expenses expenses line line intersects intersects the the dollar dollar axis. axis. Units McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 20 Preparing the CVP Graph Dollars Choose

Choose some some sales sales volume, volume, say say 400 400 units, units, and and plot plot the the point point representing representing total total sales. sales. Draw Draw aa line line through through the the data data point point back back to to the the point point of

of origin. origin. Units McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 21 Preparing the CVP Graph Profit Profit Area Area Dollars Break-even point (400 units or $200,000 in sales) Loss Loss Area Area McGraw-Hill/Irwin Units Slide 22

Preparing the CVP Graph Profit Profit == Unit Unit CM CM Q Q Fixed Fixed Costs Costs $ 60,000 $ 40,000 Profit $ 20,000 $0 -$20,000 An even simpler form of the CVP graph is called the profit graph. -$40,000 -$60,000 0

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 100 200 300 400 Number of bicycles sold 500 600 Slide 23 Preparing the CVP Graph $ 60,000 Break-even Break-even point, point, where where profit profit is

is zero zero ,, is is 400 400 units units sold. sold. $ 40,000 Profit $ 20,000 $0 -$20,000 -$40,000 -$60,000 0 McGraw-Hill/Irwin 100 200 300

400 Number of bicycles sold 500 600 Slide 24 Learning Objective 3 Use the contribution margin ratio (CM ratio) to compute changes in contribution margin and net operating income resulting from changes in sales volume. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 25 Contribution Margin Ratio (CM Ratio) The CM ratio is calculated by dividing the total contribution margin by total sales.

Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 300 Contribution margin 100,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 CM Ratio 100% 60% 40%

$100,000 $250,000 = 40% McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 26 Contribution Margin Ratio (CM Ratio) The contribution margin ratio at Racing Bicycle is: CM per unit = CM Ratio = SP per unit $200 $500 = 40% The CM ratio can also be calculated by dividing the contribution margin per unit by the selling price per unit. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 27

Contribution Margin Ratio (CM Ratio) If Racing Bicycle increases sales by $50,000, contribution margin will increase by $20,000 ($50,000 40%). Here is the proof: 400 400 Units Units Sales $$200,000 Sales 200,000 Less: Less: variable variable expenses expenses 120,000 120,000 Contribution 80,000 Contribution margin margin 80,000 Less: 80,000 Less: fixed fixed expenses

expenses 80,000 Net $$ -Net operating operating income income 500 500 Units Units $$250,000 250,000 150,000 150,000 100,000 100,000 80,000 80,000 $$ 20,000 20,000 A $50,000 increase in sales revenue results in a $20,000 increase in CM. ($50,000 40% = $20,000) McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Slide 28 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the CM Ratio for Coffee Klatch? a. 1.319 b. 0.758 c. 0.242 d. 4.139 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 29 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average.

What is the CM Ratio for Coffee Klatch? a. 1.319 Unit contribution margin CM Ratio = b. 0.758 Unit selling price c. 0.242 ($1.49-$0.36) = $1.49 d. 4.139 = McGraw-Hill/Irwin $1.13 = 0.758 $1.49 Slide 30 Contribution Margin Ratio (CM Ratio) The relationship between profit and the CM ratio can be expressed using the following equation: Profit = CM ratio Sales Fixed expenses If Racing Bicycle increased its sales volume to 500

bikes, what would management expect profit or net operating income to be? Profit = 40% $250,000 $80,000 Profit = $100,000 $80,000 Profit = $20,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 31 Learning Objective 4 Show the effects on contribution margin of changes in variable costs, fixed costs, selling price, and volume. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 32 The Variable Expense Ratio The variable expense ratio is the ratio of variable expenses to sales. It can be computed by dividing the total variable expenses by the total sales, or in a single product

analysis, it can be computed by dividing the variable expenses per unit by the unit selling price. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 300 Contribution margin 100,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000

McGraw-Hill/Irwin CM Ratio 100% 60% 40% Slide 33 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume What is the profit impact if Racing Bicycle can increase unit sales from 500 to 540 by increasing the monthly advertising budget by $10,000? McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 34 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume $80,000 $80,000 ++ $10,000 $10,000 advertising advertising == $90,000

$90,000 Sales Less: Variable expenses Contribution margin Less: Fixed expenses Net operating income 500 units $ 250,000 150,000 100,000 80,000 $ 20,000 540 units $ 270,000 162,000 108,000 90,000 $ 18,000 Sales

Sales increased increased by by $20,000, $20,000, but but net net operating operating income income decreased decreased by by $2,000 $2,000.. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 35 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume A shortcut solution using incremental analysis Increase in CM (40 units X $200) Increase in advertising expenses Decrease in net operating income McGraw-Hill/Irwin

$ 8,000 10,000 $ (2,000) Slide 36 Change in Variable Costs and Sales Volume What is the profit impact if Racing Bicycle can use higher quality raw materials, thus increasing variable costs per unit by $10, to generate an increase in unit sales from 500 to 580? McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 37 Change in Variable Costs and Sales Volume 580 580 units units $310 $310 variable variable cost/unit

cost/unit == $179,800 $179,800 Sales Less: Variable expenses Contribution margin Less: Fixed expenses Net operating income 500 units $ 250,000 150,000 100,000 80,000 $ 20,000 580 units $ 290,000 179,800 110,200 80,000 $ 30,200

Sales Sales increase increase by by $40,000, $40,000, and and net net operating operating income income increases increases by by $10,200 $10,200.. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 38 Change in Fixed Cost, Sales Price and Volume What is the profit impact if RBC: (1) cuts its selling price $20 per unit, (2) increases its advertising budget by $15,000 per month, and (3) increases sales from 500 to 650 units per month?

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 39 Change in Fixed Cost, Sales Price and Volume 650 650 units units $480 $480 == $312,000 $312,000 Sales Less: Variable expenses Contribution margin Less: Fixed expenses Net operating income 500 units $ 250,000 150,000 100,000 80,000 $ 20,000

650 units $ 312,000 195,000 117,000 95,000 $ 22,000 Sales Sales increase increase by by $62,000, $62,000, fixed fixed costs costs increase increase by by $15,000, $15,000, and and net net operating operating income income increases increases by by $2,000

$2,000.. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 40 Change in Variable Cost, Fixed Cost and Sales Volume What is the profit impact if RBC: (1) pays a $15 sales commission per bike sold instead of paying salespersons flat salaries that currently total $6,000 per month, and (2) increases unit sales from 500 to 575 bikes? McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 41 Change in Variable Cost, Fixed Cost and Sales Volume 575 575 units units $315 $315 == $181,125 $181,125

Sales Less: Variable expenses Contribution margin Less: Fixed expenses Net operating income 500 units $ 250,000 150,000 100,000 80,000 $ 20,000 575 units $ 287,500 181,125 106,375 74,000 $ 32,375 Sales Sales increase increase by by $37,500,

$37,500, fixed fixed expenses expenses decrease decrease by by $6,000 $6,000.. Net Net operating operating income income increases increases by by $12,375. $12,375. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 42 Change in Regular Sales Price If RBC has an opportunity to sell 150 bikes to a wholesaler without disturbing sales to other customers or fixed expenses, what price would it quote to the wholesaler if it wants to increase monthly profits by $3,000?

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 43 Change in Regular Sales Price $$ 3,000 3,000 150 150 bikes bikes Variable Variable cost cost per per bike bike Selling Selling price price required required == == == $$ 20

20 per per bike bike 300 300 per per bike bike $$ 320 320 per per bike bike 150 150 bikes bikes $320 $320 per per bike bike Total Total variable variable costs costs Increase Increase in in net

net operating operating income income McGraw-Hill/Irwin == $$ 48,000 48,000 == 45,000 45,000 == $$ 3,000 3,000 Slide 44 Learning Objective 5 Determine the level of sales needed to attain a target profit. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 45

Target Profit Analysis We can compute the number of units that must be sold to attain a target profit using either: 1. Equation method 2. Formula method. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 46 Equation Method Profit = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses Our goal is to solve for the unknown Q which represents the quantity of units that must be sold to attain the target profit. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 47 Target Profit Analysis Suppose Racing Bicycle management wants to

know how many bikes must be sold to earn a target profit of $100,000. Profit = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses $100,000 = $200 Q $80,000 $200 Q = $100,000 $80,000 Q = ($100,000 + $80,000) $200 Q = 900 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 48 The Formula Method The formula uses the following equation. Unit sales to attain Target profit + Fixed expenses = the target profit CM per unit McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 49

Target Profit Analysis in Terms of Unit Sales Suppose Racing Bicycle Company wants to know how many bikes must be sold to earn a profit of $100,000. Unit sales to attain Target profit + Fixed expenses = the target profit CM per unit $100,000 + $80,000 Unit sales = $200 Unit sales = 900 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 50 Target Profit Analysis We can also compute the target profit in terms of sales dollars using either the equation method or the formula method. Equatio

n Method McGraw-Hill/Irwin OR Formul a Method Slide 51 Equation Method Profit = CM ratio Sales Fixed expenses Our goal is to solve for the unknown Sales which represents the dollar amount of sales that must be sold to attain the target profit. Suppose RBC management wants to know the sales volume that must be generated to$100,000 earn a =target $100,000. 40% profit

Sales of $80,000 40% Sales = $100,000 + $80,000 Sales = ($100,000 + $80,000) 40% Sales = $450,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 52 Formula Method We can calculate the dollar sales needed to attain a target profit (net operating profit) of $100,000 at Racing Bicycle. Dollar sales to attain Target profit + Fixed expenses = the target profit CM ratio $100,000 + $80,000 Dollar sales = 40%

Dollar sales = $450,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 53 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. Use the formula method to determine how many cups of coffee would have to be sold to attain target profits of $2,500 per month. a. 3,363 cups b. 2,212 cups c. 1,150 cups d. 4,200 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 54 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is

$1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is salesfixed expense per month is $1,300. $0.36. The Unit average Target profit + Fixed expenses to attain = to determineUnit Use the formula method howCM many cups of target profit coffee would have to be sold to attain target profits of $2,500 + $1,300 $2,500 per month. = $1.49 - $0.36 a. 3,363 cups b. 2,212 cups $3,800 = $1.13 c. 1,150 cups

d. 4,200 cups = 3,363 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 55 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. Use the formula method to determine the sales dollars that must be generated to attain target profits of $2,500 per month. a. $2,550 b. $5,011 c. $8,458 d. $10,555 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 56 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is

$1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. Use the formula method to determine the sales dollars Sales $ Target profit + Fixed expenses that must be to generated to attain target profits of $2,500 attain = CM ratio per month.target profit a. $2,550 $2,500 + $1,300 = ($1.49 0.36) $1.49 b. $5,011 c. $8,458 $3,800 = 0.758

d. $10,555 = $5,011 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 57 Learning Objective 6 Determine the break-even point. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 58 Break-even Analysis The equation and formula methods can be used to determine the unit sales and dollar sales needed to achieve a target profit of zero. Lets us the RBC information to complete the break-even analysis. Racing Bicycle Company Contribution Income Statement For the Month of June Total Per Unit

Sales (500 bicycles) $ 250,000 $ 500 Less: Variable expenses 150,000 300 Contribution margin 100,000 $ 200 Less: Fixed expenses 80,000 Net operating income $ 20,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin CM Ratio 100% 60% 40% Slide 59 Break-even in Unit Sales:

Equation Method Profits = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses Suppose RBC wants to know how many bikes must be sold to break-even (earn a target profit of $0). $0 = $200 Q + $80,000 Profits are zero at the break-even point. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 60 Break-even in Unit Sales: Equation Method Profits = Unit CM Q Fixed expenses $0 = $200 Q + $80,000 $200 Q = $80,000 Q = 400 bikes McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 61 Break-even in Unit Sales:

Formula Method Lets apply the formula method to solve for the break-even point. Unit sales to = break even Fixed expenses CM per unit $80,000 Unit sales = $200 Unit sales = 400 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 62 Break-even in Dollar Sales: Equation Method Suppose Racing Bicycle wants to compute the sales dollars required to break-even (earn a target profit of $0). Lets use the equation method to solve this problem.

Profit = CM ratio Sales Fixed expenses Solve for the unknown Sales. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 63 Break-even in Dollar Sales: Equation Method Profit = CM ratio Sales Fixed expenses $ 0 = 40% Sales $80,000 40% Sales = $80,000 Sales = $80,000 40% Sales = $200,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 64 Break-even in Dollar Sales: Formula Method Now, lets use the formula method to calculate the dollar sales at the break-even point. Dollar sales to

Fixed expenses = break even CM ratio $80,000 Dollar sales = 40% Dollar sales = $200,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 65 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales dollars? a. $1,300 b. $1,715 c. $1,788 d. $3,129

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 66 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales dollars? a. $1,300 Fixed expenses Break-even = b. $1,715 CM Ratio sales $1,300 c. $1,788 = 0.758 d. $3,129 = $1,715

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 67 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales in units? a. 872 cups b. 3,611 cups c. 1,200 cups d. 1,150 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 68 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is

Fixedonexpenses $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month average. Break-even = What is the break-even sales in units? CM per Unit $1,300 a. 872 cups = $1.49/cup - $0.36/cup b. 3,611 cups $1,300 c. 1,200 cups = $1.13/cup d. 1,150 cups = 1,150 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 69 Learning Objective 7

Compute the margin of safety and explain its significance. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 70 The Margin of Safety in Dollars The margin of safety in dollars is the excess of budgeted (or actual) sales over the break-even volume of sales. Margin of safety in dollars = Total sales - Break-even sales Lets look at Racing Bicycle Company and determine the margin of safety. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 71 The Margin of Safety in Dollars If we assume that RBC has actual sales of $250,000, given that we have already determined the break-even sales to be $200,000, the

margin of safety is $50,000 as shown. Break-even Break-even sales sales 400 400 units units Sales $$ 200,000 Sales 200,000 Less: 120,000 Less: variable variable expenses expenses 120,000 Contribution 80,000 Contribution margin margin 80,000 Less: 80,000

Less: fixed fixed expenses expenses 80,000 Net $$ -Net operating operating income income McGraw-Hill/Irwin Actual Actual sales sales 500 500 units units $$ 250,000 250,000 150,000 150,000 100,000 100,000 80,000

80,000 $$ 20,000 20,000 Slide 72 The Margin of Safety Percentage RBCs margin of safety can be expressed as 20% of sales. ($50,000 $250,000) Break-even Break-even sales sales 400 400 units units Sales $$ 200,000 Sales 200,000 Less: 120,000 Less: variable

variable expenses expenses 120,000 Contribution 80,000 Contribution margin margin 80,000 Less: 80,000 Less: fixed fixed expenses expenses 80,000 Net $$ -Net operating operating income income McGraw-Hill/Irwin Actual Actual sales sales

500 500 units units $$ 250,000 250,000 150,000 150,000 100,000 100,000 80,000 80,000 $$ 20,000 20,000 Slide 73 The Margin of Safety The margin of safety can be expressed in terms of the number of units sold. The margin of safety at RBC is $50,000, and each bike sells for $500; hence, RBCs margin of safety is 100 bikes. Margin of = Safety in units

McGraw-Hill/Irwin $50,000 = 100 bikes $500 Slide 74 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the margin of safety expressed in cups? a. 3,250 cups b. 950 cups c. 1,150 cups d. 2,100 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 75

Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the margin of safety expressed in cups? a. 3,250 cups b. 950 cups c. 1,150 cups Margin of safety = Total sales Break-even sales d. 2,100 cups = 2,100 cups 1,150 cups = 950 cups McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 76 Cost Structure and Profit Stability Cost structure refers to the relative proportion of fixed and variable costs in an organization. Managers often have some latitude in determining their organizations cost structure. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Slide 77 Cost Structure and Profit Stability There are advantages and disadvantages to high fixed cost (or low variable cost) and low fixed cost (or high variable cost) structures. An advantage of a high fixed cost structure is that income A disadvantage of a high fixed will be higher in good years cost structure is that income compared to companies will be lower in bad years with lower proportion of compared to companies fixed costs. with lower proportion of fixed costs. Companies with low fixed cost structures enjoy greater stability in income across good and bad years. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 78 Learning Objective 8

Compute the degree of operating leverage at a particular level of sales and explain how it can be used to predict changes in net operating income. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 79 Operating Leverage Operating leverage is a measure of how sensitive net operating income is to percentage changes in sales. It is a measure, at any given level of sales, of how a percentage change in sales volume will affect profits. Degree of operating leverage McGraw-Hill/Irwin Contribution margin = Net operating income

Slide 80 Operating Leverage To illustrate, lets revisit the contribution income statement for RBC. Actual Actual sales sales 500 500 Bikes Bikes Sales $$ 250,000 Sales 250,000 Less: 150,000 Less: variable variable expenses expenses 150,000 Contribution 100,000 Contribution margin margin

100,000 Less: 80,000 Less: fixed fixed expenses expenses 80,000 Net $$ 20,000 Net income income 20,000 Degree of Operating Leverage McGraw-Hill/Irwin $100,000 = $20,000 = 5

Slide 81 Operating Leverage With an operating leverage of 5, if RBC increases its sales by 10%, net operating income would increase by 50%. Percent increase in sales Degree of operating leverage Percent increase in profits 10% 5 50% Heres the verification! McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 82 Operating Leverage 10% increase in sales from $250,000 to $275,000 . . .

. . . results in a 50% increase in income from $20,000 to $30,000. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 83 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the operating leverage? a. 2.21 b. 0.45 c. 0.34 d. 2.92 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 84 Quick Check Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a Actual sales 2,100 cups

downtown office building. The average selling Sales $ 3,129 price of a cup of coffeeLess: is $1.49 andexpenses the average756 Variable variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average2,373 Contribution margin fixed expense per month isFixed $1,300. 2,100 cups1,300 Less: expenses are sold each month on Netaverage.

operating What incomeis the $ 1,073 operating leverage? a. 2.21 b. 0.45 Operating Contribution margin c. 0.34 leverage = Net operating income d. 2.92 $2,373 = $1,073 = 2.21 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 85 Quick Check At Coffee Klatch the average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49, the average variable expense per cup is $0.36, the average fixed expense per month is $1,300 and an average of 2,100 cups are sold each month. If sales increase by 20%, by how much should net

operating income increase? a. 30.0% b. 20.0% c. 22.1% d. 44.2% McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 86 Quick Check At Coffee Klatch the average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49, the average variable expense per cup is $0.36, the average fixed expense per month is $1,300 and an average of 2,100 cups are sold each month. If sales increase by 20%, by how much should net operating income increase? a. 30.0% Percent increase in sales 20.0% b. 20.0% 2.21 Degree of operating leverage c. 22.1%

Percent increase in profit 44.20% d. 44.2% McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 87 Verify Increase in Profit Actual sales 2,100 cups Sales $ 3,129 Less: Variable expenses 756 Contribution margin 2,373 Less: Fixed expenses 1,300 Net operating income $ 1,073 % change in sales % change in net operating income McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Increased sales 2,520 cups $ 3,755 907 2,848 1,300 $ 1,548 20.0% 44.2% Slide 88 Structuring Sales Commissions Companies generally compensate salespeople by paying them either a commission based on sales or a salary plus a sales commission. Commissions based on sales dollars can lead to lower profits in a company. Lets look at an example. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Slide 89 Structuring Sales Commissions Pipeline Unlimited produces two types of surfboards, the XR7 and the Turbo. The XR7 sells for $100 and generates a contribution margin per unit of $25. The Turbo sells for $150 and earns a contribution margin per unit of $18. The sales force at Pipeline Unlimited is compensated based on sales commissions. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 90 Structuring Sales Commissions If you were on the sales force at Pipeline, you would push hard to sell the Turbo even though the XR7 earns a higher contribution margin per unit. To eliminate this type of conflict, commissions can be based on contribution margin rather than on selling price alone. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Slide 91 Learning Objective 9 Compute the break-even point for a multiproduct company and explain the effects of shifts in the sales mix on contribution margin and the break-even point. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 92 The Concept of Sales Mix Sales mix is the relative proportion in which a companys products are sold. Different products have different selling prices, cost structures, and contribution margins. When a company sells more than one product, break-even analysis becomes more complex as the following example illustrates. Lets assume Racing Bicycle Company sells bikes and carts and that the sales mix between the two products remains the same.

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 93 Multi-Product Break-Even Analysis Bikes comprise 45% of RBCs total sales revenue and the carts comprise the remaining 55%. RBC provides the following information: Bicycle Sales $ 250,000 100% Variable expenses 150,000 60% Contribution margin 100,000 40.0% Fixed expenses Net operating income Carts $ 300,000 135,000

165,000 Sales mix $ 300,000 $ 250,000 45% 100% 45% 55% 55% Total $ 550,000 100.0% 285,000 51.8% 265,000 48.2% 170,000 $ 95,000

$ 550,000 100% $265,000 = 48.2% (rounded) $550,000 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 94 Multi-Product Break-Even Analysis Dollar sales to Fixed expenses = break even CM ratio Dollar sales to break even Sales $ Variable expenses Contribution margin Fixed expenses Net operating income Sales mix

McGraw-Hill/Irwin $ = Bicycle 158,714 100% 95,228 60% 63,485 40% $170,000 48.2% Carts $ 193,983 87,293 106,691 = $352,697 100%

45% 55% Rounding error 158,714 45% $ 193,983 55% $ Total 352,697 182,521 170,176 170,000 176 $ 352,697

$ 100.0% 51.8% 48.2% 100.0% Slide 95 Key Assumptions of CVP Analysis Selling price is constant. Costs are linear and can be accurately divided into variable (constant per unit) and fixed (constant in total) elements. In multiproduct companies, the sales mix is constant. In manufacturing companies, inventories do not change (units produced = units sold). McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 96 End of Chapter 6

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Slide 97

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