Nevada Department of Education ESSA Plan Update ESSA

Nevada Department of Education ESSA Plan Update ESSA

Nevada Department of Education ESSA Plan Update ESSA Advisory Group Meeting February 26, 2019 Objective for Todays ESSA Advisory Group Meeting To engage the ESSA Advisory Group in technical updates to the ESSA Plan. To share progress toward achievement indicators and other goals included in the ESSA Plan. To share the various programmatic supports that are available to School Districts and Schools. Vision & Mission Vision All Nevadans ready for success in the 21st Century. Mission Our mission is to improve student achievement and educator effectiveness by ensuring opportunities, facilitating learning, and promoting excellence. 3 State Board & Department Goal Become the Fastest Improving State in the Nation (FISN) by 2020. 4 Fastest Improving Goals & Progress Graduation Rate ACT Composite Score CwD in Inclusion Early Childhood Education NAEP English Language Proficiency Smarter Balanced

Quality Rated Early Childhood Programs CTE Completers 5 State Board of Education & Department Goals 6 State Improvement Plan (STIP) Alignment to ESSA Goal 1: All students are proficient in reading by the end of 3rd grade. Goal 2: All students enter high school with skills necessary to succeed. Goal 3: All students graduate college, career, and community ready. Goal 4: All students served by effective educators. Goal 5: Efficient and effective use of public funds in service to students. Goal 6: All students learn in an environment that is physically, emotionally, and intellectually safe. Strong Start (Pre-k) High Quality Standards (Goals 2

& 3) College and Career Ready Educator Readiness Internal Systems & Effectiveness Students and adults develop SEAD competencies Annual Administration of Assessment (Goals 1 3) Data-informed continuous improvement (Goals 1 3) 3 Stars in 3 Years (Goals 1 3) Family Engagement Funding & Reporting MTSS & Department Climate 7 Long Term Goals

Measure of Interim Progress Long-term goals coincide with the goal of becoming the fastest improving state in the nation Goal established by subgroup such that lower performing subgroups require greater year to year gains Graduation goals based on 2022 all students goal of 89.4% This associated improvement trend was applied to all subgroups Academic achievement goals set a 5% reduction in nonproficiency from 2016 to 2022 Common goals for all subgroups to be established in 2022 for 2030 Additional historic trend data follows Nevada Goals Compared to Other States ELA Nevada 2016 Deleware Baseline 2016 Baseline Nevada 2017 Goals Connecticut 2017 Goals South Dakota 2017 Baseline Utah 2017 Goals Montana 2017 Baseline All Hispanic Asian 49.90% 39.60% 71.40%

52.09% 40.69% 76.92% 52.40% 42.60% 72.80% 63.80% 58.80% 73.50% 52.70% 37.69% 49.44% 48.70% 28.90% 55.50% 50.30% NA NA AfricanAmerican 33.00% 36.19% 36.40% 56.60% 32.15% 27.90% NA Native American

32.90% 56.90% 36.30% 63.90% 21.91% 24.20% 21.40% Pacific Islander 50.90% 50.00% 53.30% 68.10% 56.06% 31.30% NA Caucasian Multi-race Children with Disabilities 62.00% 58.50% 64.43% 55.34% 63.90%

60.60% 66.40% 64.20% 59.32% 46.50% 53.80% 51.10% 55.30% NA 18.30% 13.48% 22.40% 54.90% 18.82% 17.20% 18.30% 37.90% 35.60% 41.00% 58.20% 35.68% 34.00% 37.70%

31.70% 15.14% 35.10% 58.60% 16.55% 16.40% 6.50% Elementary 3rd - 8th Elementary 3rd - 8th 3rd - 8th & 11th 3rd - 10th 3rd - 8th Economically Disadvantaged EL (Current + Former) Target Grades Nevada Goals Compared to Other States - Math Nevada 2016 Deleware Baseline 2016 Baseline Nevada 2017

Goals Connecticut 2017 Goals South Dakota 2017 Baseline Utah 2017 Goals Montana 2017 Baseline All Hispanic Asian 39.90% 29.60% 63.60% 40.49% 29.73% 73.40% 42.20% 32.60% 66.20% 65.00% 58.20% 79.40% 46.34% 29.60% 45.19% 51.10% 28.90% 59.10%

41.30% NA NA AfricanAmerican 21.10% 23.39% 23.90% 55.30% 24.13% 26.90% NA Native American 23.40% 40.74% 21.60% 63.60% 15.61% 24.50% 15.30% Pacific Islander 39.70% 42.86%

43.90% 72.20% 42.42% 31.90% NA Caucasian Multi-race 52.50% 47.80% 52.87% 42.55% 55.10% 49.40% 68.40% 65.30% 53.12% 39.63% 56.80% 51.30% 46.00% NA Children with Disabilities 16.70% 10.36% 15.90%

54.40% 18.47% 21.50% 14.70% Economically Disadvantaged 28.80% 25.42% 32.30% 57.20% 29.88% 36.10% 29.30% EL (Current + Former) Target Grades 25.10% 18.10% 18.40% 59.50% 16.93% 19.80%

6.90% Elementary 3rd - 8th Elementary 3rd - 8th 3rd - 8th & 11th 3rd - 10th 3rd - 8th Elementary School - ELA 2016 Baseline 2017 Goals 2017 Rates 2018 Goals 2018 Rates 2022 All 49.9% 52.4% 48.7% 54.7% 50.1%

63.1% Hispanic 39.6% 42.6% 39.1% 45.5% 41.2% 55.6% Asian 71.4% 72.8% 70.2% 74.1% 71.7% 78.9% African-American 33.0% 36.4% 32.2% 39.6% 33.2%

50.8% Native American 32.9% 36.3% 27.3% 39.5% 31.0% 50.7% Pacific Islander 50.9% 53.3% 50.7% 55.7% 51.7% 63.9% Caucasian 62.0% 63.9% 61.0% 65.7% 62.2%

72.1% Multi-race 58.5% 60.6% 58.1% 62.6% 58.4% 69.5% Children with Disabilities 18.3% 22.4% 16.2% 26.3% 16.9% 39.9% Economically Disadvantaged 37.9% 41.0% 38.7% 44.0% 40.9%

54.4% EL (Current + Former) 31.7% 35.1% 17.2% 38.4% 21.2% 49.8% Elementary School Math 2016 Baseline 2017 Goals 2017 Rates 2018 Goals 2018 Rates 2022 All 39.9% 42.9% 42.2% 45.8% 43.4%

55.8% Hispanic 29.6% 33.1% 32.6% 36.5% 34.1% 48.2% Asian 63.6% 65.4% 66.2% 67.2% 68.7% 73.3% African-American 21.1% 25.0% 23.9% 28.8% 24.8%

42.0% Native American 23.4% 27.2% 21.6% 30.9% 24.4% 43.7% Pacific Islander 39.7% 42.7% 43.9% 45.6% 44.5% 55.7% Caucasian 52.5% 54.9% 55.1% 57.2% 56.1%

65.1% Multi-race 47.8% 50.4% 49.4% 52.9% 50.1% 61.6% Children with Disabilities 16.7% 20.9% 15.9% 24.8% 16.2% 38.8% Economically Disadvantaged 28.8% 32.4% 32.3% 35.7%

34.0% 47.7% EL (Current + Former) 25.1% 28.8% 18.4% 32.4% 20.7% 44.9% Middle School - ELA All Hispanic Asian African-American Native American Pacific Islander Caucasian Multi-race Children with Disabilities Economically Disadvantaged EL (Current + Former) 2016 Baseline 46.4% 36.0% 71.9% 27.5% 34.0% 45.4%

60.7% 54.8% 2017 Goals 49.1% 39.2% 73.3% 31.1% 37.3% 48.1% 62.7% 57.1% 2017 Rates 47.0% 37.2% 71.8% 28.8% 34.2% 45.5% 59.6% 55.3% 2018 Goals 51.7% 42.2% 74.6% 34.5% 40.5% 50.7% 64.6% 59.2% 2018 Rates 47.9% 37.9% 73.1% 30.5%

34.1% 48.8% 60.7% 56.7% 9.0% 13.5% 8.0% 17.8% 9.0% 33.1% 35.1% 38.3% 35.6% 41.4% 36.3% 52.3% 11.7% 16.1% 21.4% 20.3% 13.2% 35.1% 2022

60.6% 53.0% 79.3% 46.7% 51.5% 59.9% 71.1% 66.8% Middle School - Math 2016 Baseline 2017 Goals 2017 Rates 2018 Goals 2018 Rates 2022 All Hispanic Asian African-American Native American 26.0% 17.5% 51.7% 10.8% 29.7% 21.6% 54.1% 15.2% 26.9% 18.2% 52.4% 11.5% 33.2% 25.5% 56.4% 19.5%

32.4% 22.6% 59.9% 14.8% 45.6% 39.4% 64.5% 34.4% 16.4% 20.6% 17.5% 24.6% 19.8% 38.6% Pacific Islander Caucasian Multi-race Children with Disabilities 26.4% 38.3% 30.8% 30.1% 41.4% 34.2% 26.6% 38.8% 33.1% 33.6%

44.4% 37.5% 31.7% 45.2% 39.4% 45.9% 54.7% 49.1% 5.1% 9.8% 4.7% 14.3% 5.0% 30.2% Economically Disadvantaged 17.4% 21.5% 17.5% 25.5% 21.5% 39.3% EL (Current + Former) 6.9%

11.6% 4.4% 16.0% 4.5% 31.6% High School - ELA 2017 Baseline 61.34% 2018 Goal 63.27% 2018 Rates 67.2% 2019 Goal 65.11% 2022 Goal 70.08% African American Caucasian Hispanic 23.98% 58.17% 29.64% 27.78% 60.26% 33.15% 28.2% 59.5%

33.0% 31.39% 62.25% 36.50% 41.18% 67.63% 45.55% Native American Multi-race 29.92% 53.54% 33.43% 55.86% 31.5% 55.0% 36.76% 58.07% 45.78% 64.05% Pacific Islander IEP 43.21% 6.60% 46.05% 11.27% 43.5% 7.7% 48.75%

15.71% 56.06% 27.73% Current + Frm EL FRL All Students 8.61% 30.92% 42.98% 13.18% 34.37% 45.83% 29.6% 33.2% 45.6% 17.52% 37.66% 48.54% 29.28% 46.55% 55.88% Asian High School - Math 2017 Baseline 2018 Goal 2018 Rates 2019 Goal 2022 Goal

Asian 44.90% 47.65% 48.4% 50.27% 57.36% African American 9.60% 14.12% 10.0% 18.42% 30.05% Caucasian 38.23% 41.31% 38.5% 44.25% 52.20% Hispanic 14.60%

18.87% 15.3% 22.93% 33.92% Native American 14.81% 19.07% 16.0% 23.12% 34.09% Multi-race 30.15% 33.64% 33.7% 36.96% 45.95% Pacific Islander 21.62% 25.54% 22.4% 29.26%

39.35% IEP 2.92% 7.77% 2.6% 12.38% 24.88% Current + Frm EL 5.29% 10.02% 14.7% 14.52% 26.71% FRL 15.79% 20.01% 16.3% 24.00% 34.84% All Students

25.57% 29.29% 26.4% 32.83% 42.41% 4-Year Graduation Rate Progress Class of 2017 Baseline Class of 2018 Goals Class of 2018 Rates Asian 93.1 93.3 94.05 93.5 94.1 Caucasian 84.2 85.5 85.98

86.8 90.7 Pacific Islander English Learners 82.3 81.7 83.9 83.4 84.30 76.04 85.5 85.1 90.3 90.2 Multi-race 81.3 83.0 83.21 84.7 89.8 All Students 80.9 82.6 83.17

84.3 89.4 Hispanic 79.7 81.5 82.29 83.3 88.7 Economic Disadvantage 76.8 78.7 80.49 80.6 86.3 Native American 73.9 75.9 79.80 77.9 83.9 Black

67.7 69.8 71.53 71.9 78.2 Students with Disabilities 64.7 66.9 65.96 69.1 75.7 4-year Class of Class 2019 of 2022 5-Year Graduation Rate Progress *Note Extended year graduation rates are determined two years after the original year of graduation. The validation for this rate is in process. Class of 2016 Rates

Class of 2017 goal Asian 89.76 Caucasian Class of 2017 Rates* Class of 2018 Class of 2022 95.1 95.3 96.1 82.21 86.2 87.5 92.7 Pacific Islander 78.74 84.3 85.9

92.3 English Learners 71.74 83.7 85.4 92.2 Multi-race 79.16 83.3 85.0 91.8 All 76.93 82.9 84.6 91.4 Hispanic Economic Disadvantage 74.00 81.7 83.5

90.7 70.93 78.8 80.7 88.3 Native American 70.21 75.9 77.9 85.9 Black Students with Disabilities 61.65 69.7 71.8 80.2 35.41 66.7 68.9 77.7 Enrollment by Ethnicity

Historical Trends in Special Population Membership in Nevada Special Population Enrollment 2018 Smarter Consortium States Proficiency Rates ELA 2018 Smarter Balanced Consortium States Proficiency Rates Mathematics Historical Trends in National Assessment for Education Progress for Nevada NAEP Tables HistoricalCohort TrendsGraduation in Nevada 4-year Statewide Rates by Graduation Rates Ethnicity Goal: All students proficient in reading by the end of 3rd grade. Strategies: 1. Improve the quality of all early childhood (birth-3rd grade) programs 2. Increase access to high quality early childhood programs 3. Establish an aligned system of screening and assessment across early childhood programs 4. Improve effective literacy instruction for both emergent skills and the domains of literacy OFFICE OF EARLY LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT (OELD)

Created by Executive Order in 2013 The focus of the OELD is to coordinate birth-3rd grade state level work in collaboration with the Nevada Early Childhood Advisory Council and to improve access and quality of early childhood programs across a variety of settings. Administers multiple early childhood funding sources Child Care and Development Fund Quality Dollars Head Start State Collaboration State Pre-K Preschool Development Grant OELD: Measuring Success Brigance Early Childhood Screen III administered in child care and pre-k programs Brigance Early Childhood Screen III scores administered at kindergarten entry Measures of Academic Progress (MAPS) reading assessment kindergarten through 3rd grade QRIS star ratings of child care and pre-k programs Pre-k inclusion rate OELD: Building a B-3 System 2019 Nevada received a one-year Federal Preschool Development Grant Birth through Five (PDG B-5) Planning grant only (no funding for seats) Needs Assessment Strategic Plan Maximizing Parental Choice and Knowledge Sharing Best Practices Improving Overall Quality Nevada Ready! State Pre-K First funded during the 2001 Legislative session Flat-funded at $3.3 million Initially served 694 three and four-year-olds in a half-day program 2015 Nevada received a Federal Preschool

Development Grant (PDG) Currently serving 3,023 four-year-olds whose families are under 200% FPL in a full-day program Nevada Ready! State Pre-K 2 2019 Legislative Session requesting $26 million per year to maintain the 3,023 highquality seats Continue to follow the requirements of the PDG grant through a competitive grant process Nevada Ready! State Pre-k Quality Matters Components of Quality: Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood Nevada Scholarships Professional Development Comprehensive Wraparound Services Slide 31 Nevada Academic Content Standards-Based Standards Instruction for Every Student Every Day Slide 32 standards /standard stan-drd/ concise, written descriptions of what students are expected to know and be able to do at a specific stage of their education (The Glossary of Education Reform, 2018) Computer Science English Language Arts Mathematics

Science Fine Arts Social Studies Health and Physical Education World Languages Nevada Academic Content Standards Create a seamless education system through intentional alignment of K-12 expectations Infuses 21st century skills into rigorous content Prepare every student for meaningful postsecondary education, workforce, and civic opportunities Local school boards and charter schools are responsible for implementation OSIS Priorities Core Standards Cycle of Continual Refinement Educational Technology NR21 Distance Education STEM Initiatives and Support Summer Learning Instructional Materials Adoption Nevada Ready Network Smarter Balanced Digital Library Competency-Based Learning Pilots Regardless of the content, course, grade

level, school, district, or charter, every Nevada student is afforded the opportunity to learn at high levels Slide 35 The Office of Special Education The Purpose of Special Education: to ensure that all students with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living (Sec. 330.1a ) Early Childhood Special Education / 619 Supporting young students with disabilities and their families so all Early Childhood students have equitable access to high quality inclusive preschool education Fast Facts Expanded Inclusive Opportunities 8,984 3-5 year old students with IEPs served in grades PK & K Inclusion rates increased by almost 4% in 3 years

Improved Early Childhood Outcomes *Based on Oct. 2017 Count Day Data Early Childhood Reverse Inclusion (ERIC) programs Braiding funds to blend programs Removal of barriers 4 - EC Inclusion Summits Inclusion Guidance Manual EC Outcomes Guidance Manual Cross-office collaborative meetings & trainings Technical Assistance & PD provided to all Districts APR Tools created and disseminated Assess Plan Teach (APT) Nevadas Part B State-Identified Measurable Result (SIMR) as well as the State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) focuses on improving the literacy achievement of third-grade students with disabilities. APT is a five-year joint effort between NDE and CCSD and is designed to build the school districts capacity to strengthen special education teachers skills in assessment, instruction. The APT Project targets 31 schools in Clark County School District (CCSD) and is guided by and APT leadership team comprised of state and district leaders.

The APT model incorporates a structured, databased consultation model and training on research-based, explicit, systematic instruction and lesson plan development. Increasing Opportunity for Nevadas Students with Disabilities Graduation Year 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 % of Graduating Students with Disabilities 29.3% 64.7% 66.0% Postsecondary Transition Initiatives: Multi-Agency Collaboration Facilitated by the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) Participating agencies include: NTACT, NDEs Office of Special Education, NDEs Career and Technical Education (CTE) Office, VR, Aging and Disability Services, Clark County School District, and Lyon County School District Working to advance student participation in CTE courses and access to PreEmployment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Work and successes at the school district level is being scaled out across Nevada, including Pre-ETS documentation within IEP systems Alternative Diploma now available to Nevadas students with significant cognitive disabilities Implementation technical assistance guidance issued to districts Credit and content standard technical assistance guidance issued to districts Collaboration with UNR and UNLV toward teacher and curriculum development Professional development planning in progress Newly formed Nevada Transition Leadership Teams Participants from NDE, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Aging and Disability

Slide Services, Rural and Urban School Districts, and Nevada PEP Working with Jonathan Martinis, Senior Director for Law and Policy, Burton Blatt 40 Institute, Syracuse, NY Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) Development and planning for the 13th annual NSLTS Focus on student led IEPs and school-wide leadership roles 28 teams from throughout Nevada attended the 12th annual NSLTS envisionIT Curriculum Statewide Scale-Out NDE Collaboration with the Ohio State University to implement the envisionIT 21st Century transition curriculum in Nevada high schools CTE VISION All Nevadans ready for success in the 21st Century. MISSION The Office of Career Readiness, Adult Learning and Education Options is dedicated to developing innovative educational opportunities for students to acquire skills for productive employment and lifelong learning. STATE EDUCATIONAL GOALS: 2020 Goal 3: All students graduate college and career ready Objective 6: College and career readiness STRATEGIC PRIORITIES Implement standards, programs, and assessments that prepare all students for college and careers. CTE The Career Pathway Foundation 76 Programs of Study - NAC 389.803 97 public high schools - 16 school districts By 2025, 60% of Nevadans aged 25-34 will have attained some form of postsecondary degree, certificate or credential. Brian Sandoval, Governor CTE Funding SFY15-16 7/1/15-6/30/16

SFY16-17 7/1/16-6/30/17 SFY17-18 7/1/17-6/30/18 SFY18-19 7/1/18-6/30/19 (increased from $3,543,822 in SFY14-15) $12,543,822 $12,543,822 $12,543,822 PY15 7/1/15-9/30/16 PY16 7/1/16-9/30/17 PY17 7/1/17-9/30/18 PY18 7/1/18-9/30/19 Federal Carl D. Perkins CTE $9,741,942 $9,827,913 $9,848,585 $10,648,135

TOTALS $20,185,764 $22,371,735 $22,392,407 $23,191,957 State General Fund $10,443,822 NSFY Career Pathways Funding Private NSFY/LifeWorks SFY15-16 7/1/15-6/30/16 SFY16-17 7/1/16-6/30/17 SFY17-18 7/1/17-6/30/18 SFY18-19 7/1/18-6/30/19 n/a $100,000 $977,251 $650,000 CTE Outcomes CTE Enrollment 68,000

67,000 66,000 65,000 64,000 63,000 62,000 61,000 60,000 59,000 CTE Concentrators 25,000 66,724 20,000 63,787 63,294 15,000 61,900 20,723 15,810 16,428 2015-16 2016-17 17,761 10,000 5,000 0 Graduation Rates CTE Completers 12,000

11,425 10,000 8,000 6,000 7,587 8,422 2017-18 2018-19 Validated Nevada Total CTE Students 91.23% 85.44% 83.76% 80.85% 73.55% 70.77% 93.30% 83.17% 9,329 4,000 2,000 0 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Validated 44 CTE Equity Outcomes and Work CTE Pathways Mapping

CTE program enrollment and location data to workforce and economic data Aligned and non-aligned CTE programs and career pathways Identify CTE deserts; equity, access and opportunities Perkins V: high-skill, high-wage, in-demand occupations and industries Development, revision/improvement/enhancement, and phase-out NEW SKILLS FOR YOUTH - LIFEWORKS To increase the number of students completing relevant and effective career pathways in high-demand, high-skill areas. To establish durable policies, processes, and programs that align agencies, organizations, and actors across the state to achieve greater results for far more students. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Employer engagement Quality and rigor in career pathways for ALL students Career-focused accountability system Scaled pathways that culminate in credentials of value Integrated funding streams and joint resource planning Cross-institutional alignment NEW NEVADA HIGH-PRIORITY CAREER PATHWAYS 1. 2. 3. 4. Advanced Manufacturing Health Care Education Technology

METHODS OWINN, GOED, DETR, NDE, NSHE, labor market information, Nevadas economic data GOAL CTE program alignment to high-skill, high-wage, in-demand career pathways. HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS OF VALUE COLLEGE AND CAREER READY HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA A.B. 7 (2017); R076-17 Advanced Diploma + College-Ready Endorsement Career-Ready Endorsement STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA REVISED A.B. 7 (2017); R120-17 Graduating class of 2022 Overall increase from 22 to 23 units of credit 15 to 17 units of credit for required courses 7 to 6 units of credit for elective courses Two required units of College and Career Ready Flex credits Fourth year of mathematics; or Third year of science; or Second year of CTE (concentrator); or Third year of CTE (completer); or Third year of social studies

CTE SKILLS ATTAINMENT CERTIFICATE 3.0 GPA CTE POS courses Passed the CTE Employability Skills Assessment Passed the CTE End-of-Program Assessment NAC 389.800 NEW Summary of Accountability Updates (1) Updated high school long-term goals and measures of interim progress Reflects change from EOC to ACT Reset 4- and 5-year graduation rate baseline Updated information regarding 8th grade mathematics assessment Summary of Accountability Updates (2) Nevada School Performance Framework updates Remove EOC from MS Exchange EOC with ACT in HS Updated graduate rate indicator language per AB 64 Change 4-year and 5-year graduation rate weights From 20% to 25% and 10% to 5% respectively Update and change school quality indicators and weights Mostly high school due to change in assessment Remove climate survey bonus points Update subgroup language Summary of Accountability Updates (3) Clarifying language regarding year in school (YIS), aka partial attendance Update to school rating conditions Update to indicator weights table Update to star rating cut scores Included high school Update to TSI school designation language clean up and methodological change

From AA or two indicators to AA and two indicators Summary of Accountability Updates (4) Participation penalty language clean up Clarify language regarding rating all schools ATSI school designation methodology update, language clean up and methodological change ATSI as a subset of TSI linked to CSI schools Point attribution table updates Evidence-based Interventions for Continuous Improvement Fund what works Guide and provide support so districts and schools identify and select evidence-based interventions that meet local needs and match their context. Prioritize funding of evidence-based interventions for competitive federal and state grant programs to ensure effective usage of funding. Use data and research to drive decision-making. Lead for equity Ensure that all students have access to rigorous learning environments filled with evidence-based strategies, activities, and interventions. Provide academic and social emotional evidence-based supports. Strengthen the local evidence base Fund rigorous external and internal evaluations to determine whether local implementation of evidencebased interventions positively impact student outcomes. Build research practice partnerships to help Nevada find solutions for problems of practice in education. Strengthen local capacity and culture of innovation Validate and spread promising evidence-based practices across the state. Build capacity of local community based organizations that implement evidence-based interventions and/or partner with the educational system. Aligned with the Nevada ESSA Plan and State Strategic Plan ESSA Levels of Evidence A requirement in ESSA sec. 8101 (21)(A) and Nevada Statute AB7 (2017) Demonstration Level Levels of Evidence

Evidence-based Citation An activity, strategy, or intervention that demonstrates a statistically significant effect on improving student outcomes or other relevant outcomes An activity, strategy, or intervention that demonstrates a statistically significant effect on improving student outcomes or other relevant outcomes An activity, strategy, or intervention that demonstrates a statistically significant effect on improving student outcomes or other relevant outcomes LEVEL 1: STRONG EVIDENCE Evidence cited is based on: at least 1 well-designed and wellimplemented experimental study LEVEL 2: MODERATE EVIDENCE An activity, strategy, or intervention that demonstrates a rationale that such activity, strategy, or intervention is likely to improve student outcomes or other relevant outcomes LEVEL 4: DEMONSTRATES A RATIONALE Evidence cited is based on: at least 1 well-designed and wellimplemented quasi-experimental study Evidence cited is based on: at least 1 well-designed and wellimplemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias

Evidence cited is based on: highquality research findings or positive evaluation, and includes ongoing efforts to examine the effects of such activity, strategy, or intervention LEVEL 3: PROMISING EVIDENCE Nevada Federal Funding Sources Federal Program* Amount per year Supports Title I, Part A Title I, 1003(a) School Improvement Title II ~$119 million Schools with high percentages of children from low-income families ~$8.5 million Lowest performing federally designated schools in the state: Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) schools and Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) schools ~$12 million Recruiting, preparing, training, and developing teachers and school leaders Title III Title IV A

~$6.4 million English learner students to attain language proficiency ~$9 million Students with a well-rounded education, safe and healthy schools, and effective use of technology Title IV B ~$9 million Establishment and expansion of before school, after school, and extended learning opportunities Gear Up** IDEA ~$6 million Low-income students to enter and succeed in higher education ~$79.5 million Students with disabilities *Please note that this is not a comprehensive list of funding sources. ** The state won this limited term grant and is in the process of reapplying for the grant. Nevada State Funding Sources State Program* Amount per year Supports College and $3.6 million Career Readiness

Competitive STEM programs, increased participation in AP courses, increased and expanded dual enrollment programs, and implementation of work-based learning programs Read by Grade 3 $22 million Students to read proficiently by the end of third grade SB 178 $36 million Student achievement of low-income students and English learners who score in the bottom quartile of performance Victory $25 million Academic and social emotional services to underperforming schools in the highest poverty zip codes Zoom $50 million Targeted services in the lowest performing elementary schools with the highest percentage of English learners *Please note that this does not include DSA funds and is not a comprehensive list of funding sources. Other Supports Provided to Schools Technical assistance and training Support with Federal and state program implementation Guidance documents Social emotional supports and services Early learning supports Tools for Schools (cross office collaborative within NDE focused on the lowest performing schools)

School improvement tools and supports Redesign of school performance plans, district performance plans, comprehensive needs assessments, and consolidated monitoring tools A comprehensive and streamlined school improvement process that aligns data with strategic planning and budgeting , including the grants management system Fiscal alignment between schools, districts, and the state, specifically for Title I schools Supports for Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) schools and Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) schools Review of School Performance Plans for CSI schools Targeted training and professional development opportunities Evaluating CSI and TSI schools that make rapid and significant gains to determine effective strategies for school improvement Meetings and conferences Annual Directors Meeting for Title I, Title II, and Title III School Leadership Network NDE MEGA Conference Evidence, data, research, evaluation State pre-vetted evidence list NDE Data Road Show NDE Evidence and Equity Convening focused on evidence-based interventions Research practice partnerships Supporting Excellent Educators Amendments are made to provide clarification regarding legislative changes and updated alignment of activities. Emphasis on skills in the areas of Cultural Competency and Social, Emotional, and Academic Development impact teaching and learning by enriching the school climate. Changes in the review and approval system of Educator Preparation Programs are working to increase consistency and better alignment with licensure requirements, the Nevada Educator Performance Framework (NEPF), and Nevada Academic Content Standards (NVACS). Support for Educators Nevadas three levers: prioritization of funds to support school leaders the transformation/turnaround of lowest performing schools and data-informed instructional decision making. Ongoing work to deepen educator understanding of the WIDA English Language Development Standards with content standards and instruction

underscore educator best practices for English learners and other diverse student populations. Nevada is working to promote teacher leadership as a critical element in educator recruitment, retention, and development. The work of the Nevada Equitable Services Ombudsman is reflective of Nevadas commitment to effective educators for all students, including nonprofit Private schools. Educator Equity The table in Appendix B is being prepared with the most current data available (2017-2018), including preliminary data for experience. This revision includes data that is more accurate and valid as compared to previous versions. Strategies have been revised to reflect legislative and/or regulatory updates. The Timeline and Interim Targets toward eliminating differences in rates describe current work to revise Nevadas Equity Plan, specifically in establishing clear expectations for annual data reporting, and an increased focus on the consistency of metrics, data collection, data reporting, and monitoring. Nevada seeks to engage stakeholders in formalizing continuous improvement procedures by capitalizing on opportunities for input from existing groups. Questions?

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    The sources of the others you should know before taking BCH 3033. Glycogen Phosphorylase. This is the reaction incytoplasms, not digestive tracts. This is the enzyme that is modified by phosphorylation (phosphorylase-a and -b forms.
  • Student Discipline, Bullying & Cyber-Bullying

    Student Discipline, Bullying & Cyber-Bullying

    Mandatory Consequence. Acts of bullying shall be punished by a range of consequences through the progressive discipline process. Such consequences shall include, at a minimum, counseling and disciplinary action as appropriate under the circumstances. However, Georgia law mandates that upon...
  • Unit 1 Grade 9 - Room 103

    Unit 1 Grade 9 - Room 103

    Commonplace or dull . Synonym: unimaginative . Prosaic . Julie was shocked when Allen told her that his book was going to be published; she had found his work to be prosaic and boring. Sacrosanct . Adjective. Extremely sacred ....
  • DARPA BioComp PI Meeting, 2001 The Eukaryotic Cell

    DARPA BioComp PI Meeting, 2001 The Eukaryotic Cell

    Virginia Tech Other titles: Times New Roman Comic Sans MS Arial StarBats Symbol Default Design Microsoft Word Document PowerPoint Presentation PowerPoint Presentation Three Objectives DoD Relevance The cell cycle is central to all processes of biological growth, development and reproduction.
  • How to Conduct a Successful Meeting LATA Student

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  • SYNTAX AND PARALLEL STRUCTURE Mini Lesson Syntax? Parallel

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    Define parallel: very similar and often happening at the same time ... They're very easy to spot, since every gerund is a verb with ing tacked to its tail. To find gerunds in sentences, just look for a verb +ing...