Flowering Plants - Ms. Hopkins- Cerame's Science website

Flowering Plants - Ms. Hopkins- Cerame's Science website

Flowering Plants The Angiosperms I. Why Flowers? A) Pollen grains * microscopic, the size of dust particles * produced in great numbers (every single flower can contain 5.5 million)

*Various shapes - spherical, oval, spiked, * patterns are individual and can be linked with a specific species of plant I. Why Flowers Cont. *Pollen grains may survive for tens of thousands of years, and you can chart the history of plants in a certain area by looking at the pollen grains present

B) Flower Structure 1) Male *pollen - flowers male cells (sperm) *stamens (produce pollen) - male organs I. Why Flowers Cont. 2) Female (pistil) *ovary - contains eggs (ovules)

*style - thin pillar leading up from the ovary *stigma - sensitive pad at the top of the style; landing pad for pollen Stamen Pistil

I. Why Flowers Cont. I. Why Flowers Cont. 3) Perfect Flowers - have both male and female parts Imperfect Flowers - the organ of only one sex is present

I. Why Flowers Cont. C. Fertilization 1) The process of pollination Step 1 - pollen grain lands on stigma Step 2 - interaction between stigma and pollen grain forms a pollen tube which grows down to the ovary Step 3 - pollen grains travel down the tube and fertilize the eggs; fertilization time varies greatly. Fertilization

in a geranium takes a few hours while in an orchid it takes a few months I. Why Flowers Cont. 2) Specifics of Pollination * The stigma will not react to pollen from another species. * Unique shape of pollen grains works like a lock and key with the stigma, there is also

a biochemical recognition I. Why Flowers Cont. D. Traveling Pollen If a flowering plant is to reproduce sexually it must make sure that its pollen reaches the stigma of another flower. 1) Methods of Dispersal a) wind

*the smallest pollen grains can be carried by wind ex. Grasses, Oak I. Why Flowers Cont. * Plants that rely on wind for dispersal produce small flowers * stigmas are large and elaborate to intercept flying pollen * wind transport is not accurate, so many

pollen grains produced will not reach the stigma of another flower. I. Why Flowers Cont. b)Animal Messengers *Plants must advertise to attract the attention of messengers * flowers are large and colorful to attract messengers who

collect pollen and deliver it directly to another flower * flowers give messenger benefits ex. Nectar, pollen I. Why Flowers Cont. c) Directing the Insects * flowers tailor their advertisement to match insect

senses * smell - insects attracted by flower perfume (ex. Moths) * vision - insects see in UV spectrum. Many flowers have runway markings only in the UV spectrum I. Why Flowers Cont.

II. After Pollination A) Angiosperms 1) Plants that produce flowers 2) Angiosperms protect their seeds by forming a fruit B) After Pollination 1) once the egg inside the ovule is fertilized by the male pollen then the ovule begins to develop into a seed

II. After Pollination Cont. 2) The seed contains the embryo (fertilized egg) and a food supply for the embryo 3) The ovary enlarges into a fruit with the seeds (ovules) inside. 4) When the seeds are mature the fruit ripens and the flower falls away.

II. After Pollination Cont. C) Types of Fruits 1. Simple - one fruit develops from each flower a. Fleshy * pome - ex. Apple, pear *drupe - ex. Olive, peach, avocado

II. After Pollination Cont. a) Fleshy cont. * berries - ex. tomato, strawberry b) Dry ex. Pecan, acorn, peapod II. After Pollination Cont.

2) Aggregate - many fruits develop from 1 flower ex. Grapes, raspberries 3)Multiple - one fruit develops from each flower in a cluster ex. pineapple

III. Seed Dispersal Plants use different methods to spread (disperse) their seeds. Each seed is specially adapted to its specific method of dispersal 1) Independent dispersal - plants use own resources to spread seeds ex. Mediterranean Cucumber

III. Seed Dispersal Cont. 2) Wind - wind is used to spread seeds ex. dandelions and milkweed Adaptations - lightweight and aerodynamic 3) Water - water is used to spread seeds ex. coconuts Adaptations - waterproof, force

resistant II. After Pollination Cont. 4) Animals - animals eat fruit, swallow seeds, and defecate seeds away from the parent plant ex. Apples, strawberries, etc. Adaptations - edible, tasty,

seeds must survive the acidic stomach Reflection Questions 1. List and describe the male parts of a flower. 2. List and describe the female parts of a flower. 3. What is a perfect flower? 4. Draw a diagram of a perfect flower and label its parts.

5. List the different ways that flowers disperse their pollen.

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