Building Early Links for Learning: Promoting quality early

Building Early Links for Learning: Promoting quality early

Building Early Links for Learning: Promoting quality early education for children in family shelter. J. J. Cutuli Rutgers University, Camden Chuck Kieffer The Cloudburst Group Amanda Atkinson Will Curran-Groome Public Health Management Corporation BELL Goal/Purpose Early Childhood Education (ECE) participation among children in shelter

Collaboration between emergency housing & early childhood education providers Developmental friendliness of housing programs Overview Introduction and context (5 minutes) Key Learnings from Parents and Providers (20 minutes) Chuck Kieffer, The Cloudburst Group Models to improve early learning services (20 minutes) Amanda Atkinson, Public Health Management Corporation Facilitated discussion Focus on Family Shelters: Emergency Shelter/Transitional Housing (ES/TH) 18 City-contracted providers Spread out across the city, to some degree

Focus on Family Shelters: Emergency Shelter/Transitional Housing (ES/TH) 18 City-contracted providers Spread out across the city, to some degree Most children in ES/TH are under 6 (53%) Children in ES/TH by age (N =3,612) 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 to 12 13 to 17 ECE Survey of Parents in ES/TH, 2016 (3-to-5 year olds)

49.81% 50.19% Attending Not Attending Survey of ES/TH providers, 2016: ECE Use among Birth-to-Five Year Olds Two questions: 1) What are key issues to consider? 2) What are strategies and models that might work in Philadelphia? Key Learnings from Parents and Providers:

Increasing Access to Quality Early Childhood Education Chuck Kieffer The Cloudburst Group NAEHCY Annual Conference October 29, 2017 Focus Group Objectives & Process Objectives Conduct exploratory focus groups, with: Parents of young children in Philadelphia ES/TH Philadelphia ECE/CC and ES/TH providers Identify and apply lessons from focus groups to enhance cross-systems policies,

practices, & training Recruitment/facilitation of 7 focus groups Process Semi-structured, open-ended, small group dialogues Intensive analysis of verbatim transcripts and process notes to identify key/recurring themes Descriptors of Group Participants 33 parents/guardians in 4 focus groups

Traits similar to homeless family population in general 88% 82% 67% 97% female African American 20-29 years old single/never married

19 staff members from Early Childhood Education and Homeless Shelter/Services programs in 3 focus groups Key Findings: PARENTAL Reflections and Dialogue Parental Perspectives on Quality Care Special Challenges Facing Parents Experiencing Homelessness

Challenges Facing Parents in Dealing with ECE System Issues in Identifying and Accessing Appropriate ECE Opportunities Parental Perspectives on Role of Housing Crisis Service Providers and ECE Key Findings:

PROVIDER Reflections and Dialogue Divergent Provider Perspectives on Access to Care Recognition of Special Challenges Facing Homeless Parents Special Challenges for ECE System Response Role of Housing and ECE Providers in Enhancing Family Supports

Practice Recommendations: Early Childhood Education Providers Expand community outreach and shelter in-reach Address systemic barriers to parental participation, re:

Better inform homeless parents of ECE resources Address programmatic challenges with enrollment/participation Enrollment requirements and procedures Flexibility of scheduling Targeting/set-asides of slots and/or subsidies Ensure more active and ongoing communication with homeless families participating in ECE programs Additional Practice Recommendations: Early Childhood Education Providers Enhance responsiveness to childhood/family trauma

Ensure focus on cognitive and social development Increase emphasis on training for trauma-informed practice Increase attentiveness to issues of classroom structure, behavior management, and security Enhance classroom structure that supports disciplinary strategies Environmental supports for both cognitive and social development

Ensure appropriate staffing Adequate number of personnel Well-trained/prepared for addressing challenges of homelessness Certification of staff Practice Recommendations: Housing Crisis Services Providers Improve sharing of information on ECE options

Promote access to quality ECE options Provide more user-friendly, comprehensive, up-to-date info Facilitate more active/direct contact with ECE providers Facilitate placements close to home/work/training sites Ensure active and ongoing staff training Address ECE issues, resources, and systems protocols

Additional Practice Recommendations: Housing Crisis Services Providers Implement early childhood focused protocols Develop/enhance ECE-focused assessments, action-plans, and referrals Enhance early childhood-friendly practice in homeless settings (e.g., ACF Early Childhood Self-Assessment Tool for Family Shelters) Facilitate/nurture parental skills re: early childhood

Expand parental supports facilitating both cognitive and social development while in housing crisis settings Practice Recommendations: Community Homeless Response Systems Enhance access to transportation assistance Facilitate financial supports and subsidies for ECE

Support more family-sensitive/stable ECE participation Increase access to financial supports/subsidies supporting consumer enrollment/stability in quality ECE programs Expand availability of ECE slots, birth to three Increase # of safe, secure, affordable slots for infants & toddlers Support targeting/set-aside of slots, where possible Address particular need for increased access to infant care Additional Practice Recommendations:

Community Homeless Response Systems Ensure quality of trauma-informed practice Respond to widely shared concerns among parents Increase both recognition and response, across systems Document parental needs & systems challenges

Promote cross-systems awareness of key needs & challenges Help inform mainstream systems practice & policy Concluding Thoughts Homeless parents really are motivated and invested in accessing quality ECE for their kids, and are deserving of more helpful supports in addressing systemic barriers Program staff are open to and in need of better training & supports to facilitate homeless family participation in quality ECE

Increasing thoughtful & strategic cross-systems planning and collaboration is key to success in enhancing homeless family access to quality ECE options Contact Information Charles H. Kieffer, Ph.D. [email protected] The Cloudburst Group 8400 Corporate Drive, Suite 550 Landover, MD 20785-2238 Improving Early Learning Services for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness in Philadelphia

Recommendations for Early Childhood and Housing Support Services Partnerships Amanda Atkinson Managing Director, Child Development and Family Services October 29, 2017 Collection of programs that cultivate, expand, and demonstrate high quality early childhood services QRIS Administrator Federal Head Start Grantee Fund For Quality

PHLpreK Intermediary ERS & CLASS Assessment Early Intervention Service Coordination ECE Workforce Transformation Initiative Parent Child Home Program

Internal partnerships on these initiatives: Early Childhood Action Collective (ECAC) http:// ecactioncollective.org/ Employer Sponsored Childcare ECE Workforce Transformation Initiative Building Early Links for Learning (BELL) PHMCs Scope of Activities with BELL

Landscape analysis of successful approaches Funding Service delivery model Program components Design a model for Philadelphia Whats replicable? Apply to Philadelphia context and resources Try it out Implement Philadelphia pilot LANDSCAPE ANALYSIS Landscape Analysis PHMC performed a national, state and local landscape analysis to identify applicable: Policy and Funding Landscape

Intervention Models Practice Recommendations The process included an analysis of available data, a review of literature, and targeted interviews Percent of Students Experiencing Homelessness in Pennsylvania, by Local Educational Authority (SY1415) Percent of S t u d e n t s Experiencing Homelessness 0.1% - 0.9% 1.0% - 1.9% 2.0% - 3.9% 4.0% - 23.0% N o dat a av ailable Total Students Experiencing Homelessness in

Pennsylvania, by Local Educational Authority (SY1415) To t a l S t u d e n t s Experiencing Homelessness 50 100 500 1,000 N o dat a av ailable School D is t r ic t o f P h il a d e l p h i a Federal, State, and Local Policies and Agencies Policy

State/Local Entity Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), McKinney-Vento, Title I PA Dept of Ed (PDE), School District of Philadelphia (SDP) Early Head Start and Head Start, PreK Counts, HSSAP SDP, PHMC, OCDEL, and other grantees Individuals with Disabilities

Education Act (IDEA) Elwyn, Service Coordinators, SDP, Early Learning Providers Child Care Development Fund (CCDF), Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), CCW Subsidy, QRIS OCDEL, CCIS, Regional Keys City Government Agencies HHS, OHS, MOE, DOH, PHA, CBH Notable Practices

Coordination of Activities & Leveraging of Funds Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge (RTT ELC) Co-location of Services Cross-systems Collaborations Integration of Comprehensive Services Opportunities in Philadelphia PA Child Care Development Fund Plan Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge (RTT ELC) Program-level Prioritization PHL PreK PHILADELPHIA PILOT Model

A locally designed Head Start option for ES/TH residents: Home-based model at ES/TH facilities and in community Meeting all requirements of the HS Home Visiting model The Home Visitor remains with the family throughout geographic instability with the aim of transition to Center-based HS enrollment A family may maintain Home Visiting until Kindergarten Activities and Status To Date 3 potential emergency shelter partners Based on number of age eligible children, administration interest Relationship development between HS and ES

administration Target of 24 enrolled children (viable fiscal scale) Head Start staff participated in onsite information sessions and opportunities for application completion Low interest from families Next Steps Revise intervention model Integrate early learning programming into the ES/TH support model Contrasts with early learning as an add-on to existing EH/TS services Identify and utilize a family partnership model specifically designed for families in emergency housing

Secure funding for services that do not meet qualifications for application of housing supports or Head Start funding How best to apply the new HS Performance Standard allowance of 3% of funded seats (18) for homeless children Thank You Name Karen Hughes Abigail McMahon Alfred Quarles, Jr. Carie Bires Marsha Basloe Grace Whitney Ryan Strack Mary Guertin

Title Executive Director, Vogel Alcove Intake Program Manager, Office of Early Childhood Education, School District of Philadelphia Regional Coordinator, Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness (ECYEH) Program, Office of Student Enrollment and Placement, School District of Philadelphia Policy Manager, Ounce of Prevention Fund Senior Advisor for Early Childhood Development and Education, Administration for Children and Families Director, Connecticut Head Start State Collaboration Office District Liaison for Homeless and Highly Mobile Students, Minneapolis Public Schools

Director, Thames Valley Council for Community Actions Head Start/Early Head Start Programs Questions Amanda Atkinson [email protected] Works Cited 1. National Center for Homeless Education. The McKinney-Vento Definition of Homeless. Available from: http://center.serve.org/nche/legis/mv-def.php. 2. U.S. Department of Education. SY 2014-15 Homeless Students Enrolled (C118). 2016; Available from: http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/edfacts/data-files/school-status-data.html. 3. National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. Common Core of Data, Local Education Agency (School District) Universe Survey Data, 2014-15, Membership. 2016; Available

from: https://nces.ed.gov/ccd/pubagency.asp. 4. National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Summary of Major Amendments on Homelessness and Foster Care in "The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015". 2015; Available from: https://www.theotx.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/ESSA_short_summary_changes.pdf. 5. U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Policy Statement on Meeting the Needs of Families with Young Children Experiencing and at Risk of Homelessness. 2016; Available from: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/echomelessnesspolicystatement.pdf. 6. Child Trends Databank. Homeless Children and Youth: Indicators on Children and Youth. 2015; Available from: http://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/112_Homeless_Children_and_Youth.pdf. 7. Child Trends Databank. Homeless Children and Youth. 2015; Available from: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=homeless-children-and-youth.

8. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. Brain Architecture. Available from: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/key-concepts/brain-architecture/. Works Cited 9. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. Toxic Stress. Available from: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/key-concepts/toxic-stress/. 10. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development: Findings for Children up to Age 4 1/2 Years. 2006. 11. National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Definitions of Homelessness for Federal Programs Serving Children, Youth, and Families. 2014; Available from: http://nche.ed.gov/ibt/sc_eligibility.php. 12. PA Head Start Association. PA's Head Start Programs' Current Enrollment. Available from: http:// paheadstart.org/index.php/head-start-in-pa/list-of-pa-hs-programs/.

13. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start. Head Start Act. 2007; Available from: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/standards/law. 14. Administration for Children and Families. Promising Practices for Children Experiencing Homelessness: A Look at Two States. 2014; Available from: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/final_promising_practice.pdf. 15. National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Summary of Final Head Start Regulations Related to Homelessness. 2016; Available from: http://naehcy.org/sites/default/files/dl/legis/Summary%20of%20Final%20Head%20Start%20Regulations %20Related%20to%20Homelessness%20FINAL.pdf. 16. Administration for Children and Families. Building Partnerships to Address Family Homelessness. Available from: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/building_partnerships.pdf. 17. U.S. Department of Education. Serving Preschool Children through Title I: Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. 2012; Available from:

http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/preschoolguidance2012.pdf. Works Cited 18. National Center for Homeless Education and National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Early Care and Education for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness. McKinney-Vento Law into Practice Brief Series 2013; Available from: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/nche_early_childhood_brief_november_2013.pdf. 19. National Center for Homeless Education. Supporting Homeless Children and Youth with Disabilities: Legislative Provisions in the McKinney-Vento Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. McKinney-Vento Law into Practice Brief Series 2015; Available from: http://nche.ed.gov/downloads/briefs/idea.pdf. 20. Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians' Network. Healing Hands: Mitigating Homeless Childrens' Risk for Developmental Delay. 2009; Available from: https://www.nhchc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Apr09HealingHands.pdf. 21.

Grant, R., et al., The Health of Homeless Children Revisited. Advances in Pediatrics, 2007. 54(1): p. 173-187. 22. Pennsylvania Department of Education. Pennsylvania's Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Program: 2014-15 State Evaluation Report. 2016; Available from: http://www.education.pa.gov/Documents/K-12/Homeless%20Education/2014-15%20Pennsylvania %20ECYEH%20State%20Evaluation%20Report.pdf. 23. Administration for Children and Families Office of Child Care. FY 2015 CCDF Allocations (Inlcuding Realloted Funds). 2015; Available from: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2015-ccdfallocations-including-realloted-funds. 24. Pennsylvania Department of Human Services. Pennsylvania Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Plan with Conditional Approval Letter for FY 2016-2018. 2016; Available from: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/occ/pennsylvania_stplan_pdf_2016.pdf. Works Cited 25. Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness. Meeting the Child Care Needs of Homeless

Families: How Do States Stack Up? 2014; Available from: http://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/ICPH_policyreport_MeetingtheChildCareNeedsofHo melessFamilies.pdf. 26. U.S. Department of Education. IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy Part C (birth - 2 years old). 2004; Available from: http://idea.ed.gov/part-c/statutes. 27. Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning. At-Risk Tracking for Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Homelessness. 2014; Available from: http://www.education.pa.gov/Documents/Early%20Learning/Early%20Intervention/Laws%20Regulations %20and%20Announcements/Announcements/2014/EI%2014-01%20At-Risk%20Tracking%20for %20Infants%20and%20Toddlers%20Experienceing%20Homelessness.pdf. 28. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Governor's Office. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2014 Annual Performance Report. 2015; Available from: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetopearlylearningchallenge/2014apr/paapr2014.pdf. 29. Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness. A Tale of Two Students: Homelessness in New York City Pulic Schools. 2014; Available from:

http://www.icphusa.org/PDF/reports/ICPH_policyreport_ATaleofTwoStudents.pdf. 30. Glazer, J. At a homeless shelter, a pre-K program almost like any other. Chalkbeat 2014; Available from: http://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/ny/2014/07/24/at-a-homeless-shelter-a-pre-k-programalmost-like-any-other/#.V6iQ4PkrKUl. 31. National Center for Homeless Education and National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Early Care and Education for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness. Best Practices in Homeless Education Brief Series 2013; Available from: http://center.serve.org/nche/downloads/briefs/early-childhood.pdf. Works Cited 32. Colangelo, L. and B. Chapman. Homelesss families signing kids up for prekindergarten grow following city push. Daily News 2015; Available from: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/education/ exclusive-homeless-familes-signing-city-pre-k-grow-article-1.2216703. 33. Administration for Children and Families Office of Head Start, Program Information Report, 2015. 2016.

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