Response to Literature Sharing responses to a story

Response to Literature Sharing responses to a story . . . From Reading to Writing Stories touch people in different ways. Some readers might like Seventh Grade by Gary Soto because they recognize themselves in Victor. Others might like Zebra by Chaim Potok because they admire Zebras strength.

Response to Literature Sharing responses to a story . . . In a response to literature essay, the writer shares his/her interpretation of a piece of literature. The analysis may include opinions about a character, impressions of the lessons learned, prediction of the authors purpose, and/or similarities and differences to ones own life.

Response to Literature In a response to literature essay, the writer shows thoughtful comprehension beyond plot and explains underlying meaning beyond text. The writer develops an analysis of the literary work and includes support and commentary. Beginning Your Response to Literature 1

READING THE PROMPT Prompt is the question asked about the particular literary work. Highlight key parts of the question. Focus on what the prompt is asking the writer to do in the response. Planning Your Response to Literature

1. Carefully reread the short story. As you read, write down insights you might have. 2. Freewrite about your responses. Spend five minutes writing down your overall response to the story. Identify your reactions, such as sadness, anger, excitement, or curiosity. Planning Your Response to Literature 3. Concisely Summarize the Work. The essay should be 25% summary and 75%

response and analysis. To summarize effectively, use the SOMEBODY WANTED BUT SO strategy. Imagine this strategy to be similar to a movie preview! It must be well-written and concise! Planning Your Response to Literature 3. Concisely Summarize the Work. SOMEBODY = Identify the author and title. Give the main character and setting.

WANTED = Identify what the main character wants. BUT = Identify conflict that the character faces. SO

= Identify what the challenges will be. Planning Your Response to Literature 3. Concisely Summarize the Work. SOMEBODY = Identify the author and title. Give the main character and setting. WANTED = Identify what

the main character wants. BUT = Identify conflict that the character faces. SO = Identify what the challenges will be. Example: In A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Ebenezer Scrooge during the Victorian England Era wants to be left alone with his money.

However, Scrooges night is interrupted by three ghosts that make him face his past, present and future in order to change his personality. Planning Your Response to Literature 3. Concisely Summarize the Work. SOMEBODY = Identify the author and title. Give the

main character and setting. Example: In A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Ebenezer Scrooge during the Victorian England Era wants to be left alone with his money. However, Scrooges night is interrupted by three ghosts that make him face his past, present and future in order to change his personality. Writing Your Response to Literature The writer gets to express his or her response to the prompt. This requires understanding of

the story and INSIGHT. Identifying IMPORTANT WORDS and providing a strong SUMMARY STATEMENT guide the writer in developing INSIGHT! Writing Prompt Would you say that Rip Van Winkle was lazy or just a very easy going fellow? Use specific examples to support your response. Writing Prompt

Make a claim about the solider from The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Use specific examples to support your response. Writing Your Response to Literature 1 Drafting THE introduction Use your introductory paragraph to tell your readers what they need to know about the story and to introduce your response. Develop a clear thesis which answers the

prompt. Writing Your Response to Literature 1 Drafting THE introduction (cont) Title in quotes (story) or underlined (book) Authors first and last name Summary statement: 3-4 sentences in the SWBS format Thesis = Clear, confident answer to prompt I. Paragraph #1: Introduction

1. Title of the fable/story you read and author if you know it. 2. A brief/short summary (a few lines) of story. 3. Thesis Statement (Write what the essay will be about: main idea and 3 insights.) Writing Your Response to Literature 2 Drafting the 3 body paragraphs Pick your best three ideas as answers to

the prompt. Find supportive quotes and provide commentary linking quote to thesis. Do not summarize, but provide a few sentences of background as needed. Writing Your Response to Literature 2 Drafting the 3 body paragraphs Begin each paragraph with a strong topic sentence. Answer the prompt in each topic sentence. Provide proof and commentary for your analysis.

Clearly explain and connect your support back to topic sentence aka a conclusion sentence. II IV. Paragraph #2-4: Body 1. A transition (Example: To begin with, first, next, another example...) 2. Answer prompt with one of your ideas. 3. Write an example/ passage/detail/event/ action or quote (exact words taken from the

text in quotation marks) 4. EXPLAIN how they are related to the topic. Writing Your Response to Literature 3 Drafting the conclusion Restate thesis confidently and clearly Show insight in relation to authors purpose and message to readers. What is the author wanting his or her readers to understand as a result of watching the character handle the conflict?

Identify significance to todays readers. How can the lessons learned be applied to their lives? Writing Your Response to Literature 4 Checklist 1. Are there 5 APPROPRIATE paragraphs? 2. Is there a THESIS statement? 3. Does the body include 3 IDEAS that answer the writing prompt?

4. Does the body include TEXTUAL EVIDENCE for each idea? 5. Does each body paragraph have CLEAR EXPLANATIONS that SUPPORT their topic sentence? 6.Does the conclusion have a RESTATED thesis, INSIGHT of authors message and purpose, and SIGNIFICANCE to readers?

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