Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Principles of Electric Circuits

Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Principles of Electric Circuits

Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Passive Components Welcome to the Principles of Electric Circuits. You will study important ideas that are used in electronics. You may already be familiar with a few of the important parts used in electronic circuits. Resistors are introduced in Chapter 2. Color bands Resistors Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd

Resistance material (carbon composition) Insulation coating Leads Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Passive Components Capacitors will be introduced in Chapter 12. Capacitors Foil Mica Foil Mica

Foil Mica Foil Mica capacitor_ Tantalum electrolytic capacitor (polarized) Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Passive Components Inductors will be introduced in Chapter 13. Inductors

Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Passive Components Transformers will be introduced in Chapter 14. Transformers Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary

Active Components Passive components are used in conjunction with active components to form an electronic system. Active components will be the subject of future courses. Transistors Integrated Circuits Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary SI Fundamental Units Quantity

Unit length mass time electric current temperature luminous intensity amount of substance meter kilogram second ampere Kelvin candela mole Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd

Symbol m kg s A K cd mol Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Some Important Electrical Units Except for current, all electrical and magnetic units are derived from the fundamental units. Current is a fundamental unit. Quantity

Unit current charge voltage resistance power ampere coulomb volt ohm watt Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Symbol A C

V W Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Some Important Magnetic Units All magnetic units are derived from the fundamental units. Quantity flux density magnetic flux magnetizing force magnetomotive force permeability reluctance Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd

Unit Symbol tesla weber ampere-turns/meter ampere-turn webers/ampere-turns-meter ampere-turns/weber T Wb At/m At Wb/Atm At/Wb Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall

Chapter 1 Summary Scientific and Engineering Notation Very large and very small numbers are represented with scientific and engineering notation. 47,000,000 = 4.7 x 107 (Scientific Notation) = 47. x 106 (Engineering Notation) Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Scientific and Engineering Notation

0.000 027 = 2.7 x 10-5 (Scientific Notation) = 27 x 10-6 (Engineering Notation) 0.605 = 6.05 x 10-1 (Scientific Notation) = 605 x 10-3 (Engineering Notation) Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Engineering Metric Prefixes Can you name the prefixes and their meaning?

P peta 1015 T tera 1012 G giga 109 M

mega 106 k kilo 103 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Engineering Metric Prefixes

Can you name the prefixes and their meaning? m milli 10-3 micro 10-6 n

nano 10-9 p pico 10-12 f femto 10-15 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall

Chapter 1 Summary Metric Conversions When converting from a larger unit to a smaller unit, move the decimal point to the right. Remember, a smaller unit means the number must be larger. Smaller unit 0.47 M = 470 k Larger number Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Metric Conversions

When converting from a smaller unit to a larger unit, move the decimal point to the left. Remember, a larger unit means the number must be smaller. Larger unit 10,000 pF = 0.01 F Smaller number Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Metric Arithmetic When adding or subtracting numbers with a metric prefix, convert them to the same prefix first. 10,000 + 22 k = 10,000 + 22,000 = 32,000 Alternatively,

10 k + 22 k = 32 k Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Summary Metric Arithmetic When adding or subtracting numbers with a metric prefix, convert them to the same prefix first. 200 + 1.0 mA = 200 A + 1,000 A = 12,000 A Alternatively, 0.200 m + 1.0 mA = 1.2 mA Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd

Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Selected Key Terms Engineering A system for representing any number as a one-, notation two-, or three-digit number times a power of ten with an exponent that is a multiple of three. Exponent The number to which a base is raised. Metric prefix A symbol that is used to replace the power of ten in numbers expressed in scientific or engineering notation. Scientific A system for representing any number as a notation number between 1 and 10 times a power of ten. Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall

Chapter 1 Quiz 1. A resistor is an example of a. a passive component b. an active component c. an electrical circuit d. all of the above Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 2. The electrical unit that is fundamental is the a. volt

b. ohm c. coulomb d. ampere Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 3. In scientific notation, the number 0.000 56 is written a. 5.6 x 104 b. 5.6 x 10-4 c. 56 x 10-5 d. 560 x 10-6 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd

Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 4. In engineering notation, the number 0.000 56 is written a. 5.6 x 104 b. 5.6 x 10-4 c. 56 x 10-5 d. 560 x 10-6 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz

5. The metric prefix nano means a. 10-3 b. 10-6 c. 10-9 d. 10-12 Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 6. The metric prefix pico means a. 10-3 b. 10-6 c. 10-9 d. 10-12

Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 7. The number 2700 MW can be written a. 2.7 TW b. 2.7 GW c. 2.7 kW d. 2.7 mW Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1

Quiz 8. The value 68 k is equal to a. 6.8 x 104 b. 68, 000 c. 0.068 M d. All of the above Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 9. The sum of 330 mW + 1.5 W is a. 331.5 mW b. 3.35 W c. 1.533 W

d. 1.83 W Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall Chapter 1 Quiz 10. The quantity 200 V is the same as a. 0.000 200 V b. 20 mV c. 0.2 V d. all of the above Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall

Chapter 1 Quiz Answers: Principles of Electric Circuits - Floyd 1. a 6. d 2. d 7. b 3. b 8. d 4. d

9. d 5. c 10. a Copyright 2006 Prentice-Hall

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