Competing Behaviors Pathways and Behavior Support Plans

Competing Behaviors Pathways and Behavior Support Plans Before You Can Work on Changing a Behavior You need to know WHY You can make a behavior worse Need to know the function of the behavior Gain something or avoid something? Think of it as a Doctor Visit Look at the symptoms Diagnose Find the right level of care If symptoms persist, may need to re-diagnose

Tools needed 1. Data Collection 2. Competing Behaviors Pathways 3. Behavior Support Plans (Dont always need) Where Do You Start? Data Collection Gather information Collect data on the problem behavior Through observations Through interviews Past information Look at what is happening before (antecedent) Look at what happens after (reinforcing behavior) Data collection tools

Why use the Pathways chart? Consensus Establishes buy-in Visual of the real issues Competing Pathways Upper: Get thisgeneral positive behavior Middle: Prevent thisreactive strategies to prevent problem behavior escalation Lower: Accept thisFERB in lieu of problem behavior when general positive upper pathway fails Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion

What other students are doing What is currently going on What can we accept while working on the behavior? Advanced Behavior Management Meet Our Example Student Brian Please read the next slide to yourself On a piece of paper please write down Main behavior Antecedents Consequences Brian is a kindergartener on IEP for speech

Has many features suggestive of autism He is verbal, and uses 3-4 word sentences routinely to express needs and wants, but never to comment on something in the environment. Brian likes routines, and becomes very upset if the bus is late, or if the bus driver is not the expected one. On those days, when Brians bus routine has changed, staff members say they know he will have problems. Each school day Brian puts his coat away, and goes to circle time. After going to circle, on many days, Brian will run away, and kick and head butt if captured after running away, if the activity at circle time lasts more than five minutes. Brian is more likely to leave circle by running away, on days when the bus routine has changed from the typical bus routine The process: Look at the boxes one by one *Very important to fill the boxes out in the order the are numbered*

Look at the information that should go there Look at some examples Decide what should go there for Brian Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative

3. Typical Consequence 1. Problem Behavior 5. Maintaining Consequences Not continuous 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management

1. Define Problem Behavior Measurable Observable Objective Examples for define problem Behavior Off task: crawls on the floor; plays with objects in desk; attempts play with others Poor organization and planning: rushes to complete assignment without planning each phase; waits until the final work period to begin a long term

assignment Tantrums: Outbursts/Rage/ Explosive Reactions Naughty student throws materials; student crawls under the desk and screams with high volume. Bullies others Wastes time Uses profane language Shoves, pushes students, calls names Fiddles with things in desk during independent work time Summary Statement

Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence 1.Problem

Behavior 5. Maintaining Consequences Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management Summary Statement

Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence 1. Problem

Behavior 5. Maintaining Consequences Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 2. Desired Alternative Behavior

Supposed to do Other students doing Examples for desired alternative behavior Sit at desk Complete assignment during class time Turn in neat completed homework on time Use language that does not contain swear words while talking to peers and teachers Keep hands and feet to self while in the lunch room Summary Statement

Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous . 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson

1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 3. Typical Consequence

5. Maintaining Consequences Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle

time and listen to the lesson 1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management Typical

Consequence 3. 5. Maintaining Consequences #3 Typical Consequence for #2 What happens when the student or all the other students exhibit the desired behavior written in #2? Examples for typical consequences Students are allowed access to the computer

Students learn the material Students are able to move on to the next lesson in the book Students are able to stay in the classroom and participate in class Students are able to play on the playground Students are able to sit where they want at lunch Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence Sit in circle

time and listen to the lesson Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents 1. Problem

Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 5. Maintaining Consequences Summary Statement Order of Team

Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson 1. Problem

Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 3. Typical Consequence Learn the information the teacher is sharing

verbal praise 5. Maintaining Consequences #4 Triggering Antecedents Situations People Time Place Object Etc. Examples for triggering antecedents Physical Setting Sensory under or over stimulation: noise, crowding, temperature, etc.; missing or present materials,

configurations of furniture; Social Setting Interaction patterns in or around the student, people present or absent; substitute teacher Instructional Strategies Scheduling Factors Mismatch between learner accommodation needs and instructional components. An accommodation plan may be necessary to increase student success. Specific times within the schedule; with or without sequencing and transition supports; absence of a visual schedule; unanticipated changes in routine.

Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle

time and listen to the lesson 1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management

3. Typical Consequence Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise 5. Maintaining Consequences Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not

continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson 1. Problem Behavior

Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 3. Typical Consequence Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal

praise 5. Maintaining Consequences #5 Maintaining Consequences Why do they keep doing it? Also know as function of the behavior Gain- object, attention, stimulation, acceptance from peers/adults Avoid- avoid a situation, escape a location, protest something, protest someone It can be both Keep it simple Usually if the behavior stops being reinforcing it will eventually stop Examples for Maintaining

Consequences Getting Examples: To gain adult attention To gain sustained peer attention and positive comments (use instead of power) To gain a desired item or activity To get a choice in the pacing of activities (use instead of control) Reject: (Escape/Protest/Avoid) Examples: To escape or avoid a task student states is (a) too hard or (b) too long, or (c) not meaningful to the student or (d) to escape peer comments that the task is too easy To avoid or protest a demand or request or reprimand To escape an environment in which the student states negative comments from peers frequently occur To escape or avoid specific people or activities Summary Statement

Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous 4. Triggering Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes 2. Desired Alternative Sit in circle time and

listen to the lesson 1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 3. Typical

Consequence Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise 5. Maintaining Consequences Does not Have to Participate In circle time Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion

6. Setting Events Must be periodic, Not continuous! 4. Triggering Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes 2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence

Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise 5. 1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time

7. Acceptable Alternative Advanced Behavior Management 5. Maintaining Consequences Does not Have to Participate In circle time #6 Setting Events ADD TO the likelihood a behavior will occur Does not occur all the time

Examples Setting Event Child refused meds Child broke up with girl/boyfriend Child did not get enough sleep the night before Why is the setting event important? If You Expect It, Pre-correct It! Dont need a formal behavior plan Brian likes routines, and becomes very upset if the bus is late, or if the bus driver is not the expected one. On those days, when Brians bus routine has changed, staff members say they know he will have problems. Each school day Brian puts his coat away, and goes to circle time. After going to circle, on many days, Brian will run away, and kick and head butt if captured after running away, if the activity at circle time lasts more than five minutes.

Brian is more likely to leave circle by running away, on days when the bus routine has changed from the typical bus routine. Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Bus is late/not The usual bus driver 4. Triggering Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes

2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise

1. Problem Behavior Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement seventh Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management 5. Maintaining Consequences Does not

Have to Participate In circle time Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous Bus is late/not The usual bus driver 2. Desired Alternative

3. Typical Consequence Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson Learn the information the teacher is sharing verbal praise 4. Triggering Antecedents

1. Problem Behavior Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement Behavior) Advanced Behavior Management

5. Maintaining Consequences Does not Have to Participate In circle time #7 Replacement Behavior What student should do instead of the problem behavior? Positive alternative that allows the student to obtain the same outcome that the problem behavior provided. Must be as easily performed as the problem behavior. Examples for Replacement Behavior

Swears at teacher: protesting a lack of attention- Replacement desire for attention from the teacher. Behavior: Verbally state a Fights: protesting not getting his way during a recess game- Replacement protest language taught in verbal conflict resolution training. Behavior: Use Screams: protesting an unexpected activity- Replacement Behavior: Use the printed schedule to protest and then negotiate about an upcoming unexpected activity. Runs from room-escaping hard work- Replacement Behavior: Go to time away/break center. Gains sustained positive peer attention from gang members for assaultive behavior Replacement Behavior: Gain sustained positive peer attention from an alternative group for

prosocial behavior. Summary Statement Order of Team Discussion 6. Setting Events Not continuous Bus is late/not The usual bus driver Advanced Behavior Management 4. Triggering

Antecedents Circle time lasts more than 5 minutes 2. Desired Alternative 3. Typical Consequence Sit in circle time and listen to the lesson Learn the information the

teacher is sharing verbal praise 1. Problem Behavior 5. Maintaining Consequences Gets up and Runs into the Hallway during Circle time 7. Acceptable Alternative (Replacement

Behavior) Teacher will cue Brian to go to Designated spot in The classroom. Does not Have to Participate In circle time FBA Review 1. Need to know why the behavior is happening, or you could make the behavior worse 2. Need to know the function of the behavior 3. Is the student trying to gain something or avoid something 4. Before you can do the FBA you need to collect data 5. When defining the problem behavior, make sure the behavior is measurable,

observable, and objective 6. Triggering antecedents can include situations, people, time, place, objects, etc. 7. The function of the behavior is also known as the maintaining consequence 8. Setting events add to the likelihood a behavior will occur 1. Does not occur all the time. 9. Why is the setting event important? If you expect it, pre-correct it! Questions? Before The Behavior Plan Does the student know your concern? Does the student know the goal? Have you systematically tried to build a positive relationship with the student? Can simple changes be made? Setting Event

Are there situations that make this behavior more likely to occur? #1 What is the problem behavior.why is it important to change Consider the impact on students achievement. 1. Are there less academic or social skills learned by this student or others because of the problem behavior? 2.Does this behavior raise safety or welfare concerns? 3.Behavior Impedes Learning section of IEP #2. Previous Interventions Look at what has been done at home and school If the intervention did not change behavior: Look to see how long the intervention was implemented Look to see who was implementing Did parts of it work? #3. Hypothesis (What is the function of the behavior?)

Using the data, what does the team think is the main function of the behavior? Gain Avoid Both #4 Identify antecedents(triggers) Consider: Time of day Staff Students Task Location #5 changes needed to the environment Changes in time/space/materials/ interactions to remove likelihood of behavior

#6Replacement Behavior (What student should do instead of the problem behavior?) The replacement behavior is a positive alternative that allows the student to obtain the same outcome that the problem behavior provided. It must be as easily performed as the problem behavior. #7 List teaching strategies/ curriculum/materials needed to teach replacement behaviors and staff responsible. List successive teaching steps for student to learn replacement behavior/s Teaching of underlying pivotal skills that will increase the students ability to perform general positive behaviors

#8 Positive reinforcement strategies for displaying appropriate behavior and staff responsible A reinforcer is something proven to increase the behavior. A reward is something we hope the student will strive to earn, but there is no current evidence supporting that conclusion. Rules for Reinforcers Specificity: Be specific Contingency: Contingently given following the desired behavior Efficacy Evidence: Student must WANT the reinforcer

Frequency: The frequency of earning must match the students ability to delay gratification. Immediacy: Delivered immediately after each desired behavior. Young children Just starting behavior plan Choice-within-Variety: Offer more than one reinforcer and allow the student to select. #9 Reactive Strategies and staff responsible ( What to do when the problem behaviors occur, including Crisis Management Plan) What steps will the adults take to return the student to rulefollowing behavior? How can staff best prevent escalation?

What words, items or actions work to calm this specific student? #10 Collections (Methods and frequency of monitoring the progress of the plan) What forms will be used When will plan be revisited for progress Set a date! How long should you give the plan to work? Write specific names of people #11 Team Communication and Staff Responsible Progress monitor to document response to intervention requires defining: 1. the communication participants 2. under what conditions 3. manner 4. expected frequency

5. content 6. two-way specification The student will follow the standard District Discipline Policy/What adaptations will be made? Make sure the principal is in on this conversation Get it in writing Review it often How Long Should We Give it to Work? 3-5 weeks Be aware of extinction bursts Make sure it is being implemented with fidelity If teachers say its not working, find out why Keep taking data!! Be Consistent! Same response every time

Consistency means: children can expect Kindness, Fairness, and Safety in the classroom BSP review 1. The replacement behavior is a positive alternative 2. The replacement behavior must be easily preformed 3. Deliver the reinforcer immediately after the desired behavior for young children and when starting a behavior plan 4. When discussing reactive strategies, make sure to include the steps the adults will take 5. Write steps to help staff prevent escalation 6. Make sure to set a date to revisit progress of the plan 7. The team will need to communicate and progress monitor to document response to interventions 8. It usually takes about 3-5 weeks to see significant change for behaviors that have been occurring for long periods of time 9. Make sure the plan is being implemented with fidelity! Questions?

Celebrate Baby Steps Celebrate small successes Brian may never do exactly what all the other students do things That Work Will Take: Time Patience Energy Caring Commitment

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