Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocates October 10th

Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocates October 10th

Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocates October 10th 8:45 1:00 p.m. Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Thank you for coming! Appreciation to OSPI, Migrant Education Helen Malagon Sylvia Reyna Lupe Ledesma Sunnyside School District Dr. Richard Cole MSDR Lee Campos Heather Garcia Mendoza Segment 1: MGS/MSA

Roles and Responsibilities Large Group Activity Fiesta Time Migrant Students at a Glance Academic Press, Social Support, Relational Trust A Research Based Model MGS/MSA Roles and Responsibilities MGS/MSA Time Management Activity Slice of Life Major Functions Listed in New MGS - MSA Job Descriptions MGS/MSA Job Descriptions Definition of a Migrant Student Seven Areas of Concern Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Migrant Graduation Specialist Job Description General Description: The graduation specialist will act as a liaison and facilitator to school counselor for migrant students to successfully transition to next grade level, complete high school, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. The specialist will: (MGS) 1. Implement a case management model focused on providing

supplemental support and intervention strategies to address the unique needs of migrant students. 2. Work with the districts Migrant Education Federal Programs director and school staff to identify and establish program and student goals in alignment with the districts local plan and the State Service Delivery Plan. 3. Coordinate and ensure access to other services migrant students may be eligible and entitled to receive. Requirements: (MGSr) 4. Teaching credential or bachelors degree in a related field. 5. Experience working with at-risk migrant students and families. 6. Knowledge of secondary school programs and state and local graduation requirements. 7. Written and verbal communication skills in English and primary language of target population (e.g., Spanish, Russian). 8. Knowledge of basic computer software programs (e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint). 9. Experience working independently, semi-independently, and in collaborative teams. 10. Human relations, time management, and personal organizational skills. 11. Flexible work schedule.

Preferred Knowledge and Skills: (MGSks) 12. Knowledge of economic, social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing migrant students. 13. Experience working with secondary school aged migrant students in an educational setting. 14. Knowledge of school and community resources available to migrant students and families, including technical education, career awareness, and postsecondary education opportunities. SEE HANDOUT Major Responsibilities: (MGSmr) 1. Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a caseload of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. 2. Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. 3. Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student

plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level, graduation, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. 4. Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families. 5. Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers. 6. Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community that strengthen communication, self-advocacy, and leadership skills. 7. Facilitate access to school counselor and teaching staff regarding academic needs, including class scheduling to ensure access to required courses for graduation and transition to postsecondary education or employment. 8. Facilitate understanding by student and family of district requirements toward graduation, including High School and Beyond Plan. 9. Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/academic issues that may impact the students ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. 10. Maintain on-going communication with counselor, students, families, and other school staff regarding the progress of the student to achieve established goals and transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment.

11. Participate in professional development opportunities to strengthen skills in working with at-risk migrant students including consolidating credits, determining high school of graduation, motivational techniques, and reporting requirements. Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Migrant Student Advocate Job Description General Description: The advocate will coordinate and facilitate the academic and support needs of migrant students with school counselor to successfully transition migrant students to the next grade level, complete high school, and promote the transition to postsecondary education or employment. The advocate will: (MSA) 1. Work with the districts Migrant Education Federal Programs director and school staff to identify and establish program and student goals in alignment with the districts local plan and the State Service Delivery Plan. 2. Provide supplemental support and services focused on meeting the unique needs of migrant students. 3. Coordinate services with other resources migrant students may be eligible and entitled to receive. Requirements: (MGSr) 4. Experience in an educational or community advocacy-related field.

5. Experience working with at-risk migrant students and families. 6. Knowledge of secondary school programs and state and local graduation requirements. 7. Written and verbal communication skills in English and primary language of target population (e.g., Spanish). 8. Knowledge of basic computer software programs (e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint). 9. Experience working semi-independently and in collaborative teams. 10. Human relations, time management, and personal organizational skills. 11. Flexible work schedule. Preferred Knowledge and Skills: (MGSks) 12. Knowledge of economic, social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing migrant students. 13. Experience working with secondary school aged migrant students in an educational setting. 14. Knowledge of school and community resources available to migrant students and families, including technical education, career awareness, and postsecondary education opportunities. SEE HANDOUT

Major Responsibilities: (MGSmr) 1. Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a roster of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. 2. Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. 3. Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student plans/ goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level and postsecondary education or employment. 4. Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers. 5. Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community that strengthen communication, self-advocacy, and leadership

skills. 6. Facilitate access to school counselor and teaching staff regarding academic needs, including class scheduling to ensure access to required courses for graduation and transition to postsecondary education or employment. 7. Facilitate understanding by student and family of district requirements toward graduation, including High School and Beyond Plan. 8. Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/academic issues that may impact the students ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. 9. Participate in professional development opportunities to strengthen skills in working with at-risk migrant students including motivational techniques and reporting requirements. MGS and MSA Strand and the Job Description Alignment

Always ask yourself, how does this relate to my students? MSAmr:2,3,9, MSAr:6&7, MGSmr:2,3,11 MGSr:6&7, Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level, graduation, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. Support migrant student learning and engagement in the classroom by: Relate classroom learning with real life experiences experiential learning. Use Learning Pyramid to support identification of academic barriers and possible interventions and supports. Utilize activities to promote individualized identification of barriers, development of student plans/goals, choice making, problem solving, etc. 8

FIESTA TIME ACTIVITY SEE HANDOUT FIESTA TIME ACTIVITY SEE HANDOUT MIGRANT STUDENTS AT A GLANCE SEE HANDOUT MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAks:1, MGSks:1 Knowledge of economic, social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing migrant students. WHO QUALIFIES AS A MIGRANT STUDENT? Migratory Child means a child-(1) Who is migratory agricultural worker or a migratory fisher; or (2) Who, in the preceding 36 months, in order to accompany or join a parent, spouse, or guardian who is a migratory agricultural worker or a migratory fisher i.

Has moved from one school district to another; ii. In a State that is comprised of a single school district, has moved from one administrative area to another within such district, or iii. As the child of a migratory fisher, resides in a school district of more than 15,000 square miles, and migrates a distance of 20 miles or more to a temporary residence. Public Law 107-110, Title I, Part C, Section 200.81 rev. Aug 29, 2008. 12 SEVEN AREAS OF CONCERN 1. Educational Continuity: Migrant students experience lack of educational continuity.differences in curriculum, academic standards, homework policies, and classroom routines, inconsistent course placement. Students moving more than three times are likely to fall a full academic year behind stable peers. 2. Instructional Time: Amount of time students spend in class and attendance patterns are impacted = lower levels of achievement. 3. School Engagement: Migrant students are frequently faced with adjustments to new school

setting, making new friends, and social acceptance challenges, which are generally grouped as behavioral, emotional and cognitive, based on Fredricks, Blumenfeld, and Paris (2003). a) Behavioral engagement: opportunities for participation(academic, social, or extracurricular activities.) b) Emotional Engagement emphasizes appeal (positive and negative reactions to teachers, classmates, academic materials, and school in general) determine whether or not ties are createda sense of belonging and feeling valued. c) Cognitive engagement hinges on investment in learning and may be a response to expectations, relevance, and cultural connections. Without engagement, students may be at risk for school failure. Migrant students need avenues that ensure they are valued and have the opportunities that more stable students have. 13 SEVEN AREAS OF CONCERNcontinued 4. English Language Development: English language development (ELD) is critical for academic success. ELD focuses on the literacy skills applicable to content area learning. 5. Educational Support in the Home: Many migrant parents value education for their children, they may not always know how to support their children in a manner consistent with school expectations or have the means to offer an educationally rich home environment. 6. Health: Compromised dental and nutritional status of migrant children. They are at greater

risk than other children due to pesticide poisoning, farm injuries, heat-related illness, and povertyThey are most likely to be uninsured and have difficulties with health care access. Families often need assistance in addressing health problems that interfere with the students ability to learn. 7. Access to Services: Newcomer status and home languages other than English often decrease access to educational and educationally-related services to which migrant children and their families are entitled. Since they are not viewed as permanent residents, services become more difficult to obtain. 14 Academic Press and Social Support Research Based Model Research Focuses on Cognitive and Affective Domain With Academic Achievement Outcomes This research has been acknowledged by Washington State Migrant Education as a viable and pertinent information upon which to base a student advocacy model for migrant students. MGS/MSA Alignment: Supports All MSA Activities, All MGS Activities The following matrix has been designed to show how research supports this triangulated notion of how to achieve migrant student success Sergiovani

Bloom **Annenberg** Cummins/Krashen Daggett Cognitive Domain Academic Press Comprehensi on Rigor Psychomoto r Domain

Social Support Production Relevance Affective Domain Relational Trust Engagement Relationship Migrant Services: Academic Guidance, Non-Academic Guidance, Career Education and Post Secondary Preparation, Student Leadership/Engagement, Social Work/Outreach Developed by T. Romero 2012

Research Based Model Relational Trust 1. Feeling Safe 2. Having something to offer 3. Provide time and expertise Academic Press Provides specific direction embedded in high standards/ goals and belief of success for everyone L E A R N I N

G Social Support Provides assistance/ help in meeting expected standards/goals Just Academic Press and Social Support May Not Be Sustainable. Whats the Missing Piece? Basing reform on these two aspects has been shown to work but may not be sustainable Social Support 100%

students graduating Academic Press Big Three Adding relational trust supports all parties within the reform effort and makes a more stable and sustainable model 100% students graduating Relational Trust

Social Support Academic Press What Is Academic Press? SEE HANDOUT Postsecondary Readiness Curriculum Rigor Postsecondary Prepared and Aware Classroom Press Classroom curricular rigor, pedagogy and assessment Teacher push towards academic performance

School Academic Support Structures Student Academic Preparedness Necessary Collective Teacher/Staff Beliefs Necessary Student Characteristics Persistence/Work Ethic/Beliefs Goals Beyond High School BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN FACILITATING ACADEMIC PRESS? Benefit to Students - Academic Press Academic Press affects student achievement in at least four ways: 1. Provides specific direction for student work and academic

attainment. It points students and teachers to what they need to accomplish. 2. Creates incentives that motivate students and teachers to achieve at higher levels. 3. Enhances student selfconcept students see themselves as a learner. 4. Promotes relational trust What is Social Support? SEE HANDOUT Teacher/Advocate Support Student Orientation

Teacher Characteristics and Beliefs Student Perceptions of Staff Support Support from Outside the School Community Support Parental Support Peer Support Peer Relations Safety Positive Orientation Towards School Sense of Belonging/Extracurricular Engagement Academic Self-Efficacy (Effort/ Optimism)

School Support Student Voice Discipline/Fairness BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN FACILITATING SOCIAL SUPPORT? Benefit to Students - Social Support Creates motivation for students to succeed. Builds confidence of self. Promotes relational trust. Provides psychological safety. Allows students to take risks, admit mistakes, ask for help, experience failure and bounce back (resiliency) MGS and PASS Contact, Sylvia Sanchez, Stanton

Alternative High, with award winning student A Proven Model: Sunnyside High Schools All Hands On Deck (AHOD) Summary Research based model implemented at Sunnyside Senior High where 18% are migrant Proven results: Increased graduation rate in one year from 70.9% to 78.4% High staff: student efficacy All hands on deck with philosophical basis embraced by all (visionary leader) Professional development Staff and student roles are specific and all are held accountable MSA, Alejandra Bobadilla,

at Sunnyside High Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success Henry Ford A Proven Model: Sunnyside High Schools All Hands On Deck (AHOD) Impact AHOD has on a school Builds collaboration between counseling department and school Provides framework for school counseling program Defines the school counseling program Increases the power of data collection Data used to maximize benefit to individual student growth Increases collaboration for utilizing school and community resources. Increases collaboration for parent partnership in

their childs education. A Proven Model: Sunnyside High Schools All Hands On Deck (AHOD) Counseling Department Structure of AHOD Senior Counselor Grade Level Counselors School Psychologist Migrant Grad Specialist Admin Intervention Counselor School Social Worker A Proven Model: Sunnyside High Schools All Hands On Deck (AHOD)

SSD Graduation Rate Trend Graduation Year 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Graduation Rate 46.0% 49.9% 49.7% 64.8% 70.9% 78.4% est. 81%-83.4% Together Academic Press

Social Support BUILDS RELATIONSHIPS AND CONNECTS Migrant Students In classroom Within the school SHOULD THE MGS/MSA CONDUCT RESEARCH BASED ADVOCACY DUTIES? YES! IT ALL TIES TOGETHER Major Functions Listed in New MGS - MSA Job Descriptions Overview of Positions Job Functions

Definitions of Major Functions/Sample Strategies MGS, Josh Barbosa, Mabton, in action with students MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAmr:2-9, MGSmr:2-11 Migrant Student Advocacy Intervention on behalf of migrant students. The coordination or facilitation of access to academic press and social support activities to successfully: transition migrant students to the next grade level, support students to complete high school, and promote student transition to postsecondary education/employment.

MGS and MSA CASE LOAD AND OVERVIEW MGS = 1 FTE : 50 students indepth one-on-one mentoring/case management service for most at risk; monitors academics Degreed individual Collaborates with all to develop an individualized plan of action for academic achievement (a template will be shared) Coordinates academic activities with teachers and counselors Facilitates access to services

*Full Time Equivalent MSA = 1 FTE : 150 students monitors academic progress Follows lead of administrator May work with students in small group format Collaborates with all to develop an individualized plan of action for academic achievement (a template will be shared) Facilitates access to services MAJOR MGS and MSA FUNCTIONS -- SEE HANDOUT

Advocacy Services Prioritized as Funded by the MEP MGS= 1 FTE: 50 students Self initiates; collaborates with all; indepth one-on-one mentoring and case management service for most at risk; monitors academics; coordinates academic activities with teachers and counselors; facilitates access to services MSA= 1 FTE: 150 students Follows lead of administrator; monitors academic progress; may work with students in small group format;

facilitates access to services SEE HANDOUT Academic Guidance Priority 1 Conducted by all MGSs and MSAs Non-Academic Guidance Social Work/Outreach Priority 2* Priority 3

Conducted by MGSs and MSAs with .5 and above FTE Conducted by MGSs and MSAs with full time FTE Student Engagement Priority 2* Conducted by MGSs and MSAs with .5 and above FTE Career Education and Postsecondary Preparation Priority 2*

Conducted by MGSs and MSAs with .5 and above FTE *Staff with less than a full time FTE may modify level of service as FTE and time permit. Note: All services are intended as intervention to ensure high school graduation and are centered on ensuring ACADEMIC success and postsecondary transition. All services focus on the unique and supplemental needs of the migrant student. Staff may NOT supplant services and activities available to all students through the school. MGS/MSA Responsibilities and Research Based Model Activity Research Based Model Relational Trust 1. Feeling Safe 2. Having something to offer 3. Provide time and expertise Academic Press Provides specific

direction embedded in high standards/ goals and belief of success for everyone L E A R N I N G Social Support Provides assistance/ help in meeting expected standards/goals What Is My Job?

MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies Academic Guidance SERVICE DEFINITION PRIORITY LEVEL Priority 1 Support in: Development of High School and Beyond Plan All staff unique to intended school of graduation conduct this Supplemental instruction to stay on track to service complete graduation requirements in not more than 5 years of high school Transition from ESL to mainstream classes

Credit accrual: o Tracking of high school credit accrued across schools attended o Analysis of credit accrual status; collaboration with counselors for appropriate placement o Participation in alternative credit practices o Receipt of credit for partial coursework MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION Migrant Graduation Specialists and Migrant Student Advocates Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level, graduation, and transition to postsecondary education or employment.

Facilitate access to school counselor and teaching staff regarding academic needs, including class scheduling to ensure access to required courses for graduation and transition to postsecondary education or employment. Migrant Graduation Specialists Only Same as above Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families SEE HANDOUT STRATEGY EXAMPLES

Collaborate with counselor to interpret students current transcript and/or assist the students counselor in translating a provided educational record from Mexico and awarding appropriate high school transfer credit. Identify, research, and document partially completed coursework; support counselor in combining it to meet a requirement. Collaborate with the teachers and follow up on issues affecting academic achievement e.g. (is homework turned in daily and

especially after excused absences and/or are teachers, parents, and students communicating, etc) Support preparation and transfer of educational records for students move to another school. Utilize the High School and Beyond plan to support the student and family in understanding the district requirements towards graduation and advocating for proper placement and to monitor their individual progress. Interact with and advocate for individual student needs with instructors. Conduct in-classroom Learning Walks to assess migran student classroom engagement, and collaborate with student and teacher. Develop relationships, help students understand relevance, provide social support relative to academic achievement

Continued MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies Non-Academic Guidance SERVICE DEFINITION Coaching on a oneonone ononone one basis to expedite adjustment to and positive interaction with school, peers, and community such as: Guidance for setting personal goals and solving general problems; referral to other school resources, including counseling referrals to address crisis situations, and personal/emotional, school or family/lifestyle challenges Orientation and welcome for students who transfer midterm

between schools Individual support to improve likelihood of PRIORITY LEVEL MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION Migrant Graduation Specialists and Migrant Student Advocates Priority 2* Conducted by staff with about half time and above FTE. *Staff with less than a

full time FTE may modify level of service as FTE and time permit. Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various healthrelated related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/academic issues that may impact the students ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or

pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. Migrant Graduation Specialists Only Same as above Maintain onrelated going communication with counselor, students, families, and other school staff regarding the progress of the student to achieve established goals and transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families. STRATEGY EXAMPLES

Collaborate with staff to identify discipline, general attendance, gang related or motivational issues and collaborate or refer to counselor or other district/community resource. Help student see applicability of classes. Support student in identifying and communicating his/her interests and goals with the counselors, parents, teachers, etc. (role playing) Develop relationships, help students understand relevance, provide social support relative to academic achievement. Continued MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies Career Education and Postsecondary Preparation

SERVICE DEFINITION Participation in: Structured career awareness options, e.g. access to career role models, professions, interest surveys, career fairs, career and technical training programs Formally structured training or individualized support on job seeking/obtaining skills College and campus visits Formally structured support for application to postsecondary educational institutions PRIORITY LEVEL MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION Migrant Graduation Specialists and Migrant Student Advocates

Priority 2* Conducted by staff with about half time and above FTE. *Staff with less than a full time FTE may modify level of service as FTE and time permit. Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student

plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level, graduation, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers. Migrant Graduation Specialists Only Same as above. Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families. STRATEGY EXAMPLES

Facilitate or coordinate access to activities/resources that will promote ongoing communication in: Providing student access to innovative opportunities for student to distinguish his/her college and scholarship applications from the competition. Student participation in education fairs, campus visits, higher education role models, etc. Identification career education programs in district and community e.g., internal and external job internships, awareness of vocational/technical classes and partnerships, etc. Promote family access to culturally relevant role models. Develop relationships, help students understand relevance, provide social support relative to academic achievement. NOTE on evaluation of events: Districts that will provide programrelated funded migrant student events/activities, e.g., guest speakers, college visits, etc. should demonstrate the following:

a. Documentation that the identified needs of migrant students have been addressed in accordance with state priorities and activities/events are feasible and do not reduce services to address priority needs. b. A description of how the event/activity will be evaluated for its impact on academic achievement of participating students. c. Documented plan describing how the students experience in event/activity will have an onrelated going component that builds on school academics and postrelated secondary goals. Continued MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies SERVICE DEFINITION Formally structured small or large group activities to: build supportive networks, develop personal and interpersonal skills to enhance feeling

of belonging in the school, and lead to school engagement and academic achievement. Student Leadership/ Engagement Projectrelated based locally developed student activities that will foster home and school engagement and increase academic achievement. PRIORITY LEVEL Priority 2* Conducted by staff with about half time and above FTE.

*Staff with less than a full time FTE may modify level of service as FTE and time permit. MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION Migrant Graduation Specialists and Migrant Student Advocates STRATEGY EXAMPLES Facilitate or coordinate access to activities/resources that will: Coordinate access to services available

Model and support student development of through school district and/or effective communication, selfrelated advocacy, community that strengthen leadership and action planning skills using communication, self-advocacy, and research based learning strategies leadership skills. Promote family access to culturally relevant role models. Identify and support migrant students in gaining access to and participating in extracurricular activities. Develop relationships, help students understand relevance, provide social support relative to academic achievement. NOTE on evaluation of events: Districts that will provide programrelated funded migrant student events/activities, e.g., guest speakers, college visits, etc. should demonstrate Migrant Graduation Specialists Only

the following: a. Documentation that the identified needs of Same as above. Develop mentor relationship with student migrant students have been addressed in accordance with state priorities and activities/ caseload to facilitate needs of migrant events are feasible and do not reduce services students and their families. to address priority needs. b. A description of how the event/activity will be evaluated for its impact on academic achievement of participating students. c. Documented plan describing how the students experience in event/activity will have an onrelated going component that builds on school academics and postrelated secondary goals. Continued MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies SERVICE DEFINITION

PRIORITY LEVEL MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION Migrant Graduation Specialists and Migrant Student Advocates Social Work/Outreach Coordination of activities with parents, other Priority 3 family members, teachers, service agencies, Conducted and others designed to ensure that migrant by Staff families receive full range of services available with about to them. (Excludes identification and full time recruitment process for determination of

FTE . eligibility). Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers. Migrant Graduation Specialists Only Same as above. Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families. STRATEGY EXAMPLES Collaborate with teams of educators, parents, students, and community leaders to identify gaps in school and community

services and leverage resources to meet those needs/ensure migrant family access. Refer students and families to school program and community service representatives in order to facilitate migrant family access. Continued MGS and MSA Supplemental Support Services Definitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies SERVICE DELIVERY APPROACH SERVICE DEFINITION Student Advocacy (MSA) Case Management (MGS) Migrant students served by a program funded graduation specialist following the duties and

responsibilities as outlined in state developed job description. Migrant students served by a program funded student advocate following the duties and responsibilities as outlined in state developed job description. PRIORITY LEVEL MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AS OUTLINED IN JOB DESCRIPTION STRATEGY EXAMPLES Priority 1 All MGS report services with this

delivery approach. Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, No strategies. See definition. and other appropriate staff to develop a caseload of migrant students most atrelated risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. Priority 1 All MGS report services with this delivery approach. Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a No strategies. See definition. roster of migrant students most atrelated risk of not

meeting state academic and achievement standards. Participate in professional development opportunities to strengthen skills in working with atrelated risk migrant students including motivational techniques and reporting requirements. Participate in professional development opportunities to strengthen skills in working with atrelated risk migrant students including consolidating credits, determining high school of graduation, motivational techniques, and reporting requirements. SLICE OF LIFE ACTIVITY SEE HANDOUT MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAr:7, MGSr:7 Human Relations, time management, and personal organizational skills.

MENTOR LEAD SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS Discussion/Reflection Topics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. What did you notice as you completed your time allocation pie chart? What can you learn from seeing how you spend your time? What good choices are you making that support you in prioritizing your activities to accomplish your MGS/ MSA responsibilities in the allotted time (based on your FTE)? What activities are not supporting you in prioritizing

your activities to accomplish your MGS/MSA responsibilities in the allotted time? What did you learn about yourself in doing this exercise? What will you the same or differently when you return to your schools this year? As an MGS/MSA, how could you use this activity when working with your migrant students? SEE MENTOR HANDOUT Segment 2: Migrant Student Selection and Documentation Requirements

Student Selection Washington State PFS Definition Framework for Student Selection/Levels of Support Developing a Caseload and Student Roster Conducting a SNA Documentation of Services MGS/MSA Log Referred Services Hands on Exploration of: Online MGS/MSA Data Analysis Tools, Reports, and Resources How Do I Determine Who To Serve? Student Selection Washington State Priority for Service Definition (pursuant to federal law Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Section 1304(d) Student Needs Assessment Report MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAmr:1 & 2, MGSmr:1&2 Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a roster

of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. Careful Selection of Students Meets Federal Requirements MGS/MSA staff must ensure PFS students needs are met first, before serving other migrant-eligible students. MGS, Estevan Vivanco, Burlington Why not?! Washington State Priority for Service Definition Priority for Service (PFS) students are students:

whose education has been interrupted during the regular school year AND who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet the States challenging State academic content standards and challenging State student academic achievement standards. Washington State Priority for Service Definition SEE HAND O UT Priority for Service - Summary Criterion #1: Interrupted school year AND Criterion #2: Low academic state assessment scores (see handout) When state assessment data is unavailable,

proxy risk factors may be applied. PFS Proxy Risk Factors Language Proficiency students score on Washingtons English Language Proficiency test is within the limited English proficient levels (1, 2, and 3) Retained enrolled in same grade from one school year to next Grade Age / Over age - age does not match acceptable range for grade level placement with in 2 years Credit Deficiency (for secondary age students only) student has not earned sufficient credits per his/her schools graduation requirements and grade level FRAMEWORK FOR SELECTION/SUPPORT SEE HAND O UT

Conducting a Student Needs Assessment Student Needs Assessment For WAMEP School District As of 08/01/2013 SEE HANDOUT FAQs for PFS (need your glossary? ) Question: What if the student is new to the state or district and no data exists? Answer: If the Student Needs Assessment (SNA) report contains no data,* determine if student is Priority for Service (PFS) by conducting local data analysis in alignment with the official state definition of PFS: 1.Interrupted school year (identified through SNA) AND 2.State assessment scores (first) or, if not available, Proxy risk factors: 2a. Language proficiency scores 2b. Retention 2c. Grade/Age Compatibility

2d. Credit deficiency *OSPI guidance: The student data is compiled in the MSIS for students who have been in the Washington State Migrant Education Program or as reported through a national migrant student database, MSIX. However, for students new to the state or school, use local analysis in alignment with PFS criteria, e.g., Interrupted school year, and in the absence of assessment data, use of proxy factors. Question: Must a PFS migrant student be served by the Migrant Education Program? A: No. Once the need for a PFS migrant student has been identified, if there are other non-migrant resources or services that can address the identified need for which a migrant student is entitled and eligible to receive, the Migrant Education Program is not required to provide that same service and could be considered supplant.

MGS, Alejandra Gonzalez, Wenatchee, State Director Helen Malagon, and Ricardo Iniquez, Wenatchee High. Project of the Year through MGS efforts. IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED: Add a column to your SNA report and document the reason a student may have not been selected for the caseload or student roster e.g. participation in GEAR UP, BRIDGES Program, etc. Question: Can non-PFS migrant students be served? A: Yes. After identifying and addressing the needs of PFS migrant students, the needs of migrant students who have not had an interrupted school year may be analyzed for appropriate services using the same academic criteria: State assessment results (if available*) or Proxy Risk Factors: language proficiency scores

retention grade age compatibility credit deficiency *The above student data is compiled in the MSIS for students who have been in the Washington State Migrant Education Program or as reported through MSIX. However, for students new to the state or school, use local analysis in alignment with PFS criteria, e.g., Interrupted school year, and in the absence of assessment data, use of proxy factors language proficiency, retention, grade/age compatible, or credit deficiency. FAQ About Needs Assessment and Pulling Lists of Students to Serve How Often Do I Pull a Roster? Informally, at least monthly (or more frequently to accommodate peak migratory times.) Formally, on a quarterly or seasonal basis with your district administrator. An ongoing conversation with migrant funded recruiter and records clerk would also promote timely service too late or mid-term enrolling students. Where Do I Find the SNA? To access SNA, request

username and password to the Migrant Student Information System (MSIS) at www.msdr.org. Former migrant students, staff and MGS/MSA staff serving as role models for students returning to the Program to advocate and serve! SNA will be available through the Quick links/Ed Staff menu. Do I Print the SNA When I Pull a Roster? Yes. Date and file a copy of the SNA each time you review and select students to be served. How Do I Log That Services to PFS Have Been Provided By Another?

When conducting the needs assessment, it is recommended that the MGS or MSA create a column on the SNA to briefly comment and substantiate why he/she did not select a particular PFS student in the roster/caseload (e.g. served in Special Ed attending Title I after school credit recovery program). To be continued.... BREAK TIME! MGS/MSA Logs of Support Services as Reported into MSIS by MEP Records Clerk Administratively Useful End of Year Report Data Documentation of Services the Paperwork 1. MGS/MSA Log Report your student services daily 2. Referred Services Log when you refer students to educational and community services

3. Locally Developed Documentation of Local Student Events or Activities (academic focus and ongoing component) Reporting Services through the MGS/MSA Log SEE HANDOUT NOTE: The MGS or MSA documentation log and template are available for download at www.msdr.org. To access the pre-filled log with all enrolled migrant students and the last time they received service in the specified area , simply login to the database, select the "Quick-Link Menu"/ "Ed" Tab/"Specialist/Advocate Log". To access the "Specialist/Advocate Documentation Template" simply click on the "MEP clearinghouse"/"Secondary" Tab. The school may replace this log and create its own documentation as long as information reported includes all major functions of the MGS/MSA and direct services are reported in MSIS. Other school records which include personally identifiably information may be kept as documentation of MGS or MSA activity in accordance with school policy. Reporting Services through the MGS/ MSA Log Before you start:

Download blank or prefilled log Save for required reporting to desktop or other file as applicable Corroborate MGS/MSA logging procedures with school documentation system Review definitions of major functions (summary) and report accordingly Reporting Services through the MGS/ MSA Log It is strongly recommended: To log activities on a daily basis Print, file and share a copy of the completed log each month with migrant records clerk. Monthly review the Student Needs Assessment (select the caseload of PFS students to be served, including new students, and re-print updated Log) Archive these confidential files (on an annual basis for auditing purposes) Referred Services - Form

Complete when making educational service referrals outside the school Find form at MSIS under the quicklinks menu/ed staff or at the MSDR.org resources tab. Provide to records clerk. SEE HAND OUT Local Student Events/Activities Required Documentation Does your school conduct student events or activities? Such as: Guest speakers College visits Student conferences College or career fairs If yes, advocate, intervene, ensure, facilitate and coordinate migrant student access to these activities. This is a major

role for an advocate, and particularly if the above support academic achievement. Local Student Events/Activities Required Documentation If utilizing Migrant Education Program funds for local student events/activities, the Program should demonstrate the following: a. Documentation that the identified needs of migrant students have been addressed in accordance with state priorities and activities/events are feasible and do not reduce services to address priority needs. b. A description of how the event/activity will be evaluated for its impact on academic achievement of participating students. c.

Documented plan describing how the students experience in event/activity will have an on-going component that builds on school academics and post-secondary goals. Excerpted from OSPI MEP Webinar (September) - http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/Webinar/2012Sept/MBWebinarMigrant.wmv Local Student Event/Activities Documentation Considerations Tip: Check with your administrator and determine locally developed documentation requirements BEFORE an event or activity. Consolidated Program Review Checklists will be located on OSPI website , http:// www.k12.wa.us/ConsolidatedReview/default.aspx Local implementation of activities as noted in approved grant application. Selection process for migrant students to be served, including Priority for Service. Evidence of logging and reporting of services provided to migrant students.

Evidence of active Identification and Recruitment of eligible migrant students. CPR Review Timeline 2013-14: Districts in ESDs 123 and 189 2014-15: Districts in ESDs 101 and 114 2015-16: Districts in ESDs 121 and 171 2016-17: Chosen districts in ESDs 105, 112, and 113 2017-18: Chosen districts in ESDs 105, 112, and 113 Consolidated Program Review Excerpts of Program Review Checklist Relevant to MGS/MSA MGS: List of student caseload and Migrant-funded services provided Documentation of selection process and log activity sheet demonstrating the intent to meet the identified needs of migrant students, including non-academic/academic activities, student advocacy, and postsecondary education, career exploration. (In conjunction with basic education), description of process to analyze credit accrual needs of students grades 9-12 MSA: Documentation of selection process and log activity sheet demonstrating the intent to meet the identified needs of migrant students, including non-academic/academic activities, student advocacy, and postsecondary education, career exploration.

District wide: Evidence of referrals made and professional development training attended. Online MGS/MSA Data Analysis Tools, Reports, and Resources MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAks:3 and MGSks:3: Knowledge of school and community resources available to migrant students and families, including technical education, career awareness, and postsecondary education opportunities. MSAmr:1 and MGSmr:1: Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a caseload of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. MSAmr:2 and MGSmr:2: Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. MSAmr:4 and MGSmr:5: Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers.

Online MGS/MSA Data Analysis Tools, Reports, and Resources MGS/MSA Alignment: MSAmr:5 and MGSmr:6: Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community that strengthen communication, self-advocacy, and leadership skills. MSAmr:2 and MGSmr:9: Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/ academic issues that may impact the students ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. Academic Guidance in Action SEE HANDOUT A Few Academic Guidance Strategies Placement Considerations Collaboration/Advocacy

High School and Beyond and Migrant Student Plan of Action Coaching and Monitoring Academic Progress Withdrawal Academic Guidance Strategies PLACEMENT CONSIDERATIONS STRATEGIES 1. Collaborate with 2. counselor to interpret students transcript; 3. and identify learning 4. gaps ACTION HOW TOs Top priority in placement: student complete partially completed requirements.

If late entry resulted in placement in Alternative HS, identify how and when the student can return to the regular high school. Identify if student is likely to graduate on time. Identify if placement decisions are supporting completion of CADR requirements in English, math, science, etc. 1. Consult students record in the Migrant Student Information System database. Note partial work completed (Unreported data, withdrawal processed). Support counselor in 2. Verify credit for education in a previous state/country was fairly awarded as transfer credit to the student. combining partially 3. Ensure that as incoming credit is transcripted, required HEC completed Board codes are added as appropriate. coursework to meet a 4. Ensure counselor combines partial credits to satisfy graduation requirement. requirement(s). Academic Guidance Strategies

COLLABORATION/ADVOCACY STRATEGIES ACTION HOW TOs 1. Follow up with teacher/student if homework is being submitted daily especially after excused absences. 2. Formally or informally meet with student to discuss academics. Follow up on 3. Follow up with parent(s) and teacher(s) and ask if each issues affecting party is satisfied with the level of communication amongst academic student, parent, and teachers. achievement 4. Help student prepare for difficult conversations through role playing. 5. Ensure access to teacher and or other staff (as appropriate) to discuss issues/concerns impacting academic achievements. Academic Guidance Strategies

COLLABORATION/ADVOCACY STRATEGIES ACTION HOW TOs Interact with 1. Help teachers and other appropriate staff to and understand the students unique academic advocate for needs resulting from high mobility and the individual migrant lifestyle. student 2. Encourage instructors to accept make up work/ needs with missing assignments when student has excused instructors. (or unavoidable) absences. 3. Identify if instructor offers any additional support for students e.g. one on one instruction time (before school, during lunch, afterschool,

extra credit assignments, etc. Academic Guidance Strategies COLLABORATION/ADVOCACY STRATEGIES ACTION HOW TOs Conduct 1. Follow district etiquette or establish acceptable etiquette classroom with instructors when conducting learning walks. Learning Walks to assess 2. Follow up with student and ask meaningful questions migrant (during or after) to assess level of student engagement. student Use real examples and observations. engagement, and collaborate 3. Follow up with instructor/student: share learning walk

with teacher outcomes, provide feedback and suggestions to increase and student. student engagement e.g. recommended interventions, differentiated instruction methods to accommodate student learning style, note taking strategies, etc. Learning Walks Observing students in classroom helps to: Foster positive relations Develop shared expectations Promote questioning Stimulate interest Assist students to consider and identify processes that will support achievement of the learning goals Tino Barerra, Pasco counselor and Student Leadership Program (SLP)

alumni, Samantha Ruiz, MGS, Wahluke, and Josue Quezada, WSU CAMP Tip for Conducting Learning Walks Meaningful Student Questions In the Classroom Which Promote Academic Achievement and Assess Student Engagement: What are you learning today? What do you understand about the learning? How does topic or goal connect to you? What will you do now with your new learning? Did the learning challenge you? Are you engaged in this class today? Monitoring Academic Progress High School and Beyond Planning and the Migrant Student Plan of Action - Useful Tools

State Templates: Migrant Student Plan of Action Middle School Migrant Student Plan of Action District Models Burlington Edison Student Goal Sheet Moses Lake Ell & Migrant Monitoring Sheet SEE HANDOUTS Migrant Student Plan of Action Setting the foundation for academic planning. Migrant Student Plan of Action Migrant Student Plan of Action Action Planning: Academic, Career/Postsecondary Education, Social/Student Engagement, Physical/Health Migrant Student Plan of Action

Outcomes What about Middle School Student? Setting the foundation for academic planning. What about Middle School Student? Segment 3: MGS/MSA Strategies in Action MGS/MSAs in Action Small Group Skits Quality Team Time Role Play Peer to Peer Feedback/Dialogue MGSs/MSAs IN ACTION QUALITY TEAM TIME ROLE PLAY PROCESS QUALITY TEAMS WILL: Review the case scenario and identify the challenge.

Identify strategies, tools, and resource they could implement to address barrier in case scenario. Plan how to role play being secondary school migrant students, MGS/MSA staff, and other educational staff. Develop 5-8 minute skit. GOOD LUCK! GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK SEE FACILITATOR/ ORIENTATION GUIDE PG. 23 MGSs/MSAs IN ACTION QUALITY TEAM TIME ROLE PLAY PROCESS QUALITY TEAMS WILL:

Have 5-8 minutes to perform their skit. After: one member/observer takes the lead in the reflection. Ask the presenting co-facilitators to describe their own experiences: 1. What happened in presentation? 2. What went well? What specifically made you feel it went well? 3. What did not go well? Specifically what was it that made you feel it did not go well? 4. What strategies, resources, or tools did your group apply? Peers in the audience will describe what they saw and heard, including positives. Peers who performed and audience discuss together: 1. What could have changed to work better how could that change have looked? 2. What other ways of addressing the challenge might be effective? 3. Were there any behaviors or approaches that may hinder

the MGS/MSA from resolving the issue? 4. What techniques could be applied to manage the behavior or approach, resulting in positive outcomes? REFLECTION ON TRAINING COMPONENT Segment 1: MGS/MSA Roles and Responsibilities MGS/MSA Roles and Responsibilities FTE/Prioritizing and Time Management Segment 2: Student Selection and Documentation Requirements Accessing MSIS Tools and Reports Documenting and Reporting Segment 3: MGS/MSA Strategies in Action Case Scenarios (Strategies, Resources, Student Barriers) Segment 4: ESD Program Implementation Planning Review resources:

List of Districts with MGSs/MSAs MGS/MSA Prioritization of Districts Schedule of MGS/MSA Coaching and Support Data Monitoring Prioritization MGS/MSA and FPD Planning Tips Field Office Planning Implementation/Action Planning Time MGS/MSA and FPD TIPS FOR DEVELOPING COLLABORATIONS SEE HANDOUTS SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS Discussion/Reflection Topics: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. What is the current reality at your schools? What collaborations will you encourage your MGS/MSA at your school to strengthen to support migrant students. What are some of the challenges they face in collaborating with others? What seems to be the reason for the challenges? What solution can be used to remedy problem? What could you do as a Field Office to strengthen collaborations? Who could support you in performing your functions and how? Can their FPD help facilitate access to this support/collaboration? ESD PROGRAM PLAN IMPLEMENTATION SESSION

TIPS TO CONSIDER: 1. Consider methods for coaching district staff within your MGS/MSA implementation plan in alignment with your office contracted services. 2. Identify roles/responsibilities of field offices versus districts and possible partners and supports. 3. Identify who will be lead on action items (e.g. Field Office, MGS, MSA, or FPD.) SEE HANDOUTS TRAINING EVALUATION

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