NW CSC - Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate

NW CSC - Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate

NW CSC - Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Tsagaglalal - She Who Watches Coyote: Soon the World Will Change Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Tribal communities are among the most climate-sensitive communities in the Pacific Northwest Over the next 50 years, climate change will directly affect the abundance of culturally significant foods, such as salmon, deer, root plants, and berries. These foods provide important ceremonial, subsistence, and

commercial uses and hunting, fishing, and gathering rights are guaranteed by treaty, executive order, and trust obligations of the federal government. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Increasing the climate resilience of tribal communities is critical to ensuring access to resources protected by right and vitally important to the cultural existence and economic vitality of these communities. However, most Tribes have limited information, technical capacity, and resources to adequately plan and adapt to Climate Change impacts on these critical resources. Columbia River Basin Tribes

Climate Change Capacity Assessment So what is the strategy for federal agencies to help Tribes achieve these goals and comply the Presidential Order 13175 and Secretarial Order 3289? How do federal agencies determine what the impacts of Climate Change are on Tribal governments, what is the Tribes capacity, and what are their needs? This project will help assess capacity and identify needs Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Project Summary: Conduct a Tribal capacity assessment of 15 Columbia Basin Tribes and 3 Inter-Tribal Organizations related to their technical, scientific, policy, and programmatic funding for Climate Change

preparedness and adaptation. The 6 objectives of the project are to: 1.Assess the level of Columbia Basin Tribes awareness of the federal, state, tribal, and local government agencies climate change plans, scientific analysis, policies, and initiatives; Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Project objectives (contd): 2.Assess the climate-change expertise of each Tribal and intertribal organization and their ability to use that expertise to implement actions and policies related to climate change impacts; 3.Identify existing or planned tribal and Inter-tribal efforts and innovative methods to effectively mitigate and adapt to climate change;

4.Identify opportunities to foster and facilitate cross-tribal, state, and federal agency collaboration on and dissemination of effective and innovative climate change practices; Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Project objectives (contd): 5. Determine the level of participation in strategic and programmatic operations to address national and regional climate adaptation and mitigation issues; and 6. Identify the policy, technical, scientific, legal, and programmatic needs of Columbia Basin Tribes.

Tribal Partners Oregon (3) - Burns Paiute Tribe (Burns, OR) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (Pendleton, OR) Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation (Warm Springs, OR) Idaho (4) - Coeur dAlene Tribe (Plummer, ID) Kootenai Tribe (Bonners Ferry, ID)

Nez Perce Tribe (Lapwai, ID) Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation (Fort Hall, ID) Montana (1) - Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation (MT) Nevada (2) - Fort McDermitt Paiute Shoshone Tribes (McDermitt, NV) Shoshone Paiute Tribe of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation (Owyhee, NV)

Washington (5) - Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Nespelem, WA) Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Toppenish, WA) Cowlitz Indian Tribe (Longview, WA) Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Usk, WA) Spokane Tribe of Indians (Wellpinit, WA) Inter-Tribal Organizations (3) -

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (Portland, OR) Upper Columbia United Tribes (Spokane, WA) Upper Snake River Tribes (Boise, ID) Intertribal Partners 3 Intertribal Organizations: Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission: Nez Perce, Umatilla, Yakama & Warm Springs Tribes Upper Columbia United Tribes: Colville, Coeur dAlene, Kalispel, Spokane, & Kootenai Tribes Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation: Shoshone-Bannock, Shoshone-Paiute, Burns-Paiute, Ft. McDermitt Paiute-Shoshone

Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment - Methods The Tribal Leadership Forum conducted 3 levels of inquiry: electronic survey questionnaire, phone interviews, and when possible, on-site meetings and interviews Project Duration 12 months: Oct. 2014-Oct. 2015 This assessment of Tribal capacity and needs will inform federal agencies, such as the NW CSC, to more effectively support climate resilience planning and implementation priorities in tribal communities of the Columbia River Basin. UCUT

CRITFC USRT 11 Columbia River Basin Tribes Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Surveys, Interviews, and Meetings Worked with Tribal Natural Resource Directors, Environmental Managers, Fish and Wildlife Managers, or Climate Change leads and Tribal Council & Committees Survey responses from 12 Tribes (80%) and all three (100%)

Intertribal organizations. Overall our response rate to the survey questionnaire was 83%. 3 Tribes (Spokane, Shoshone-Bannock, Paiute-Shoshone) that did not respond to the surveys - were swamped addressing wildfire impacts, lacked staff resources, or were uncertain of the benefits of the climate assessment. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Survey Participants Burns Paiute Tribe - Brandon Haslick, Jason Kesling, and Erica Maltz Coeur dAlene Tribe - Alfred Nomee and Tiffany Allgood Colville Tribe - Rhonda Dasher Cowlitz Tribe -Taylor Aalvik Kalispel Tribe - Kenneth Merrill Kootenai Tribe - Kevin Greenleaf

Nez Perce Tribe - Aaron Miles and James Holt Salish and Kootenai Tribes - Mike Durglo Shoshone Paiute Tribe - Duck Valley - Heather Lawrence and Jinwon Seo Umatilla Tribe - Rod Skeen, Carl Scheeler, Carl Merkle, and Patrick Mills Warm Springs Tribe - Robert Brunoe, Jonathan Treasure, and Pah-tu Pitt Yakama Nation - Phillip Rigdon Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission - Paul Lumley and Laura Gephart Upper Columbia United Tribes - D.R. Michel and John Sirois Upper Snake River Tribes - Heather Ray, Scott Hauser, and Robert Austin Numerous Tribal Council, Tribal Committee, and Tribal staff representatives which attended meetings on the assessment Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Impacts

Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Impacts Yakama Nation views these impacts comprehensively climate change is having a major impact, drought this summer has exacerbated problems on the reservation including catastrophic fire, warm water, water quality, low flows, timing of traditional foods, habitat for wildlife, water rights, air quality, and agriculture within the reservation. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Economic Impact Impact to forest/timber sales from wildfire, disease, insects, and/or

reduced growth The impacts of increasingly dangerous and extensive wildfires manifest themselves economically in damage to property, to furnish the salaries of wildland firefighters, and potentially in decreased tourism dollars. Large fires impact our forest economy and two fires in the last three summers will have a major impact on timber available in the long-term. Impact to Traditional Foods Fewer resources would be available for harvest with much more effort for our people to collect resources; there would be a noticeable impact associated with the economies of tribal members. It is almost impossible to put a number on what value is lost to the coming generations and their ability to fish for salmon or access their First Foods. Impact to Agricultural production

Other Impacts -Tourism, Fish & Wildlife Permits, etc. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Level of Awareness Nez Perce Tribe: The tribe needs to collectively understand the climate change impacts and not leave it up to one employee or several employees to guess at what changes are coming. Information and education is key for the tribe to begin tackling this issue. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Level of Engagement OVERALL - Less than 50% of the 15 Columbia River Basin Tribes and 3

Intertribal organizations are aware of and engaged in federal, state, tribal, and local government agencies climate change planning efforts CRT - Nearly all 15 Tribes and 3 Intertribal organizations formed the Columbia River Basin Tribes Coalition (Coalition) and actively use this Coalition to coordinate their participation in the U.S. Canada Columbia River Treaty (CRT) review process LCCs - Only five Tribes (Salish-Kootenai, Umatilla, Colville, Nez Perce, and Yakama) are actively involved in LCCs and only two (CRITFC and USRT) of the 3 Intertribal organizations

Bureau of Indian Affairs - Tribal Cooperative Landscape Conservation Program. This federal program is now the primary funding source of Tribal climate planning activities. Lack of dedicated funding and staffing has been the primary limiting factor for tribal awareness and engagement Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Level of Engagement LCCs Great Northern LCC Tribal Representatives Steering Committee

Eric Quaempts Carl Scheeler (alt) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Aaron Miles Nez Perce Tribe Steve Lozar Salish Kootenai Tribe Phil Rigdon Yakama Nation Great Basin LCC Tribal Representatives Ed Naranjo Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation

Kim Townsend Duckwater Shoshone Tribe Gaylor Robb Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Heather Ray Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation Vacant Tribal/Alaska Native/First Nations Representatives Alaska Eric Morrison Alaska Native Brotherhood Ray Paddock III (Alt) Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska British Columbia

Vacant Washington Terry Williams Preston Hardison (Alt) Eliza Ghitis (Alt) Oregon George Smith California Joe Hostler Regional David Redhorse / Keith Hatch Don Sampson Tulalip Tribes

Tulalip Tribes Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission Coquille Indian Tribe Yurok Tribe Bureau of Indian Affairs Pacific Region Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Level of Engagement Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Adequacy of Existing Plans Colville Tribe: Current Tribal plans have not been updated to include

climate impacts - that is what we are in the process of doing NW CSC - Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment 7 Tribes (Burns-Paiute, Shoshone-Paiute, Paiute-Shoshone, Spokane, Kootenai, Kalispel, and Cowlitz) and UCUT have not completed any vulnerability or risk assessments to date, primarily due to a lack of funding. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Impacts Assessments & Adaptation Plans 1. Salish-Kootenai Tribe Salish-Kootenai Climate Change Strategic Plan (completed 2013), Tribal Collaboration to Address Climate Change in the Crown of the Continent (in development) 2. Nez Perce Tribe Clearwater River Sub-basin Climate Change Adaptation

(completed 2011) 3. Coeur d' Alene Tribe Climate Change Impact Assessment Project 4. Colville Tribe Develop Climate Adaptation Plans, Vulnerability Assessments, and Data Analysis 5. Yakama Nation Climate Adaptation Plan: Technical Analysis and Planning for the Future 6. Umatilla Tribe CTUIR Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan and Implementation Strategy 7. Warm Springs Tribe Vulnerability Assessment for the Warm Springs Reservation 8. Shoshone-Bannock Tribe Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Plan for the Fort Hall Reservation 9. Upper Snake River Tribes Collaborative Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Funding - BIA

Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Staff Capacity Cowlitz Tribe: We currently have qualified staff. One problem is that we are a grant based department with little funding at this time to dedicate current staff on this endeavor Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Staff Capacity & Funding Securing stable funding for each the Tribes or Intertribal organizations to have a dedicated staff person to lead climate change planning will be an important strategy to improve Tribal planning capacity as well as engagement in regional and national climate planning forums .

Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Training & Technical Support Needs Learning from other Tribes who have developed climate impact assessments or adaptation plans; Training on climate vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning; Documenting and incorporating TEK; How to effectively conduct outreach and engagement of tribal communities; Downscaling of climate models to analyze their local resource impacts; Basic climate change planning education for Tribal leaders, community members, and non-natural resource department managers.

Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Traditional Ecological Knowledge UCUT states, the Tribes have sensed the effects of climate change in the root gathering, berry picking, salmon fishing activities in all of their lands. The behaviors are dramatically different than the normal variations that the elders have experiences over the centuries. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations 1. Protect natural resources and first foods a. Key Impacts include water quality and quantity, fish and habitats / passage, forests and wildlife preparedness, Columbia River hydropower operations, range, wildlife, and habitat

b. Capacity and Resources include the development of comprehensive vulnerability and risk assessment, adaptation plans, and effective strategies to implement climate actions plans to protect these important resources. c. Treaty Rights Executive Order, and Trust Obligations: Federal and state resource agencies must work with Tribes to develop collaborative and strategic approaches to address legal, institutional, research, and management actions and polices to restore natural and cultural resources protected by treaty rights, executive order, and trust obligations that will be impacted by climate change. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations 2.

Increase funding and staffing for climate planning and climate forum participation, analysis and research, infrastructure, and building tribal staff capacity. a. Federal Funding: Lack of dedicated funding and staffing has been the primary limiting factor for tribal awareness and engagement in federal, state, tribal, and local government agencies climate change planning efforts. Nine of Tribes or Intertribal organizations estimated their climate change funding needs for the period 2016 through 2020. The minimum funding need for those 9 Tribes and Intertribal organizations exceed $30.5 million over the next five years. Additional climate change funding will be needed for the remaining six Tribes (Kootenai, Paiute-Shoshone, Salish-Kootenai, Shoshone

Bannock, Shoshone-Paiute, Spokane). Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations b. Specific Needs: Seven Tribes (Burns-Paiute, Shoshone-Paiute, Paiute-Shoshone, Spokane, Kootenai, Kalispel, and Cowlitz) and UCUT have not completed any vulnerability or risk assessments to date, primarily due to a lack of funding. c. BIA: CRITFC recommends that within BIA an Office of Climate Change Adaptation be established that will facilitate information sharing and support for the tribes in the following areas, and as needed: Establishment of a consistent funding stream to sustain tribal capacity building for climate-related activities; Climate change vulnerability assessment; and

Climate Change Adaptation Plans 3. Increase education and outreach to the Tribal community and within Tribal government on the causes and impacts of climate change, vulnerability and risk assessments, utilization of TEK in climate planning, and climate adaptation strategies. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations 4. Improve partnerships, training and technical support, and effective regional coordination with federal, tribal, state agencies, and other organizations to improve cooperating agencies/organizations ability and willingness to work with the Tribes and develop comprehensive plans, climate change data, research, and analysis. a. Tribes learn from each other: The capacity to address climate

change varies by tribe. It is important Tribes learn from each other, especially from Tribes who have developed climate impact assessments or adaptation plans; Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations b. Partner organization support. The 15 Tribes and 3 Intertribal organizations identified the Pacific NW Tribal Climate Project, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professional (ITEP), Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC), and the North Pacific, Great Northern, and Great Basin LCCs, and ATNI as external organizations with the expertise, training resources, data, and analytical capacity to support them in climate resiliency planning and capacity building. These partner organizations can help increase Tribal climate change capacity

and resiliency by: 1. Providing training on climate vulnerability and risk assessments and adaptation planning, propose common formats for developing those plans, and innovative strategies to fund implementation of those plans; Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations 2. Tribal models for documenting, preserving, protecting, and incorporating TEK; 3. How to effectively conduct outreach and engagement of tribal communities; 4. Downscaling of climate models to analyze their local resource impacts; 5. Provide access to data and tools, and develop or

disseminate guidance to support Tribal decisionmaking; and 6. Basic climate change impacts and planning education for Tribal leaders, community members, and nonnatural resource department managers including workshops, community conferences, informational videos and brochures, etc. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations It is recommended these organizations meet with each of the respective Tribes and Intertribal organizations to develop action plans to provide specific training, technical support and climate modeling analysis and data. NW CSC (and North Central CSC) provide more specialized expertise, analysis, and support to the Tribes or Intertribal organizations who have completed or are now developing vulnerability assessment or

adaptation plans. Tribes or Intertribal organizations that have not developed vulnerability assessments, the respective LCCs, ITEP, the NW Tribal Climate Project, and ATNI should provide webinars, workshops, and outreach strategies as a first step to help prepare them to conduct vulnerability assessments. Improving outreach to Tribes, funding participation (travel), and increasing the level of Tribal and Intertribal organization engagement in each of these forums will help improve Tribal and interagency collaboration. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations The Columbia River Basin Tribes CRT Coalition could serve as a forum for cross-tribal collaboration to address Columbia River Basin-wide policy and technical issues related to climate impacts.

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) provides important region-wide Tribal policy level events including the Tribal Leaders Summit and three ATNI conventions each year. ATNI could serve to provide a regional forum to coordinate and promote climate change policy issues with the 15 Columbia River Basin Tribes and 3 Intertribal organizations as well as address national and international climate policy. Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC) has a specific Tribal Engagement Strategy which identifies opportunities to support tribal, state, and federal agency collaboration. Will soon recruit a tribal Climate Extension Support Liaison who will work with Northwest tribes to identify priority climate information and knowledge needs of tribes Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment - Recommendations

NW CSC - Develop data and information sharing protocols which respect sensitive Tribal data and TEK while also meeting grant reporting and project deliverable requirements. The Intertribal representatives to the Executive Stakeholder Advisory Committee (ESAC) of the NW CSC will also need to increase outreach to the Columbia River Basin Tribes so they better use the various services of the NW CSC. North Pacific, Great Northern, and Great Basin LCCs It is recommended that to more effectively utilize these LCCs in coordinating Columbia River Basin Tribes climate issues, the LCC

Tribal representatives and the 15 Columbia River Basin Tribes and 3 Intertribal organizations should convene semi-annually. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment Recommendations LCC Governance - The Tribal/First Nations Committee is a unique component of the governance structure of the NPLCC as compared to the Great Northern and Great Basin LCC governance structure where this Tribal/First Nations standing committee does not exist. This model of Tribal participation in the governance and decision making of the NPLCC has established an effective Tribal/First Nations engagement strategy that the Great Northern and Great Basin LCCs should adopt to improve Tribal engagement and effectiveness, as well as providing equitable representation and recognition of sovereign status of Tribal governments.

NW Tribal Climate Change Project, ITEP, and ATNI should more closely coordinate on the dissemination of climate change resources, profiles, publications, and collaborate on developing specific training opportunities to meet the needs of the Columbia River Basin Tribes and Intertribal organizations. Columbia River Basin Tribes Climate Change Capacity Assessment - Recommendations 5. Effectively engage Tribal leadership and executive management in Tribal climate change planning efforts in order to improve coordination and get support for climate planning, adaptation, and management actions. 6. Address Tribal, community, and individual health related to climate change by identifying and demonstrating the potential impacts to individual and community health and incorporating this information into climate adaptation strategies.

7. Utilizing Traditional Ecological Knowledge. The Tribes and Intertribal organizations should clearly identify a strategy and process on how to best incorporate TEK in their climate change assessment and adaptation efforts including, but not limited to: Local-scale expertise A source of climate history and baseline data Formulating research questions and hypotheses Insight into impacts and adaptation in communities The Institute for Tribal Government & Tribal Leadership Forum Don Sampson, Executive Director [email protected] or [email protected] Peggy Harris, Program Coordinator

[email protected] or [email protected] (503) 725-9000 office (541) 215-2753 mobile

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • WHMIS and the classification of matter - Mr. Murray Science 8

    WHMIS and the classification of matter - Mr. Murray Science 8

    What do you think whmis stands for? Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System. Have an open discussion with ideas written on the board - Tell them what it stands for = Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
  • Characters in Lord of the Flies

    Characters in Lord of the Flies

    It also represents the island, on which the boys are stuck. Piggy's Glasses . ... the darkness of man's hear, and the fall through the air of true, wise friend called Piggy"( Golding 202). ... What is a literary analysis...
  • Statistics - Contents

    Statistics - Contents

    Collecting Data 3. Organizing Data 4. Summarizing and Displaying Data. 5. Analyzing data and Drawing Conclusions. 6. Writing a report. * Collecting Data (2/3) Data Sources External Data available by doing Research. Internal You need to generate the data yourself....
  • Hasta Güvenliği - Erciyes Üniversitesi

    Hasta Güvenliği - Erciyes Üniversitesi

    Hasta Güvenliği Prof. Dr. H. Erdal Akalın Cancer patient, 18, critical after drug injection blunder. Daily News 2001; 24 Jan./ 18 yaşında kanser tanısı konmuş bir hasta ilaç verilmesindeki bir karışıklıktan sonra kritik durumda.
  • Calvin vs Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice

    Calvin vs Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice

    Prevenient Grace . porch / courtship . Justifying Grace . door / wedding. Sanctifying Grace . living room / marriage. Calvin's View of Salvation. From start to finish God's work. Effectual or irresistible. Salvation as union with Christ & faith...
  • Charlotte Bronte - Mrs. Poncy's Senior Class

    Charlotte Bronte - Mrs. Poncy's Senior Class

    Charlotte Brontë and Jane Eyre ... Characters in Jane Eyre Mr. Brocklehurst - The cruel, hypocritical master of the Lowood School, Mr. Brocklehurst preaches a doctrine of privation, while stealing from the school to support his luxurious lifestyle. Maria Temple...
  • Analysis of Algorithms - University of Pennsylvania

    Analysis of Algorithms - University of Pennsylvania

    Bottom line: Forget the constants! * Simplifying the formulae Throwing out the constants is one of two things we do in analysis of algorithms By throwing out constants, we simplify 12n2 + 35 to just n2 Our timing formula is...
  • Immigrants in America

    Immigrants in America

    Immigrants in America Millions of immigrants moved to the United States in the late 1800's & early 1900's. Immigration Stations Once immigrants arrived in the U.S., they went through immigration stations, such as Ellis Island in New York Harbor.