Design History Design in Prehistoric Times Pre-3000 BC

Design History Design in Prehistoric Times Pre-3000 BC Before recorded history, humans constructed stone circles,

megaliths, and other structures. Stonehenge & Avebury England Ancient Design 3000 BC to 337 BC

In ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, civilizations built enormous temples and shrines. Giza Pyramids, Parthenon, Pantheon, King Nebuchadnezzars Palace

Ancient Memphis, Athens, Rome, Babylon Early Christian and Medieval 373 to 500 AD European architecture moved from the rectangular basilica forms to

the classically inspired Byzantine style. Tower of London & Westminster Hall London

Romanesque 500 to 1200 AD As Rome spread across Europe, heavier, stocky Romanesque architecture with rounded arches emerged.

Cathedral of Pisa & Orvieto Cathedral Pisa & Orvieto Gothic Design 1200 to 1400 AD Innovative builders created the

great cathedrals of Europe. Notre Dame & Salisbury Cathedrals Paris & Salisbury Renaissance Design

1400 to 1600 AD A return to classical ideas ushered an "age of "awakening" in Italy, France, and England. The Louve & Florence Cathedral

Paris & Florence American Colonial Design 1600 to 1780 AD European settlers in the New World borrowed ideas from their homelands to create their own

breed of architecture. Independence Hall, City Hall, & Congress Hall Philadelphia Baroque Design

1600 to 1700 AD In Italy, the Baroque style is reflected in opulent and dramatic churches with irregular shapes and extravagant ornamentation. In France, the highly ornamented Baroque style combines with Classical restraint. Russian aristocrats were

impressed by Versailles in France, and incorporated Baroque ideas in the building of St. Petersburg. Elements of the elaborate Baroque style are found throughout Europe. Piazza Navona Rome

Rococo Design 1650 to 1790 AD During the last phase of the Baroque period, builders constructed elegant white buildings with sweeping curves.

Bavarian Homes Oberammergau Georgian Design 1720 to 1800 AD Georgian was a stately,

symmetrical style that dominated in Great Britain and Ireland and influenced building styles in the American colonies The White House, Monticello, & Mount

Vernon Washington, Charlottesville, & Mount Vernon Neoclassical / Federalist / Idealist 1750 to 1880 AD A renewed interest in ideas of

Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio inspired a return of classical shapes in Europe, Great Britain and the United States. U.S. Capital, Mosque of Sultan Ahmed, & Circus at

Bath Washington, Istanbul, & Bath Greek Revival Design 1790 to 1850 AD These classical buildings and homes often feature columns,

pediments and other details inspired by Greek forms. Antebellum homes in the American south were often built in the Greek Revival style. Belle Meade Plantation &

Boothies Dryed Goods Store Nashville & Peninsula Victorian Design 1840 to 1900 AD Industrialization brought many

innovations in architecture. Victorian styles include Gothic Revival, Italianate, Stick, Eastlake, Queen Anne, Romanesque and Second Empire. Eiffel Tower, Tower Bridge,

& OHara Paris, London, & Chicago Arts and Crafts Movement in Design 1860 to 1900 AD Arts and Crafts was a late 19th-century

backlash against the forces of industrialization. The Arts and Crafts movement revived an interest in handicrafts and sought a spiritual connection with the surrounding environment, both natural and manmade. The Craftsman Bungalow evolved from the

Arts and Crafts movement. Gamble House & Davis House Pasadena, California & Eugene, Oregon Art Nouveau Design

1890 to 1905 AD Known as the New Style, Art Nouveau was first expressed in fabrics and graphic design. The style spread to architecture and furniture in the 1890s. Art Nouveau buildings often have asymmetrical shapes, arches and

decorative surfaces with curved, plantlike designs. Behrens House & Casa Mila Darmstadt, Germany & Barcelona, Spain Art Deco Design

1925 to 1935 AD Zigzag patterns and vertical lines create dramatic effect on jazz-age, Art Deco buildings. Chrysler & Empire State Building

New York 20th Century Trends in Design 1900 to Present The century has seen dramatic changes and astonishing diversity. Twentieth

century trends include Art Moderne and the Bauhaus school coined by Walter Gropius, Deconstructivism, Formalism, Modernism, Structuralism and Postmodernism. Maison a Bordeaux,

Harkness Commons, Kunsthal, Seattle Library, & AT&T Bordeaux, Harvard, Rotterdam, Seattle, & New York Resources

http://www.greatbuildings.com/typ es/styles/ http:// architecture.about.com/cs/historicp eriods/a/timeline.htm

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