Healthiest Wisconsin 2020 Overview, Sept. 16, 2011

Healthiest Wisconsin 2020 Overview, Sept. 16, 2011

Healthiest Wisconsin Wisconsin 2020: 2020: Healthiest Collaborative Leadership Leadership Collaborative See also the companion document entitled: HW2020 Collaborative Leadership Supplement (April 2013). This supplement was prepared for public health system partners as a means to deepen knowledge and broaden the availability of community leadership practices to protect and promote the health of all people in the communities where we live, grow, work, learn and play. Objectives Describe collaborative leadership practices and processes. Determine how collaborative leadership can make a difference in communities and organizations. Deepen and broaden self-learning by using the

H2020 Collaborative Leadership Supplement. Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 2 The Challenge The Need Leaders know some of the most critically important tasks require lateral leadership, boundary crossing leadership, involving groups over whom one has little control. They must exercise leader-like influence beyond the system over which they preside. They must do what they can to lead without authority. Source: John Gardner, On Leadership Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/

3 Leadership Content / Context Content is strong with a solid foundation and many contributing authors. Context has changed How? Intense search for meaning Values and virtues are now discussed openly We often question if our current efforts are really making a difference Search for a higher purpose Global economy Diverse workforce / diverse communities Kouzes and Posner, The Leadership Challenge Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 4

Thinking and Acting Consider: . . . None of us can expect to act on more than a tiny corner of the great complexity. But in our interrelated society, itself part of an uncompromising interdependent world, we have to think about the whole complexity in order to act relevantly on any part of it. Harlan Cleveland, The Knowledge Executive Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 5 Collaborative Leadership Why? People want to be engaged in civic life. They want their views heard, understood and considered. They want to know that their involvement will make

a difference, and that the public, not governments or special interest groups, defines the public interest. Chrislip and Larson, Collaborative Leadership Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 6 Collaborative Leadership What is it? Taking a leadership role in a coalition, organization, or enterprise where: Everyone is on an equal footing. Participants work together to solve a problem, create something new, or run an organization / initiative. The leader relies on the group to work with both

content and substance. The leader promotes and safeguards the process. University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Chrislip and Larson, Collaborative Leadership Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 7 Principles Inspire commitment and action Use collaborative problem-solving and decisionmaking Its an open process with no set end-point when it begins the end-point is worked out by the group thats collaboration. Lead as a peer problem solver Build broad-based involvement Sustain hope and participation Chrislip and Larson, Collaborative Leadership;

University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 8 Advantages Buy-in More involvement in implementation Trust building Eliminate turf issues Access to more and better information / ideas Increased opportunity for results University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/

9 Advantages Generates new leaders Empowers collective action at the community and / or organizational levels Offers a fundamental change for the better in the ways communities and organizations operate University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 10 A Fundamental Change In previous slide, one advantage is identified as a fundamental change for the better.

This is consistent with John Keslers vision of inclusive, consensus-oriented civil discourse. This strongly aligns with the concepts of the healthy communities movement. John Kesler, Healthy Communities and Civil Discourse, 2000 Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 11 Challenges Time consuming Demands an ability to face conflict directly Need to overcome resistance to the whole idea of collaborative leadership Some may accuse the leader of not doing his/her job Participants might prefer authority figures making decisions or telling them what to do people may be used to authoritarian approaches

Discomfort with uncertainty Old notions of the leader as hero University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 12 When Not to Use It Collaborative leadership may not work well in the following situations: Command-and-control environments (military combat situations, epidemic control) Rigorous approaches to ascertaining scientific evidence / scientific approaches University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer

http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 13 When to Use It Collaborative leadership works well: When the timing is right When problems are serious / complex Where there are a number of stakeholders with varied interests / perspectives When other attempts at solutions have not worked When an issue affects a whole organization or entire or large portion of a community When inclusiveness and empowerment are goals from the beginning University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/

14 Consider The strategies and approaches we take may not be the ultimate solutions to todays problems but they must be an improved evolving expression of an ideal. Adapted from How Your Child Is Smart, Donna Marcova, page 31 Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 15 Creative Tension Peter Senge, The Fifth Discipline

Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 16 Creative Tension Tension here does not mean anxiety or stress or emotional tension. Its a force when we acknowledge our vision is at odds with current reality. When we feel that the vision is too high, people naturally will ask to lower the vision. Or, we lower the vision when we fear failure (including personal failure). We are tempted to quit. We should do the opposite - elevate current reality instead of lowering the vision - keep our visions high. Peter Senge, The Fifth Discipline Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/

17 Balancing Advocacy / Inquiry Advocacy can cut off inquiry; most importantly, it can cut off learning. Without inquiry, advocacy begets more advocacy and positions become hardened. Theres no forward movement. Creates escalation of problems. Inquiry asking questions such as: What leads you to that position? Can you illustrate your point for me? What questions might you ask to foster inquiry? Peter Senge, The Fifth Discipline Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 18

Dialogue When we balance inquiry and advocacy, we create opportunities for dialogue. Remember: dialogue is generative It creates new knowledge. Knowledge stimulates learning by people and by stakeholders. Suggested reading: Dialogic Leadership William Isaacs, Vol.10, No. 1, Systems Thinker Peter Senge and William Isaacs, combined sources Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 19 Characteristics / Traits of Collaborative Leaders

Trusted and respected Relate to people easily Good facilitators Catalysts Nurture new and emerging leaders Safeguard the process Motivated to find solutions to real problems Focus on whats best for the group, the organization or the community as a whole Focus on broad rather than narrow-interest issues University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/

20 Effective Collaborative Leaders Five practices of collaborative leaders: 1. Lead the process 2. Understand the context in the given situation 3. Motivate 4. Be flexible and persistent 5. Set aside ones ego Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 21 Collaborative Leadership Practice #1 Establish, maintain and safeguard the

collaborative process. Help the group to: Set norms Assure everyone gets heard Encourage and model inclusiveness Foster real connections between people Mediate conflicts / disputes Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 22 Collaborative Leadership Practice #1 (continued) Help the group to: Create mechanisms to solicit ideas Maintain collaborative problem solving / decisions Push the group toward effectiveness

Choose doable projects first, to build confidence and demonstrate group success Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 23 Collaborative Leadership Practice #2 Know the leadership context: The community or organization The nature of the problem See next slide (three types of problems) Barriers to collaboration Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer

http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 24 Aligning Problem Type and Leadership Approach Problem Type Nature of Problem Nature of Solution Leadership Approach Type 1

Clear Clear Directive leader role as expert. (Solves the problem; gives instructions) Type 2 Clear Unclear Dual leader - role as directive and coach. (Solicits group involvement; asks for input; encourages; meet peoples needs; may bring in an expert. Leader may ultimately make the decision.) Type 3

Unclear Unclear Collaborative leader. (Listens; praise; asks for input; gives feedback; facilitates and encourages confidence and motivation; creates learning through dialogue by balancing inquiry and advocacy.) Sources: Chrislip and Larson; Heifitz; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox; and, St. Louis University, SPH, National Leadership Network, Collaborative Leadership webcast, January 2013 Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 25 Collaborative Leadership Practice #3

Motivate, motivate, motivate Be upbeat even when things look bleak Keep the group focused on the future Keep focused on the bigger picture Identify and celebrate small successes Guard against discouragement and burn-out Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 26 Collaborative Leadership Practice #4 Be flexible, yet be unyielding Be flexible: Try new ideas including ideas from unusual or unlikely sources Change course as the situation demands

Let go of something that isnt working Create opportunities for more participation Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 27 Collaborative Leadership Practice #4 (continued) Be flexible, yet be unyielding Be unyielding: Protect the integrity of an open, collaborative process Practice inclusiveness Keep the group on track Advocate for the best interests of the group as a whole Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox

Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 28 Collaborative Leadership Practice #5 Check your ego at the door Let go of your own ego Forget about being a hero or taking credit Contribute to problem-solving as a member Accept the decisions of the group Chrislip and Larson; University of Kansas, Community Toolbox Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 29

Closing Leaders know some of the most critically important tasks require lateral leadership, boundary crossing leadership, involving groups over whom one has little control. They must exercise leader-like influence beyond the system over which they preside. They must do what they can to lead without authority. John Gardner Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 30 Additional Supplemental Slides Please feel free to use these additional slides to supplement your learning in collaborative

leadership. Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 31 Levels of Discourse in Building Healthy Communities Level 1. 2. 3. Descriptors Influence and even control decisions by individuals, institutions, and interest groups. Used to getting what they want due to power, money and influence (e.g., government, powerful industries, Wall Street). Here we must take responsibility for respecting others rights if we are to enjoy our own.

Gets us no further than balancing and accommodating interests. Doesnt lead us to maximizing personal or community health. This can result in confrontations and winlose outcomes (e.g., dispute resolution, such as mediation, arbitration). Higher cognitive and moral awareness, deep sense of empathy. Works well with homogeneous ethnic and socioeconomic groups (town meetings). Focus is on responsibility and ownership / accountability. Here priorities, policies, plans are developed consistent with values conducive to personal and community flourishing. By participating, people begin to own it and work together (e.g., healthy communities initiatives, HW2020). (Adapted) Primary source: John T. Kesler, Healthy Communities and Civil Discourse Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 32 Levels of Discourse in Building Healthy Communities Level 3. 4.

5. Descriptors Includes voices not usually heard. Level 3 is good but insufficient; too easy to be satisfied with priorities; may not consider the entire community. Address fairness, social justice, universal respect and public policy. Look beyond the issues and solutions that arise out of discourse / dialogue. Finding commonalities can bridge deep cultural differences. Can yield policy implications that are broader than the scope of the initiating community (e.g., housing / homelessness, education, social). Extends concern for justice and fairness for each individual without giving up principles of fairness and social justice. Reflects The Golden Rule. Provides the opportunity to promote the highest traditions of a caring and nurturing society (e.g., voting, civil rights, human rights). (Adapted) Primary source: John T. Kesler, Healthy Communities and Civil Discourse Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 33

Collaborating for a Change: Applying Himmelmans Approach Definition Relationship Characteristics Networking Information exchange Coordinating Information exchange and alter activities to achieve a common purpose Cooperating

All of coordinating plus resource Informal Minimal time, low levels of trust, no turf sharing Formal Moderate time and trust, no turf sharing, make services user friendly Formal Substantial time, high trust, high

access to each others turf Collaborating All of cooperating plus enhancing the capacity of another to achieve a common purpose Formal Extensive time, very high trust, reciprocal capacity enhancements Arthur T. Himmelman, Collaborating for a Change Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer

http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 34 Collaborating for a Change: Applying Himmelmans Approach Resources Networking No mutual sharing of resources Coordinating None or minimal resource sharing Cooperating Moderate to extensive

resource sharing. Some sharing of risks, responsibilities and rewards. Collaborating Full sharing of resources, risks, responsibilities and rewards Arthur T. Himmelman, Collaborating for a Change Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 35 Additional Resources David Chrislip and Carl E. Larson: Collaborative

Leadership William Isaacs: Dialogic Leadership James Kouzes and Barry Posner: The Leadership Challenge Arthur T. Himmelman: Collaboration for a Change John Kesler: Civil Discourse Peter Senge: The Fifth Discipline John Gardner: On Leadership Ronald Heifetz: Leadership Without Easy Answers Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 36 Margaret O. Schmelzer, MS, RN State Health Plan Director Director of Public Health Nursing and Health Policy Division of Public Health Wisconsin Department of Health Services Madison, Wisconsin

[email protected] (608) 266-0877 April 2013 Thank You Healthiest Wisconsin 2020: Everyone Living Better, Longer http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/hw2020/ 37

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Marketing: Real People, Real Choices_Ninth Edition

    Marketing: Real People, Real Choices_Ninth Edition

    Width of product mix must be considered. Product lines in mix usually have some things in common. LECTURE NOTES: The product mix is the total set of products a firm offers for sale. Developing a product mix strategy requires consideration...
  • What is a trade union? Trade unions are

    What is a trade union? Trade unions are

    What is a trade union? "Trade unions are organised groups of workers who come together to support each other in the workplace, negotiating with employers to improve pay, terms and conditions and ensure fair and equal treatment.. Unions provide members...
  • Attachment Theory - Sonoma State University

    Attachment Theory - Sonoma State University

    Attachment Theory Definition of Attachment An enduring emotional tie to a special person, characterized by a tendency to seek and maintain closeness, especially during times of stress.
  • History of the Atom From Atomism to the

    History of the Atom From Atomism to the

    In the late 1700's and 1800's, scientists such as Dalton were able to determine experimentally that when water formed, it took two "parts" of hydrogen by volume and one "part" of oxygen by volume. This suggested water was made of...
  • Textbook:  .. English Lexicology in Theory and Practice

    Textbook: .. English Lexicology in Theory and Practice

    Lexicography is the science and art of dictionary-compiling, is traditionally included in a course of Lexicology. Modern English Lexicology studies: Semasiology. Word-Structure. Word-Formation. Etymology of the English Word-Stock. Word-groups. Phraseology. Variants of the English Language.
  • Working with MTM - dds

    Working with MTM - dds

    "MTM is responsible for all non-emergency medical transportation within the Washington DC metropolitan area, including the city of Washington DC, the suburbs of Montgomery and Prince Georges County in Maryland, and Northern Virginia counties of Fairfax, Arlington and the City...
  • Traumatic Head injuries - Stellenbosch University

    Traumatic Head injuries - Stellenbosch University

    The Brain Trauma Foundation now recommends that the CPP target after severe TBI should lie between 50-70mmHg. ... Compressed or absent basal cisterns measured at the midbrain level. tSAH. Blood in the basal cisterns. ... Traumatic Head injuries
  • Emotions in Social Networks: Distributions, Patterns, and Models

    Emotions in Social Networks: Distributions, Patterns, and Models

    And we use Stochastic Kronecker Graph, which is a generative model to capture the core-periphery structure of a graph, to get the core strength. We find first, subgraphs with larger size have stronger core strength, second, with the increase in...