BasicFBA Unpacked A review of the most helpful

BasicFBA Unpacked A review of the most helpful

BasicFBA Unpacked A review of the most helpful (and cheapest) FBA resource on the internet Jon Burt M.Ed. BCBA University of Louisville March 6-7, 2017 www.basicFBA.com Chris Borgmeier Sheldon Loman, Portland State University Kathleen Strickland-Cohen, Texas Christian University

CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/ClassroomWide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tier 3: Common Issues

Too many students with challenging behavior Lack of personnel with sufficient training to conduct FBA and use FBA information to identify function-based interventions Student plans built by specialist without input from/collaboration with plan implementers Teaming context and routines arent in place to support specialist with plan implementation Plan implementers need a better understanding of behavioral function Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) is. an empirically supported practice that has been demonstrated to improve

both the effectiveness & efficiency of behavioral interventions in schools Blair, Umbreit, & Bos, 1999; Carr et al., 1999; Ingram, Lewis-Palmer, & Sugai, 2005; Lee, Sugai, & Horner, 1999; Loman & Horner, 2013; Newcomer & Lewis, 2004, Strickland-Cohen & Horner, in press. Basic FBA to BSP The most important purpose of conducting FBA is to inform the development of Behavior Support Plans that directly address the FUNCTION of student behavior

FBA-BSP in Schools: How are we doing? Growing body of research showing that FBA can be effectively conducted by typical school personnel (Crone, Hawken, & Bergstrom, 2007; Dukes, Rosenberg, & Brady, 2007; Loman, 2010; Maag & Larson, 2004; Renshaw et al., 2008; Scott, Nelson, & Zabala, 2003) However schools continue to struggle to utilize FBA information to build and effectively implement BSPs (Blood & Neel, 2007; Cook et al., 2007, 2012; Scott & Kamps, 2007; Scott, Liaupsin, Nelson, & McIntyre, 2005;

A Continuum of Individualized Support Many of problem behaviors that teams encounter do not require comprehensive FBA-BSP Using simplified FBA-BSP procedures that match the level and intensity of problem behavior Provide FBS at the first signs of persistent problem behavior Basic FBA: Behaviors and Maintaining Functions are Easily Defined and Identified

Complex FBA: Behaviors and Maintaining Functions Vary, and are not Easily Defined and/or Identified Basic vs. Complex FBA/BSP Focus of this training series Basic Complex

For: Students with mild to moderate problem behaviors (behaviors that are NOT dangerous or occurring in many settings) Students with moderate to severe behavioral problems; may be dangerous and/or occurring in many settings What:

Relatively Simple and Efficient process for behavior support planning based on practical FBA data Time-intensive process that involves emergency planning, familycentered planning, and collaboration with outside agencies Developed by whom: Team of school-based

professionals (e.g., PBS team members whose job responsibilities include FBA and behavior support planning) School-based team including professionals trained to develop and implement intensive interventions for students with severe problem behaviors (e.g., behavior specialist) 9

Building District Capacity This will require re-examining how we organize behavioral support at the district level (Strickland-Cohen, Loman, & Horner, in press) Identify and train personnel at Each School who can lead the Basic FBA/BSP process Train all school personnel a Function-Based approach to understanding, preventing, and addressing challenging behavior Basic FBA to BSP Training

Module 1- Defining and Understanding Behavior*** Module 2- FBA: Practice Interviewing Module 3- FBA: Practice Observing Module 4- Critical Features of BSP*** Module 5- Building BSP from FBA Module 6- Implementation Planning & Leading a BSP Team Module 7- Evaluation & BSP Review ***Designed for all school staff to complete

Building Capacity: Function-Based Thinking in Schools In addition to training 1-2 professionals per school to use Basic FBA/BSP We want to provide all school personnel with training in the Basics of Behavior and a function-based approach to addressing challenging behavior Basic FBA to BSP www.basicfba.com www.basicfba.com

www.basicfba.com Online Module Features Pre and Post Assessment for Each Module Participant Guide and Materials to Follow Along and Practice Using Forms/Tools Interactive Activities with built in Checks for Understanding Embedded video to model interviewing Embedded video for practicing observations Links to data collection and graphing Big Ideas

Learn FBA & BSP in manageable chunks a series of seven 90 minute modules intended to be delivered about 1 module every 2 weeks Interactive Training Activities -- Learn through demonstration & practice application activities Homework Tasks with each module for real-world practice that culminate in implementation of a BSP developed from an FBS Tools for Coaching & Feedback on Homework Tools for building school-wide understanding of behavior & function-based intervention Participants Guide for each Module Objectives

Review Activities Checks for Understanding Comments/ Questions Tasks Key Points Basic FBA to BSP

Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 1: Defining & Understanding Behavior www.basicfba.com Module 1 Objectives By the end of this module you should be able to: 1. Define observable behavior (What). 2. Identify events that predict When & Where the specific behavior occurs. 3. Identify Why a student engages in the specific

behavior. 4. Construct hypothesis statements that summarize the What, When, Where, & Why of a students behavior Always Start by Defining the Problem Behavior 2 1 3

Antecedents/Triggers Behavior: Consequence/Function When _____happens. the student does (what)__ ..and as a result ______ Scenario #4.3 After interviewing Johnnys teacher and conducting several

observations, Johnnys team determined that when seated next to peers during less structured class time (free time, cooperative group art projects, etc.), Johnny tears up his paper and stomps his feet. After Johnny engages in this behavior his peers laugh at him. Less structured class time Routine: During ______________________ Antecedent/Trigger: When Behavior: Student does Consequence/Outcome:

and as a result Peers laugh Seated next to peers Tears up paper & stomps feet Therefore, the function of the behavior is to: get/avoid Peer Attention

21 Example from the On-line Module Key Points from Module 1 (p. 1.11 ) In understanding the ABCs of behavior, the starting point is the behavior (B), then what happens before the behavior (A) and after the behavior (C). Behaviors need to be explained in an observable & measurable way, so that anyone who does not know that student could point out the behavior. All behavior serves a function: either to OBTAIN or AVOID something (attention, activities, or tangible items).

Task (p. 1.12) Over the next weeks 1. Select a student in your school who has persistent problem behavior that is not dangerous. Identify: Complete the ABC Tracker (p. 1.13) for that student Whenever you see an occurrence of the problem behavior each day, write down the A-B-C on the tracker form At the end of the week, or after seeing 5-6 occurrences of the behavior, form a Summary Statement at the bottom of the page 2. Remember to use A-B-C to inform Possible Motivation when completing referral forms

Basic FBA to BSP Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 2: Asking About Behavior: FBA Interviewing www.basicfba.com Module 2 Objectives Using the FACTS interviews with staff and students to specify: 1. The problem behaviors

2. Routines in which problem behaviors occur 3. Triggers or predictors of the problem behavior 4. Pay-off (Function) the behaviors have for student 5. Possible setting events 6.Summary of behavior FACTS Part A (see p 2.4) Start with the Student Strengths Strengths

Routines Analysis Conduct Routines Analysis to identify routines where problem behavior occurs 29 Video Example: FBA Interview Identifying Antecedents Watch the video and follow along on the

completed FACTS form in the participants guide (p. 2.15) 30 www.basicfba.com Live Trainings Module 2 Training Materials Videos available on YouTube or

for Download 31 On-line Training Sample 32 On-line Training Sample 33 FACTS Part B (see p 2.5) Antecedents

Interview to ID Antecedents & Consequences in prioritized routines from Part-A Summarize the interview and get a Confidence Rating from the respondent Consequences

Summary Statement & Confidence Rating 34 Interview - Antecedents ANTECEDENT(s): Rank Order the strongest triggers/predictors of problem behavior in the routine above. Then ask corresponding follow-up question(s) to get a detailed understanding of triggers ranked #1 & 2. Environmental Features (Rank order strongest 2) Follow Up Questions Get as Specific as possible 1 X a. task too hard

If a,b,c,d or e - describe task/demand in detail __writing sentences, paragraphs, letters, journals, etc. student cannot write because they dont know how to read or spell fluently______________________ If f - describe purpose of correction, voice tone, volume etc. _________________________________________________ If g, h, I, j or k - describe setting/activity/content in detail ____Independent work involving writing or reading; works better in small groups if he doesnt have to read or write____________ _________________________________________________ If l what peers? ___ g. large group instruction ___ b. task too easy

___ h. small group work _X_ c. bored w/ task ___ i. unstructured time _X_ d. task too long ___ j. transitions ___ e. physical demand 2_X k. independent work 3_X f. correction/reprimand ___ l. with peers ___ m. Other, describe ______________________ _______________________________________ MAKE SURE THAT YOU GET A CLEAR AND SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION OF THE ANTECEDENT Task too hard is NOT specific enough to inform intervention

Activity 5 (page 2.16- 2.17) Write the Target Routine and Problem Behavior on the FACTS Part-B Next, Listen to the audio clip and complete the ANTECEDENTS section in the FACTS Part-B for Tracy (pg. 2.17) Key Points from Module 2 (p. 2.21) To obtain information to make a hypothesis/summary statement you need to ASK & SEE. The FACTS is a tool used to interview teachers & staff to narrow the focus of a students problem behavior FACTS Part-A: Start with the strengths & identify routines

where problem behavior occurs FACTS Part-B: Interview based on prioritized routines & stick to it Summarize interview with respondent and have them rate the confidence of the statement Task (p. 2.21) This week, conduct a FACTS interview with a staff member that is very familiar with a student you identified for conducting the FBA and developing a behavior support plan Give yourself 30-45 minutes to complete the interview

Basic FBA to BSP Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 3: Seeing Behavior FBA Observations www.basicfba.com Module 3 Objectives Utilize information obtained from FACTS interview(s) to plan for observations. Observe students within routines identified by the FACTS interview(s) Observe to test the Summary of Behavior

obtained from the FACTS interview Practice using ABC Recording Form. ABC Observation An ABC observation involves observing the student in identified routine(s) [From interview] Purpose of ABC observation is to: -confirm the accuracy of the teacher interview summary of behavior -identify antecedents and outcomes that the teacher may have overlooked -verify the function of the students behavior -develop the most accurate Summary Statement for

intervention development ABC Recording Form www.basicfba.com Module 3 Live Training Videos available via YouTube or for Download

Eddies ABC Recording Form Tallying Consequence /Function Trend = Adult Attn (7 of 14) After the observation: Summarize Results from ABC Observation

2. Use the tallies to help inform your Summary of Behavior Activity 2: Practice observation for TRACY (pp. 3.7-3.8) 1. Record TRACYs behavior from video using the ABC recording form (p. 3.7) that you prepared in the previous activity. 2. Summarize the data from your observation. 3. Rate how likely it is that this Summary accurately explains the identified behavior occurring (1-6).

Key Points from Part 3 (p. 3.23) ABC Observations are used to confirm the accuracy of the FACTS/ teacher interview Use the FACTS summary statement to guide when and where to conduct ABC observation

Start by recording the behavior, then write what happened directly before (Antecedent) and after (Consequence) the behavior Immediately after the observation check boxes that correspond with activities, antecedents, & consequences recorded Summarize results & compare with the FACTS summary statement Task

(p. 3.23) This week, conduct an ABC Observation using the ABC Recording form for the same student that you completed the FACTS interview for last week. Give yourself 20-30 minutes to conduct the observation. Remember, you need to be convinced. Basic FBA to BSP Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior

Module 4: Critical Features of BSP www.basicfba.com Module 4 Objectives Use a Competing Behavior Pathway to Identify Function-based behavior supports that: Teach positive behaviors to replace problem behavior Use strategies to prevent problem behavior & prompt positive behaviors Reinforce replacement & desired behaviors Effectively respond to problem behaviors by redirecting & minimizing their pay-off

Critical Features of BSP see p. 4.7 Replace problem behavior by Teaching a socially acceptable, efficient behavior that allows student to obtain the pay-off/function Prevent problem behaviors by directly addressing triggers & prompting replacement behaviors based on the function of behavior Reinforce replacement & desired behaviors based on function/pay off for the student Redirect problem behaviors by quickly & effectively redirecting student to replacement behavior Minimize Reinforcement by ensuring that problem behaviors do NOT pay off for the student (i.e. does not result in the function of behavior)

Key Points from Module 4: Critical Features of BSP Replace problem behavior by teaching a socially acceptable, efficient behavior that allows student to obtain the pay-off/function Prevent problem behaviors by directly addressing triggers & prompting replacement behaviors based on the function of behavior Reinforce replacement & desired behaviors based on function/pay off for the student Redirect problem behaviors by quickly & effectively redirecting student to replacement behavior Minimize Reinforcement by ensuring that problem behaviors do NOT pay off for

the student (i.e. does not result in the function of behavior) Task for Basic FBA to BSP team members Before beginning the next module complete the Competing Behavior Pathway & BSP Form (p. 4.6) to identify function-based interventions for the student for whom you conducted the FBA interviews and observations. Basic FBA to BSP

Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 5: Selecting Function-based Behavior Support Strategies www.basicfba.com Module 5 Objectives By the end of this Module Team Leaders will be able to: 1. Explain the differences between the Replacement Behavior and the Desired Behavior 2. Describe the different types of behavior support strategies/ interventions that must be included as part of the BSP 3. Discriminate between function-based and non-function-based teaching

and antecedent strategies 4. Identify function-based strategies for rewarding replacement/desired behavior AND minimizing the payoff for problem behavior 5. Label missing and incorrect components, when provided with sample behavior support plans Activity 3 (p. 5.8) Setting Event Interventions When asked to complete math worksheets, Kenny tears up the paper and throws it on the floor to avoid doing the task Hes more likely to do this when his daily schedule/routine has been disrupted (e.g. arrives late, assembly, testing) Identify the Setting Event &

Generate a neutralizing routine for this scenario Promoting Desired Behavior: Successive Approximations It is typically necessary to teach approximations of the desired behavior to move from the Replacement Behavior to the Desired Behavior. Build on small steps of success towards the desired behavior Use the function of behavior & the Competing Behavior Pathway as a guide With fluency, student is reinforced by natural reward Successive Approximations toward Desired

Behavior Dexter Antecedent: Task too difficult Asked to do multi-digit multiplication or division math worksheets Desired Behavior: Complete MultiDigit Math Problems independently

Approximation Step #3: Ask for teacher help Natural Consequence: Success on problems, more math tasks Approximation Step #2: With permission student can cross off 40% of difficult items Function:

Escape Difficult Math Tasks Approximation Step #1: Ask for break using only 3 break tokens per period Replacement Behavior: Ask for Break from Difficult Double Digit Tasks Key Points from Module 5 (p. 5.14) All BSPs must contain Preventive, Teaching and Reinforcement and Correction strategies. Setting Events can either be addressed through attempts to eliminate the setting event or by

setting up Neutralizing Routines A plan for encouraging students along a sequence of Approximations from the Replacement Behavior to the Desired Behavior will likely be necessary Task (p. 5.14) Over the next week Review and revise the interventions for your case: a) Make sure you have identified multiple function-based strategies for Prevention, Teaching, Reinforcement and Correction interventions b) Identify Setting Event interventions as appropriate c) Develop a draft of Successive Approximations and

generate ideas for how you will begin teaching the skills necessary to support your student to move toward the Desired Behavior 61 Basic FBA to BSP Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 6: Implementation Planning & Leading a BSP Team www.basicfba.com

Objectives By the end of this module you will be able to: 1. Describe the essential components of implementation plans 2. Explain the meaning and importance of Contextual Fit 3. Explain the role of BSP Team Leader and team members in support plan development 4. Identify the specific activities that the team leader will engage in before, during, and after the team-based BSP development process 5. Lead a team of professionals through the process of developing a sample BSP 63 Basic BSP Team Members

BSP Team Leader Administrator Staff members Math Teacher Identify staff who work with student in prioritized routine Other support/ implementing staff specific to plan Parent/Guardian

SPED Teacher? 64 What is Contextual Fit? Why is It Important? Contextual fit refers to the extent to which support strategies fit with: The skills and values of the implementers The available resources Administrative supports in place In other words How FEASIBLE are the strategies?

Strategies with good fit are more likely to be implemented with fidelity!! Finalizing the Implementation Plan IMPORTANT!!! Actively involve implementers in determining final interventions for Implementation Specifically identify if the interventions work for the implementers (Contextual Fit) If they DONT the intervention will NOT be implemented BSP Meeting Table Tent (p. 6.6)

67 Implementation Planning 1. Review each suggested interventions. Provide rationale & clearly define intervention 2. Ask the potential implementer: a) Do you think this would work? b) Does it fit your values? c) Is this feasible? d) Are you clear about how to do

this? Should we do this? What support would you need? What Who When 3. If not, do you have suggestions for revisions or alternative interventions? 68 Considering Contextual Fit

Revise interventions if there are staff concerns; but make sure it is function-based. Consequence Strategies Reinforce Desired Behavior When on task for 15 min, the student will be allowed to go to back table play a game with a student who has completed work for 5 min. Minimize Reward for Problem Behavior Student will stay after

school until math assignments are completed Staff Concern: Staff feel that this reward will be too disruptive to the rest of the class Staff Concern: Staff agree that this is

function-based but is not feasible Task Who When Reinforce Desired Behavior When student has been on task for 15 min, she will be allowed to sit quietly at her desk and read or draw for 5 min

Mrs. Rose 10/21 Minimize Reward for Problem Behavior Student will stay in from recess to complete work Mr. Poole 10/21

CONSIDER: Do the interventions match the function? & have good contextual fit? A Teachers Perspective. Contextual fit and ongoing coaching support are two important areas that need to be addressed when developing behavior support plans. More often than not, teachers in our district dont get much input in what goes into a plan. Usually the behavior consultant conducts an FBA, writes the BSP and the teacher is expected to interpret and execute it. There is minimal follow-up or coaching support. Implementation fidelity is low since there is no accountability and the process

isnt teacher friendly. I had no idea teachers could even object/disagree with recommendations on the BSP. Joyce Hum, Elementary Teacher Oakland Unified School District 70 Implementation Planning form (p. 6.5) Plan Training for

Implementers 71 Implementation Plan Implementation Supports 72 Performance Feedback Implementation Fidelity 73

Daily Point Card Front & Back Key Points Function-based strategies are most likely to be implemented if they also fit with the: Skills of the plan implementers Values of the plan implementers Resources available to the plan implementers The role of a BSP team leader is to guide team members in the selection of

preventive, teaching, and consequence strategies which: Directly relate to the FUNCTION of the problem behavior Are viewed by the team as CONTEXTUALLY APPROPRIATE Complete BSPs include: An IMPLEMENTATION PLAN specifying Who will do What by When and plan to Support Implementers with Implementation Task Over the next two weeks Conduct a BSP team meeting to finalize an Implementation Plan for the BSP Identify Specific Interventions, Who & When Ensure Contextual Fit

Develop an Implementation Support plan Training & Performance Feedback 76 Basic FBA to BSP Using FBA to Develop FunctionBased Support for Students with Mild to Moderate Problem Behavior Module 7: Evaluation & BSP Review www.basicfba.com Objectives

By the end of this module you will be able to: 1. Define the necessary components of evaluation plans and provide examples of appropriate short- and long-term goals 2. Develop a point card to measure progress toward shortterm goal and linked to incentive plan 3. Describe data collection procedures that would be used to track implementation fidelity and student progress when provided with a sample BSP 4. Describe the process for conducting a BSP Review Meeting and the products that should result from the meeting 78 Evaluation Planning Setting Goals

Student Outcomes & Implementation Fidelity Measurement Plan Data Collection methods must be Feasible & Accurate Regular Progress Monitoring & Decision Making BSP Evaluation Planning Form The team identifies: - Short-term goal - Long-term goal - Specific evaluation

procedures - Date to meet and evaluate the effectiveness of the plan EVALUATION PLAN Behavioral Goal (Use specific, observable, measurable descriptions of goal) What is the short-term behavioral goal? _________ Expected date What is the long-term behavioral goal? _________ Expected date Evaluation Procedures

Procedures for Data Collection Data to be Collected Person Responsible Timeline Is Plan Being Implemented? Is Plan Making a Difference?

Plan date for review meeting (suggested within 2 weeks) ________________ Use Competing Behavior Pathway to Guide Goal Development Goal Framework During , when (CONDITION), (STUDENT) will (BEHAVIOR) at least <%> of the time (CRITERION) as measured by (MEASURE) Expected Date Use Competing Behavior Pathway to Guide Goal Development

GOAL CONDITION & STUDENT READING, when .., During , asked to complete independent writing tasks JONAS will as measured by plan>. Student: JONAS Routine: READING No Setting Event identified

When asked to complete independent writing tasks Completes work independently Continue to next task Talk to peers and make loud

noises (e.g. animal sounds) Escape independent writing task Raise hand to request peer help Short-term goal Developing Goals

Short-term BSP Goal During Reading, when asked to complete independent writing tasks, (Condition) Jonas (Student) will work in his seat quietly OR appropriately request peer help (Behavior) at least 70% of the time (Criterion) as measured by ratings on a daily point card (Measure). Expected Date 11/20/15 83 Daily Point Card Template Measuring Student Outcomes JONAS Reading

6 10 minutes 9:00 #1 Quiet & in Seat #2 Appropriately Raises Hand to Request Peers Help #3 On Task 9:10

9:20 9:30 9:40 9:50 Daily Point Card Template Measuring Student Outcomes JONAS Reading 6

10 minutes 9:00 9:10 9:20 9:30 #1 Quiet and in Seat #2 Appropriately Raises Hand to Request Peers Help

#3 On Task Reasonable Behavioral Expectations? 9:40 9:50 Reasonable Timeframes How long should intervals be? Start with present level of performance to establish a Baseline

How long can the student go now? Use this info. to determine interval length Student can sit in seat for 8 minutes completing independent work How long should the interval be? 6 minute intervals Setting up the Daily Point Card BASELINE Estimate: Jonas can usually stay in his seat for 10 - 15 minutes at a time, but may need reminders to keep quiet during the 60 minutes of math time JONAS Reading

6 10 minutes 9:00 #1 Quiet and in Seat #2 Appropriately Raises Hand to Request Peers Help #3 On Task 9:10

9:20 9:30 9:40 9:50 Example Graph Simple Data Entry with an Excel template Key Points

An EVALUATION PLAN is for determining A) if the plan is being implemented B) if the plan is making a difference in student behavior C) when team members will meet again to discuss progress An Evaluation Plan includes a Short-term and Long-term Goal which can be developed using the Competing Behavior Pathway Team Implementers should Collect and Graph Fidelity and Effectiveness data daily using the Daily Point Card and Excel template The Behavior Support Plan is a Work in Progress!!! Team members meet every two weeks to Review the BSP Task Develop an Evaluation Plan including short-term

and long-term goals. Develop and implement a Daily Point Card for collecting student outcomes and implementation fidelity data. Graph your data daily. Hold a BSP Review Meeting after 2 weeks of implementation using data to guide planning and decision making. 91 A Teachers Perspective. These modules are excellent resources to build capacity (and buy-in) within schools. Instead of waiting weeks for a behavior consultant to observe a Tier 2/3 student, we

could use these modules to train a team of teachers/staff who could conduct them in a timely manner. Having a school based team (vs district consultants who may not have relationships with students and staff) also allows for more consistent coaching opportunities. Joyce Hum, Elementary Teacher Oakland Unified School District 92 Planning to Implement Basic FBA to BSP CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ~5% ~15% Universal Interventions: School-/ClassroomWide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

Intensive Individual Interventions: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behaviour Targeted Group Interventions: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviour SW-PBIS: District-level Organization Logic

Elements of SW-PBIS Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement SY ST E TA DA

Supporting Staff Behavior MS OUTCOMES PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Decision

Making District Planning, Coordination & Support Form a District Leadership team with range of stakeholders related to Tier 2 & 3 implementation & supports in the schools Build school capacity for implementing functionbased support through the provision of effective Training and ongoing Coaching & Evaluation to support development of Tier 3 Systems in Schools Oversee coordination and support for Tier 3 systems at the District level District Planning, Coordination & Support Re-evaluate role and responsibilities of Districtlevel Behavior Specialists

Commit to training: Basic FBA to BSP to build school-level capacity More advanced training for District Level Behavior Specialists Develop an annual training, coaching & evaluation calendar specific Tier 3, Tier 2 & Tier 1 PBIS implementation Basic FBA to BIP Course April 3-June 16 Portland State University Chris Borgmeier, PhD

Sheldon Loman, PhD

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