Embedding Discourse into the Classroom Presenter Information We

Embedding Discourse into the Classroom Presenter Information We recommend that if your fee structure allows, assure that each participant has a copy of the book. In order to maintain intellectual property rights and adhere to copyright requirements the presenter must own a

copy of Academic Conversations Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings by Jeff Zwiers and Marie Crawford Learning Targets I can cite reasons for embedding discourse into my classroom. I can apply the why, what and how of discourse to my classroom.

I can use protocols to structure discourse with my students. Small Fires Gather in a small group with chairs only (knee to knee) Choose a starter/recorder Each person at the table tells: Name Role

How you feel about being here (positive and negative) Your expectations Starter will give summary of table responses to large group Voices in the Room Using a Black Marker write everything you currently

know about Discourse. Discourse Frame of Reference Circle Map Share Knee to Knee Partner. Take turns sharing what you wrote on

your Circle Map about discourse. You may add items from your partner using a marker color other than black. You may also cross out any items that the dialogue with your partner has caused you to revise your thinking. What is Discourse?

Definition of Discourse Academic oral discourse is communication of thought by words, talk, and conversation. It includes purposeful reflection and collaboration. students ask one another about their thinking and build on the responses of others. They cite evidence, ask for elaborations and clarifications, and extend understandings by

using the statements they have heard from their classmates to form new ideas. Content-Area Conversations (ASCD, 2008) by Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey and Carol Rothenberg Circle of Voices Read the definition of discourse Pick out a key word, key point, or phrase that is significant to you Form a large circle when directed

Participants randomly say their key word, point, or phrase Some points will be repeated (and thats okay) Activity is completed when everyone shares once Why Discourse? Common Core State Standards

SL.CCR.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. SL.CCR.3 Evaluate a speakers point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. Discourse in the classroom is less than 2 minutes an hour and even less

for struggling students. Wilhelm and Smith, 2012 Student-Centered Discussion: https:// www.teachingchannel.org/videos/stra tegies-for-student-centered-discussio n (7minutes)

What the Research Says About Discourse? Becoming an Expert on Reasons for Discourse Activity 1. At your table are 23 cards with reasons for embedding discourse. 2. Distribute the cards equally among the people at your table.

3. As you read your assigned reason cards, record on your reason handout key points, ideas, etc. When directed you will be sharing these with others at your table. Expert Share 1. Pick a starter. 2. Round One: 1. Starter gives key points, ideas, etc. for one of

their reason cards. 2. Others in the group record on their handout notes from that reason. 3. Continue sharing and recording until all members at the table have shared their key points, ideas, etc. for one of their reason cards. 3. Repeat rounds until all 23 reason cards have been shared and recorded.

Reason Categorizing Activity 1. Based on what you know so far are there any patterns that you see emerging for why we should embed discourse in the classroom? 2. Discuss at your table. 3. Now, using the reason title cards at your table and your notes from the previous activity, sort the reason cards into categories determined by your table group. 4. Write the title for your categories on index

cards and place above each grouping. Break Museum Walk Based on what you just learned, what are your top four reasons for embedding discourse into your classroom?

Record in the blank box on your reason handout. Table Share. What Does Discourse Look Like? A Model for Success for All Students Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Teacher Responsibility Whole Group - Model I do it Guided Instruction We do it Collaboration

Independent Student Responsibility You do it together You do it alone What Does Discourse Feel Like?

Collaborative Conversations Add directions for collaborative conversation protocol Discourse Moves Discourse Moves Expert Groups Read your assigned skill Elaborate and Clarify pg. 45

Support Ideas With Examples pg. 47 Build on or Challenge a Partners Idea pg. 51 Paraphrase pg. 53 Synthesize Conversation Points pg. 55

Meet with others who read the same skill Decide on key points Go back to home table Each person presents their skill to others at their table Video 1st Viewing of the Video As you watch this video, listen for 5

discourse skills/moves Elaborate and Clarify Support Ideas With Examples Build on or Challenge a Partners Idea Paraphrase Synthesize Conversation Points Record your observations on the discourse moves placemat

Example of Classroom Discourse https://www.teachingchannel.org/vid eos/teaching-the-n-word Discourse Placemat 1st Viewing Video Discussion Share what your findings from the video

What did you notice? What did you not notice? Behind the Scenes Look As you watch this video a 2nd time think about what this teacher and the students did in order to reach this level of discussion? Take notes on the back of your

placemat. As a table group record your groups findings on chart paper. Post on the wall Example of Classroom Discourse https://www.teachingchannel.org/vid eos/teaching-the-n-word

Structured Conversations Using Text Sets Developing Your Own Text Sets Give them time to work on this Power of Discourse

Piles of Random Thoughts Vs Constructed Ideas Zwiers and Crawford, 2011 Stand up. Make eye contact with someone you dont know. Discuss: What does this mean? Be prepared to share.

Definition of Discourse Academic oral discourse is communication of thought by words, talk, and conversation. It includes purposeful reflection and collaboration. students ask one another about their thinking and build on the responses of others. They cite evidence, ask for elaborations and clarifications, and extend understandings by using the statements they have heard from

their classmates to form new ideas. Content-Area Conversations (ASCD, 2008) by Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey and Carol Rothenberg A Snapshot of the Cognitive Rigor Matrix (Hess, Carlock, Jones, & Walkup, 2009) Depth of Thinking (Webb) + Type of Thinking

(Revised Bloom, 2001) DOK Level 1 Recall & Reproduction DOK Level 2 Basic Skills & Concepts

DOK Level 3 Strategic Thinking & Reasoning DOK Level 4 Extended Thinking Remember

- Recall, locate basic facts, definitions, details, events Understand - Select appropriate words for use when intended meaning is clearly evident

- Specify, explain relationships - summarize identify central ideas - Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence (quote, text evidence,

example) - Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains or concepts Apply - Use language structure

(pre/suffix) or word relationships (synonym/antonym) to determine meaning Use context to identify word meanings - Obtain and interpret information using text features

- Use concepts to solve non-routine problems - Devise an approach among many alternatives to research a novel problem Analyze

Compare literary elements, facts, terms, - Identify the kind of events information contained in a Analyze format, graphic, table, visual, etc. organization, & text structures

-Analyze or interpret authors craft (e.g., literary devices, viewpoint, or potential bias) to critique a text Analyze multiple sources or texts - Analyze complex/

abstract themes Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for conjectures based on one text or problem - Evaluate relevancy, accuracy, & completeness

of information across texts/ sources -Develop a complex model for a given situation -Develop an alternative solution -Synthesize information

across multiple sources or texts -Articulate a new voice, alternate theme, new knowledge or perspective Evaluate Create

- Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience

Red Skelton Explicating The Pledge of Allegiance http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZBTyT WOZCM Explicating the Meaning of Discourse

Paulo Freire was concerned with praxis action that is informed (and linked to certain values). Dialogue wasnt just about deepening understanding but was part of making a difference in the world. Dialogue in itself is a co-operative activity involving respect. The process is important and can be seen as enhancing community and building social capital and to leading us to act in ways that make for justice and human flourishing. http://infed.org/mobi/paulo-freire-dialogue-praxis-and-educ

ation/ Quotes Conservations not only made us sound smarter, I think they actually made us smarter.

Science wasnt very interesting until we started talking about it. It was weird. When we finished, we had a totally new idea.

When we talked to each other, we put our brains together, we become one big smart! The book was only so-so, but our conversations about it were awesome.

We were still talking about history when class was over! Teacher Quotes from the Group What will discourse do for your students? What will discourse do for your

teaching? How will discourse enhance your content? What impact will discourse have on student learning? How will discourse change the world Resources Socratic Circles Fostering Critical

and Creative Thinking in Middle an d High School by Matt Copeland Academic Conversations Classroo m Talk That Fosters Critical Thinki ng and Content Understandings by Jeff Zwiers and Marie Crawford Inside the Black Box, 2nd Edition, Black and Wiliam Conversation: The Comprehension

Connection Choice Words, Peter Johnston Opening Minds, Peter Johnston http:// thehawnfoundation.org/sites/default/ files/Durlak_Weissberg_Meta-analysis %20of%20SEL%20Programs_CD_201 1.pdf

Examples of Classroom Discourse https://www.teachingchannel.org/vid eos/teaching-the-n-word https://www.teachingchannel.org/vid eos/using-socratic-seminars-in-classr oom https://www.teachingchannel.org/vid eos/literacy-analysis-lesson Protocol Resources

http://www.nsrfharmony.org/protocol/ a_z.html Adaptive Schools

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