ITRS 2001 Main template for Prod Equipment

ITRS 2001 Main template for Prod Equipment

2003 ITRS Factory Integration Chapter Production Equipment Backup Section Details and Assumptions for Technology Requirements and Potential Solutions 9/15/01 ITRS Factory Integration TWG 1 Production Equipment Backup Outline 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 20/01/31 Contributors How Metrics were Selected SEMATECH and ITRS Metrics Alignment Equipment Configurations Facilities and Standards Integration Process Control Systems Suggested University and Industry Research for 2004+ ITRS Factory Integration TWG

2 Contributors to Production Equipment 9/15/01 Don Martin (IBM) Mani Janakiram (Intel) Martin Haller (Infineon) John Fowler (ASU) Donald Hicks (UT-Dallas) Mike Schwartz (ISMT) Shantha Mohan (Consultant) Raja Sunkara (National) Eric Christensen (AMD) John Plummer (Consultant) Abol Taghizadeh (Tefen)

Hiromi Yajima (Toshiba) Ashwin Ghatalia (Phillips) Dev Pillai (Intel) Arieh Greenberg (Infineon) Arnie Steinman (ION Systems) Court Skinner (Consultant) Eric Englhardt (AMAT) Shige Kobayashi (Renesas) Jeff Pettinato (Intel) Junji Iwasaki (Renesas) Michio Honma (NEC Electronics) ITRS Factory Integration TWG 3 How Metrics were selected Almost every metric is a best in class or close to best in class Sources are: Rob Leachmans published 200mm benchmarking data, Individual IC maker feedback, and I300I Factory Guidelines for 300mm tool productivity It is likely a factory will not achieve all the metrics outlined in the

roadmap concurrently Individual business models will dictate which metric is more important than others It is likely certain metrics may be sacrificed (periodically) for attaining other metrics (Example: OEE/Utilization versus Cycle time) The Factory Integration metrics are not as tightly tied to technology nodes as in other chapters such as Lithography However, nodes offer convenient interception points to bring in new capability, tools, software and other operational potential solutions Inclusion of each metric is dependent on consensus agreement We think the metrics provide a good summary of stretch goals for most companies in todays challenging environment. 20/01/31 ITRS Factory Integration TWG 4 International SEMATECH Metrics Alignment Rev 1 09/06/03 9/15/01

ITRS Factory Integration TWG 5 ITRS/ISMT Metrics Alignment Objective & Status Align 300mm metrics definitions that are collected for ISMT with those for the ITRS for consistency Status: Done and Agreed for 37 metrics by ISMT. ITRS sync on production equipment in progress. Expect to complete the alignment by the end of the 2003 ITRS roadmap year in September Long term objective (2004+) is to develop a process where best in class metrics can be collected globally by SIA or an independent equivalent and used for ITRS synchronization 09/06/03 Industry Best in Class (BIC) Data sharing proposal will not occur in 2003 and will be contingent on number of global 300mm Fabs for 2004 JEITA (Japan) is ok with the concept, however, since there is only 1 300mm Fab (Renesas/Trecenti), all of their values will be lined to that fab. Timing is key for them

Taiwan TSIA has agreed to discuss, but FtF has been pushed to August due to SARS Need to close on SIA willingness to manage cross regional data AR for Jeff to close by September FtF 6 300mm Metrics Sync Agreement with ITRS Summary of Approvals from MMC/PAG/Council FtF Meetings ISMT has agreed to definitions for 36 combined operations, production equipment and AMHS metrics (see slide xx for summary) ISMT will use three process technology nodes for 300mm Fabs: 1) >130nm, 2) =130nm and 3) < 130nm ITRS defines current node as 90nm and this will be the focus for future BIC calculations Use minimum printed image on a process recipe to define technology nodes Example: Use minimum printed image on Poly, Contacts or Isolation (DRAM) layers ITRS defines 130nm node as having 24 layers Please direct any questions or comments to

09/06/03 Mike Schwartz -> (512) 356-3926; [email protected] Jeff Pettinato -> (480) 554-4077; [email protected] 7 ISMT and ITRS Metrics Synchronization Equipment Metrics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Total Litho Aligns / Day DUV 248nm Scanner Aligns / Day 193 Scanner Aligns / Day

PVD Metal Dep Outs / Day Metal etch Outs / Day Implant (HC) Outs / Day Implant (MC) Outs / Day Implant (HE) Outs / Day CMP Oxide Outs / Day CMP W Outs / Day CMP Cu Outs / Day Copper plating Outs / Day CVD ILD Outs / Day CVD Low K Outs / Day k<2.8 Spin On Low K Outs / Day Cu barrier seed Outs / Day Availability E10 (Litho, ILD Etch, Cu CMP, Cu Plating, Cu Barrier/Seed, CVD Dialectric) 18. Utilization (Litho, ILD Etch, Cu CMP, Cu Plating, Cu Barrier/Seed, CVD Dialectric) 09/06/03 Operational Metrics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Production Cycle Time Hot Lot Cycle Time Direct H/C (Aligns / Day) Indirect H/C (Aligns / Day Non Product Wafer Starts Usage Gas/Chemical cost / litho align Space Effectiveness (layers-wspm / mfg area) 8. Non-Product Wafer Starts Usage (# non-revenue AMHS Metrics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. generating starts / total wafer starts) 9. Non-Product Wafer Starts Usage (# non-revenue

Supplier Focused Storage MTTR Interbay Transport MTTR Intrabay Transport MTTR # Storage Cycles between Failure # Interbay Transport Cycles between Failure # Intrabay Transport Cycles between Failure Interbay Throughput Design (Moves / Hour) 8. wafers processed / total wafers processed) Intrabay Throughput (Moves / Hour) 1. 2. Design Capable vs. actuals Design Capable vs. actuals General Factory

# Intrabay Transport Cycles between Failure [Total System] Avg. Fab Wide Carrier Delivery Time 8 Aligner Productivity Photo Alignments Completed per aligner per Work Day The average number of photo wafer alignments performed per machine per work day (over the quarter), taking into account all photo wafer alignments tools in the factory Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fractions if aligner only available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) 9 248nm Scanner Productivity- I Line Photo Alignments Completed Per 248nm Scanner Per Work Day

The average number of photo wafer alignments performed per machine per work day, considering only photo wafer alignments performed on 248nm Scanners in the Fab Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fractions if aligner only available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) 10 193nm Scanner Productivity Photo Alignments Completed per 193nm Scanner per Work Day The average number of photo wafer alignments performed per machine per work day, considering only photo wafer alignments performed on 193nm Scanners in the Fab Notes:

09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fractions if stepper available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) 11 PVD Productivity PVD Metal Deposition Outs per Day per System Total number PVD metal deposition moves completed per day per system. Metal deposition refers to all processes in PVD tools eg: interconnect, salicide, Ti/TiN barrier.Do not include copper processes Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engr.wafers (optional), no monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# chambers/tool 12

Metal Etch Productivity Dry Metal Etch Outs per Day per System Total number Dry or non-wet metal etch moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# chambers/tool Metal interconnect levels only 13 High Current Implant Productivity High Current Implant Outs per Day per System Total number high current implant moves completed per day per system. Notes:

09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# chambers/tool 14 Mid Current Implant Productivity Mid Current Implant Outs per Day per System Total number mid current implant moves completed per day per system. Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new

installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# chambers/tool 15 High Energy Implant Productivity High Energy Implant Outs per Day per System Total number high energy implant moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# chambers/tool 16 CMP Oxide Productivity CMP Oxide Outs per Day per System Total number CMP Oxide moves completed per day per system

Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# heads/tool 17 CMP W Productivity CMP W Wafer Outs per Day per System Total number CMP W wafer moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03

Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# heads/tool 18 CMP Cu Productivity CMP Cu Wafer Outs per Day per System Total number CMP Cu wafer moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not -# heads/tool 19

Copper Plating Productivity Copper Plating Outs per Day per System Total number Copper Plating moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not - # heads/tool 20 CVD ILD Productivity CVD ILD Outs per Day per System ILD = Inter Level Metal Dielectric Total number CVD ILD moves completed per day per system. ILD refers to inter-level metal dielectric. Typically k>/= 2.8

Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not - # heads/tool 21 CVD Low k (<2.8) Productivity Low k Outs per Day per System- CVD Total number Low k moves completed per day per system by CVD Notes: 09/06/03

Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not - # heads/tool 22 Spin-On Low k (<2.8) Productivity Low k Outs per Day per System- Spin on Total number Low k moves completed per day per system by Spin on Process Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not - # heads/tool 23

PVD Copper Barrier/Seed Productivity PVD Copper Barrier/Seed Outs per Day per System Total number PVD Copper Barrier/Seed moves completed per day per system Notes: 09/06/03 Rework not included Include production wafers, engineering wafers (optional) No monitor wafers Can use fraction if system available part time (new installations only -not down for repairs) System is complete tool not - # heads/tool 24 Process Equipment Availability Availability defined as 100% - (scheduled + unscheduled downtime) as per SEMI E10 Calculate as a yearly benchmark for following tools:

193nm Scanner 248nm Scanner Damascene ILD etch Cu CMP Cu Plating Cu barrier/seed Intermetal level dielectric (CVD) Notes: 09/06/03 Measure availability for cluster tools at the chamber level How to calculate chamber aggregate level? 25 Facilities and Standards Integration with Production Equipment 09/06/03 26 Prod Equipment New backup foils based on Facilities WG inputs Design tools to operate within mainstream facilities services

capabilities Heat load removal by increased use of Process Cooling Water Drive 3-5 most important tool installation standards including pass/fail criteria test methods Production equipment must Not be affected by use of mainstream wireless technologies (cell phones, pagers, PDA, etc) Predictable & consistent tool connection for Utilities, Drains, Exhaust, Interconne Side view (Prod Equip) Use higher efficiency (higher Voltage not current) power distribution. (> 480V, 3 phase, today most are 208V, single phase, very high curren Raised floor Physical Separation of waste streams See Next Page for

Additional Details 09/06/03 Shadow footprint in sub-fab Sub-fab space: support equipment must fit into shadow footprint as determined by prime manufacturing area 27 Feedback to Prod Equip Team from Facilities # Process Tool Focus Area 1 Process tool heat load removal by increased use of process cooling water (PCW) versus todays convention air cooling methods. 2 Process tools to use higher efficiency power distribution systems (increase usage of 480V, 3 and reduce the usage of 208V, single ) 3 Physical separation of (liquid) waste-streams at the tool Rationale Today, in many functional areas,

large volumes of HEPA air is used to remove the heat radiating from the process tool. Water-cooling is much more cost effective. Higher efficiency power (480V, 3 ) is more cost effective that 208V, single . (by a factor of 1.732?) What this means High KW tool designs optimized around PCW heat removal methods versus current convective designs. Issues/Caution/Next Steps Should be modeled and verified to validate contention If the tool is a very high KW tool, investigate change to 480V, 3 power. Proceed with extreme caution as some suppliers have put step down transformers within tool footprint and made it worse than 208V approach Some tools being delivered with a Each waste stream must be separate Should be based on waste steam type single waste-stream manifold and distinct at each tool. versus a blanket approach. Blanket

design approach may result in un-necessary lines being installed. 4 Sub-fab support equipment Today, there are several support Tool supplier must consider sub-fab Must not make cleanroom footprint larger to must fit into the shadow equipment such as powerfootprint designs rather than just accommodate the subfab size. Also, when footprint as determined by supplies & point of use devices cleanroom footprint. growing tool height, it must stay within footprint consumed by prime that is starting to consume more height restriction of 200mm fabs. manufacturing area (in the footprint in sub-fab than in cleanroom) cleanroom. (Tee Pee) 5 Process and metrology tools Manufacturing equipment Develop environmental RF parameter Parameter specs and testing methods must be immune to mainstream performance should not be specs that tool suppliers agree to. needed. wireless technologies usage in negatively impacted if wireless cleanroom devices (cell phones, pagers, PDA, etc) 6 Predictable and consistent tool As-built configurations of delivered Tool drawings must be consistent Leverage IC maker and Supplier connections for utilities, drains, tools do not often match the tool with as-built configurations

connectivity e-Manufacturing solutions for exhausts and interconnects drawings (location on the tool, this capability sizes, and other specs). 7 Select future tools may need higher than normal operating environmental cleanliness for preventive maintenance 8 Tool weights approaching the limits of the facilitys live load carrying capacity 09/06/03 Fab cleanliness spec of Class Tool designs to comprehend design 100 to 1000 may not support for maintenance focus when certain kinds of maintenance operating in a less clean environment. when the chamber is opened and serviced. Certain tools such as EUV Scanner could likely stress most facilitys live load carrying capacity. 28 Production Equipment Standards Enhanced parallel I/O

standard for ceiling based transporters Integrated mini-environment standards Buffering standards for continuous operation Reticle carrier & loadport standards Wafer & carrier standards Carrier environment standards Carrier ID standards Loadport standards PGV docking standards Enhanced parallel I/O standard for ground based transporters 09/06/03

Production Equipment (side view) Rear userinterface standards Standards for safety countermeasures Isolation standards for equipment maintenance Equipment footprint & height management standards Legend: -> Standards Exist -> Standards Are Under Development -> Standards Are Needed 29 Future Equipment Configurations 09/06/03 30 Type 1: Carrier Level integrated Flow and Control Sorter & Metrology with Stockers OHT Loop

Metro Tools OHT Loop Stockers Process Tools Stocker Sorter Metro Metro Tools Sorter Metro Process Tools Stocker robot interfaces directly with Sorters and Metro equip Stocker robot loads Sorters and Metro equipment Loadports End View Potential Solutions Require: Standardized Intrabay Operation

Integrated Software High reliability equipment 09/06/03 When Solutions Are Needed: Research Required in 2001 Development Underway by 2002 Qualification/Production by 2003 31 Type 2-1 Wafer Level Integrated Flow and Control Connected EFEM Equipment Supplier A Equipment Supplier B Equipment Supplier C Wafer Staging Carrier Staging Potential Solutions Require: I/F Standard (H/W, S/W) Standardized EFEM

Software Integrated Wafer level APC Standardized Intrabay Operation When Solutions Are Needed: Research Required by 2002 Development Underway by 2004 Qualification/Production by 2005 Conceptual Only 09/06/03 32 Type 2-2 Wafer Level Integrated Flow and Control Expanded EFEM Standard Tool Widths Potential Solutions Require: System controller of Equipment Group Wafer Dispatcher Module structure of equipment Standardized I/F Standardized Width Modular Process Steps High Speed Wafer Transfer Standardized Intrabay Operation When Solutions Are Needed: Research Required by 2003

Development Underway by 2005 Qualification/Production by 2006 Conceptual Only 09/06/03 33 Type 2-3: Wafer Level Integrated Flow and Control Continuous EFEM (Revolving Sushi Bar) Single Wafer Conceptual Only Wafer Transport Carrier Level Transport Stocker Multi-Wafer Carrier Single Chamber Process Tool Metrology Tool Target 450mm

09/06/03 Potential Solutions Require: Ultra High Speed Wafer Transfer Target M/C to M/C 7sec. Wafer Level Dispatching When Solutions Are Needed: Research Required by 2007 Development Underway by 2010 Qualification/Production by 2013 34 Process Control Systems 09/06/03 35 Future Equipment & Automation Capabilities Development in 2001 [with standards]. Qualification/Production by 2005 Manufacturing Execution System (MES) Operations Data WIP Tool Control

MCS Dispatch Integrated APC/Yield Data & Systems Run To Run FDC SPC Yield PCS SECS/GEM Control Line Equipment & Process Data Equipment Data Acquisition (EDA) Standards Line Today 100 variables @ 3 Hz each = 300 values per sec Future EDA Goal 500 variables @10 Hz each = 10,000 values per sec

Automation System Capabilities Equipment Capabilities 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Data Sharable between APC applications High data transfer rates Single point configurations Integrated yield, process control, and operational systems 5. Rapid application development (run to run algorithms, etc.) 09/06/03 Standardized data and connectivity Fast sensor sampling & data transfer rates Host ability to stop processing as needed Graceful recovery when a fault occurs Ability to change parameters and values between wafers

6. Wafer tracking all points within the tool 36 Research Opportunities 09/06/03 37 Research Summary Page Title FORCe II Program (SRC, ISMT, NSF) 09/06/03 Objective Conduct university research, directed by SRC/ISMT MC in order to address factory operations and production equipment challenges as indicted in ITRS FI Area Various: Equipment utilization versus Cycle time, Set up reduction (High Mix), Planning, Scheduling, Modeling, PM, Data analytics, etc.

38 Proposed Research Details Title: FORCe II Objective and Industry Benefit: Conduct university research, directed by SRC/ISMT MC in order to address factory operations (main) and production equipment challenges as indicted in ITRS FI Key Deliverables: Solutions in the form of software tools, algorithm, commercialization and qualified students for hire Timeline: 3 years, starting from 2004 Resources and Funding Needed: $1M per year for 3 years Potential Funding Sources: NSF, SRC and ISMT will be funding this equally 09/06/03 39 FORCe II Research Topics 1.Performance improvements for simulation models for full factory with and without AMHS (inter-bay, intra-bay, and future direct transport systems) for both wafer and reticle delivery in fabs 2.Factory labor modeling tools appropriate for alternative labor deployment strategies under various automation conditions of: 1) No AMHS, 2) Interbay AMHS, 3) Interbay & intrabay AMHS 3.Operational control of equipment and fab output and cycle time variability. Including scheduling and preventative maintenance (PM). 4.Supply Chain, specific focus areas to include sourcing models, demand planning and modeling 5.Improving equipment efficiency for high mix factories 6.Backend solutions including - final wafer operations or bond, assembly, test of chips 7.Future factor design, including plug-and-play design and single wafer processing 8.Improving AMHS system throughput for interbay and intrabay 9.Financial/cost attributes in modeling (various business models, wafer cost, mask cost, etc.)

10.Factory of the future (breakthrough/disruptive technologies, single wafer processing, direct transport, etc.) 11.Innovative factory data analysis techniques including, consideration of high data volume, data analysis and data mining of factory data 12. High risk/exploratory projects in the area of factory operations addressing all the key areas (beyond 2007 needs) 09/06/03 40 Process Equipment Utilization Utilization defined as Operational Efficiency as per SEMI E10, which is defined as (Production Time) / (Available Time) Calculate as a yearly benchmark for following tools: 193nm Scanner 248nm Scanner Damascene ILD etch Cu CMP Cu Plating

Cu barrier/seed Intermetal level dielectric (CVD) Notes: 09/06/03 Measure utilization for cluster tools at the chamber level How to calculate chamber aggregate level? 41

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