Grade 55 th th Teacher Directions Quarter 3

Grade 55 th th Teacher Directions Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Reading 12 Selected-Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed-Response Writing 1 Full Composition (Performance Task) 1 Brief Write 1 Write to Revise Writing w/ Integrated Language 1 Language/Vocabulary 1 Edit/Clarify Sequential Steps Sequential Steps toward Standard toward Standard Mastery Mastery Performance Task Performance Task at Grade Level at Grade Level 55 th th QuarterThree Three Quarter PrePreAssessment Assessment Reading: Literature Grade Three Targets Standards DOK 3 Word Meanings RL.5.4 1-2 6 Text Structures/Features RL.5.7 2 5 Analysis Within and Across Texts RL.5.9 4 Reading: Informational Grade Three

Targets Standards DOK 10 Word Meanings RI.5.4 1-2 11 Reasoning and Evidence RI.5.8 3 12 Analysis Within and Across Texts RI.5.9 4 Note: There may be more standards per target. Writing standards assessed in this assessment are boxed. Narrative Writing and Language Targets Standards DOK 1a Brief Narrative Write W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 3 1b Write-Revise Informational W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 2 2 Full Narrative Composition W-3a, W-3b, W-3c, W-3d, W-4, W-5, W-8, W-9 4 8 Language-Vocabulary Use L.3a L.6 1-2 9 Edit and Clarify

L.5.1a 1-2 All elementary ELA assessments were reviewed and revised in June of 2015 by the following amazing and dedicated HSD K-6th grade teachers. Deborah Alvarado Lincoln Street Ko Kagawa Minter Bridge Linda Benson West Union Jamie Lentz Mooberry Anne Berg Eastwood Sandra Maines Quatama Aliceson Brandt Eastwood Gina McLain TOSA Sharon Carlson Minter Bridge Teresa Portinga Patterson Deborah Deplanche Patterson Judy Ramer Consultant Alicia Glasscock Imlay Sara Retzlaff McKinney Sonja Grabel Patterson Jami Rider Free Orchards Megan Harding Orenco Kelly Rooke Free Orchards Renae Iversen TOSA Angela Walsh Witch Hazel Ginger Jay Witch Hazel 3 Performance Task: Optional

This is a pre-assessment to measure the task of writing an informational article. Full compositions are always part of a Performance Task. A complete performance task would have: Classroom Activity (30 Minutes) Part 1 (35 minutes Independent work) Passages or stimuli to Read 3 Research Questions There may be other constructed response questions. Part 2 A Full-Composition (70 Minutes) Students should have access to spell-check resources but no grammar-check resources. Students can refer back to their passages, notes and 3 research questions and any other constructed responses, as often theyd like. Directions 30 minutes 1. You may wish to have a 30 minute classroom activity. The purpose of a PT activity is to ensure that all students are familiar with the concepts of the topic and know and understand key terms (vocabulary) that are at the upper end of their grade level (words they would not normally know or are unfamiliar to their background or culture). The classroom activity DOES NOT pre-teach any of the content that will be assessed! 35 minutes 2. Students read the passages independently. If you have students who can not read the passages you may read them to those students but please make note of the accommodation. Remind students to take notes as they read. During an actual SBAC assessment students are allowed to keep their notes as a reference. 3. Students answer the 3 research questions or other constructed response questions. Students should also refer to their answers when writing their full informational piece piece. 15 minute break 70 Minutes 4. Students write their full composition (informational piece). SCORING An Informational Rubric is provided. Students receive three scores: 4. Organization and Purpose 5. Evidence and Elaboration 6. Conventions 4 Overcoming Challenges This classroom pre-activity follows the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium general design of contextual elements, resources, learning goals, key terms and purpose [http://oaksportal.org/resources/] The content within each of these was written by Sandy Maines The Classroom Activity introduces students to the context of a performance task, so they are not disadvantaged in demonstrating the skills the task intends to assess. Contextual elements include: 1. an understanding of the setting or situation in which the task is placed 2. potentially unfamiliar concepts that are associated with the scenario 3. key terms or vocabulary students will need to understand in order to meaningfully engage with and complete the performance task The Classroom Activity is also intended to generate student interest in further exploration of the key idea(s). The Classroom Activity should be easy to implement with clear instructions. Please read through the entire Classroom Activity before beginning the activity with students to ensure any classroom preparation can be completed in advance. Throughout the activity, it is permissible to pause and ask students if they have any questions. Resources needed: Rosa Parks Review (individual, pairs, groups, or teacher copy) - Ancillary Materials https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKTg_INHgpc (Nick Vujicic) Venn Diagram (enough for pairs, groups, or teacher) - Ancillary Materials Paper and pencil for each student Learning Goals: Students will: compare and contrast two people who have overcome challenges recognize characteristics of people who have overcome challenges Students will understand the key terms: Note: Definitions are provided here for the convenience of facilitators. Students are expected to understand these key terms in the context of the task, not memorize the definitions .

characteristic - a special quality or trait that makes a person, thing, or group different from others overcome-to successfully deal with something difficult challenge - a difficult task or problem oppression - to treat in a cruel or unfair way perseverance - the quality that allows someone to continue trying to do something even though it is difficult motivation - a force or influence that causes someone to do something resilient - the ability to become strong, healthy, or successful again after something bad happens Purpose: The facilitators goal is to help students understand common characteristics of people who have overcome incredible challenges. Divide students into pairs or groups *Facilitators can decide whether they want to display ancillary materials using an overhead projector or computer/Smartboard, or whether they want to produce them as a handout for students. Title Overcoming Challenges Facilitator says: Today, we will get ready for the Overcoming Challenges Performance Task. We are going to look at two people who have overcome incredible challenges to accomplish a goal. One is Rosa Parks, who we read about last month. The other is a man who has overcome a disability. Both had different motivations to overcome a challenge but share some common characteristics. Lets review Rosa Parks. [A Rosa Parks review is included as a supplement if students are having difficulty recalling information from the Interim Assessment.] Discussion question: What do you remember about Rosa Parks? Share information about Rosa Parks with your partner/group. [Give students 2 or 3 minutes to discuss prior knowledge of Rosa Parks. Then have each pair/group share something about Rosa and the bus.] Possible student responses (unscripted) Rosa couldnt ride at the front of the bus She wouldnt give up her seat Rosa was arrested African-Americans didnt ride the bus for a year Facilitator says: Now we are going to look at Nick Vujicic. He is a man who has also overcome significant challenges. As you watch the video, think about how he is like Rosa and how he is different. Later we will be filling out a Venn diagram to compare the two people. [Show video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKTg_INHgpc (Nick Vujicic). Provide paper for students to take notes if they want.] Facilitator says: Nick has overcome a lot of challenges. What did you notice in the video? Talk with your partner/group [Allow pairs/groups 1 - 2 minutes to talk about the video. Then have each pair/group share something about the video.] Possible student responses (unscripted) He has a disability He plays soccer He can do things I can He doesnt give up He is funny Title Overcoming Challenges Facilitator says: Lets look at how Rosa and Nick are alike and how they are different. Discussion question: What do they have the same? What is different about their circumstances? Facilitator says: Talk with your partner/group and be prepared to share your answers to these questions. [Allow students 2 - 3 minutes to discuss possible answers to the questions. Be prepared to help the class to define the vocabulary terms and others which may come up during the discussion. Have Venn diagram page ready to use as you have decided. This can be individual, pairs, groups, teacher only, or any combination you determine is best for your class. Call on students/groups and fill in Venn diagram with their answers.] Possible student responses (unscripted) Nick is disabled and Rosa wasnt They both were successful Rosa had a hard time because of the color of her skin (oppression) They both were successful in the end They lived at different times Facilitator says: Now lets look at the what helped them be successful. Discussion question: What character traits helped both of them be successful? Facilitator says: Discuss with your partner/group and be prepared to share with the class. [Give students 2-3 minutes to discuss then call on pairs/groups to share. Guide to list characteristics of people who persist in adversity.] [Write characteristics on chart paper, whiteboard, or chalkboard.] Possible student responses (unscripted)

Wanting to do things others did (motivation) Didnt give up (perseverance) Continued after bad things happened (resilient) Note: Make sure students arrive at the common understanding that: People who overcome incredible challenges share common character traits. [Say and write common understanding on chart paper, whiteboard, or chalkboard.] Facilitator says: In your performance task, you will be learning more about people who faced a challenge and how they overcame it. The group work you did today should help prepare you for the research and writing you will be doing in the performance task. Note: Facilitator should collect student notes from this activity. Rosa Parks Review Sandy Maines Rosa Parks lived during a time of segregation This meant things were different for white people and black people. They had different schools, churches, stores, elevators and drinking fountains. Buses marked the seats for whites in the front and coloreds in the back. If the seats for whites were full, coloreds would have to give up their seats. Sometimes she would have to stand if the colored seats were full even if there were seats empty in the front. December 1, 1955, Rosa decided to fight the oppression of blacks and refused to give up her seat on the bus for a white man. She was arrested. She was charged with breaking the law and fined $10. She refused to pay and appealed her case to a higher court. That same night, African-American leaders met and decided to boycott city buses. This meant African-Americans would not ride the buses. Many didnt have cars and either walked to work or carpooled with those who did own cars. This deprived the bus companies of money. After 381 days, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the segregation laws in Alabama were unconstitutional. Just because laws were changed, Rosas life was not easier. She received many threats and feared for her life. Many of the civil rights leaders houses were bombed. In 1957 Rosa and her husband moved to Detroit, Michigan. Order at HSD Print Shop http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ Order at HSD Print Shop WebSubmissionForms.aspx http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ WebSubmissionForms.aspx Directions The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform instructional decision making. It is not the intent of these assessments to have students guess and check answers for the sake of finishing an assessment. All students should move toward taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies. If students are not reading at grade level and cant read the text, please read the stories to the students and ask the questions. Allow students to read the parts of the text that they can. Please note the level of differentiation a student needed. About this Assessment This assessment includes: Selected-Response, Constructed-Response, and a Performance Task. Types of SBAC Constructed Response Rubrics in this Assessment http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=774846 Reading 2 Point Short Response 2-3 Point Extended Response Writing 4 Point Full Composition Rubric (Performance Task) 2-3 Point Brief Write (1-2 Paragraphs) Rubric 2-3 Point Write to Revise Rubrics as Needed Research 2 Point Rubrics Measuring Research Skill Use Quarter 3 Performance Task The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC. Please take 2 days to complete performance tasks. Part 1

Classroom Activity if Desired/Needed Read two paired passages. Take notes while reading (note-taking). Answer SR and CR research questions about sources Components of Part 1 Note-Taking: Students take notes as they read passages to gather information about their sources. Students are allowed to use their notes to later write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be taught as structured lessons throughout the school year in grades K 6. A teachers note-taking form with directions and a notetaking form for your students to use for this assessment is provided, or you may use whatever formats youve had past success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking page in this document before the actual assessment if you choose to use it. Research: In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed response questions written to measure a students ability to use research skills needed to complete a performance task. These CR questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than reading response rubrics. Part 2 Class Activity Plan your essay (brainstorming -pre-writing). Write, Revise and Edit (W.5) Writing a Full Composition or Speech Components of Part 2 Planning Students review notes and sources and plan their composition. Write, Revise and Edit Students draft, write, revise and edit their writing. Word processing tools should be available for spell check (but no grammar check). Full Written Informational Composition introduction (narrator and/or setting and characters) organization (event sequence) development (narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, description reflection, and multiple plot lines) transitions (to sequence events) conclusion Conventions of standard English. There are NO Technology-enhanced Items/Tasks (TE) Note: It is highly recommended that students have experiences with the following types of tasks from various on-line instructional practice sites, as they are not on the HSD Elementary Assessments: reordering text, selecting and changing text, selecting text, and selecting from drop-down menu Pre-Assessment and Learning Progressions The pre-assessments are unique. They measure progress toward a standard. Unlike the Common Formative Assessments which measure standard mastery, the pre-assessments are more like a base-line picture of a students strengths and gaps, measuring skills and concepts students need along the way, in order to achieve standard mastery. END of Beg. of QTR QTR Example of a Learning Progression for RL.2.1

Pre-Assessments Measure Adjustment Points (in purple) CFA RL.2.1 grade-level standard assessment. After the pre-assessment is given, Learning Progressions provide informal formative assessment below and near grade-level tasks throughout each quarter. Throughout DOK 1 - Ka Recall who, what, where, when, why and how about a story read and discussed in class. DOK - Kc Use and define Standard Academic Language: who, what, where, when, why, and how; ask, answer, questions, key details DOK 1 - Cd Connect the terms who to characters; where and when to setting; what and how to sequence of events. DOK 1 - Cf Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why and how questions about key details in a text. the QTR DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Student understands that key details help tell who, what, where, when, why and how. DOK 2 - Ck Uses key details to identify who, what, where, when, why and how about a story not read in class. DOK 2 -Cl Finds information using key details to

answer specific questions about a new story. Standard Mastery RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text So what about a post-assessment? There is not a standardized post-assessment. The true measure of how students are doing along the way, is assessed in the classroom during instruction and classroom formative assessment. For this reason The CFAs are not called post-assessments. The CFAs measure the end goal, or standard mastery. However, without the pre-assessments, how will we know what our instruction should focus on throughout each quarter? Learning Progressions: are the predicted set of skills needed to be able to complete the required task demand of each standard. The learning progressions were aligned to Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix. The pre-assessments measure student proficiency indicated on the boxes in purple (adjustment points). These points are tasks that allow us to adjust instruction based on performance. For instance, if a student has difficulty on the first purple adjustment point (DOK-1, Cf) the teacher will need to go back to the tasks prior to DOK-1 Cf and scaffold instruction to close the gap, continually moving forward to the end of the learning progression. There is a Reading Learning Progression checklist for each standard in each grade that can be used to monitor progress. It is available at: http://sresource.homestead.com/Grade-2.html Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 10 Quarter Three Reading Literature Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Kc Understands and uses Academic Standard Language accurately: determine, words, phrases, text, figurative, metaphors, similes and language. DOK 1 - Ce Selects correct figurative language, (metaphors or similes) when meaning is made clearly evident in the text. DOK 1 - APg Determines the L.5.5b meaning of Recognize and figurative explain the language using meaning of common Greek common and Latin affixes idioms, L.5.5a Interpret figurative and roots when adages, and language, including appropriate proverbs. similes and metaphors, in (L.5.4b). context. DOK 2 - APn Use context clues and details within text passages in

order to determine the meaning of words and phrases. (L.5.4a). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - ANq Identify examples of literary devices (metaphors and similes) within a text. DOK 3 - ANA Interpret the meaning of literary devices (metaphors and similes) as they are used within a text. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Standard RL5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. Not Assessed DOK 1 - Ka Recall basic details or facts about the use of meaning, tone or beauty in a text (read and discussed in class). DOK 1 - Kc Define and Understand the meaning of the Standard Academic Language: tone, beauty/effectiveness, visual and multimedia features (such as features presented in graphic novels, multimedia presentations of fiction, folktale, myth or poem). DOK 1 - Ka Recall or locate basic information in stories of the same genre regarding events and specific details (read and discussed in class). DOK 1 - Cf Answer who, what, when,

where or how questions about meaning, tone or beauty in a text (read and discussed in class). DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Understands that visual/multime dia elements contribute to the meaning and tone of the piece. DOK 1 - Kc Understands and uses Standard Academic Language terms: compare and contrast, genre, mysteries, adventures, approaches, similar theme and topic. DOK 2 - Cl Locate examples of visual or multimedia elements that contribute meaning, tone or beauty to a specific text. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 1 - Cd Identify similarities of characters, setting, and event sequence in stories of the same genre. DOK 2 - APn Obtain information from visual or multimedia features that specifically lends an interpretation to the meaning, tone or beauty of a text. DOK 1 - Cf Answers basic questions about how stories with similar themes or

topics (read and discussed in class) are introduced and conclude. DOK 1 - ANo Identifies what specific visual or multimedia elements represent (meaning, beauty, tone, etc...). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development: Understands that different genre can approach themes and topics differently (mysteries approach the plot early, adventures approach exciting risks early on). DOK 2 - ANp Categorizes the identified visual or multimedia features represented in a novel, presentation, folktale, myth or poem (possible graphic). DOK 3 - EVC Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for how the categorized visual or multimedia elements add to the meaning, tone, and beauty of a text CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Ci Summarize events in stories of the same genre (introduction, development and conclusion). Discuss how each story has a similar approach to a topic or theme based on the genre type. Standard RL5.7 Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute

to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, and poem). DOK 2 - Ck Make generalizations about how to recognize stories of the same genre (What story elements do you see in most mysteries? Adventures?) Not Assessed DOK 2 ANt Categorize Distinguish (list on a between graphic) genres by approaches to identifying themes and characteris topics noted tics. in stories of the same genre. DOK 2 - ANp DOK 3 - ANz Compare and contrast theme and topic approaches within the same genre. Use a graphic organizer to note similarities and differences (Venn). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 3 - EVE Share results of comparing and contrasting how different genres approach a theme or topic. Verify the reasonableness of the results during discussion or presentation. DOK 3 - SYH Synthesize information within one text about how it approaches a theme or topic. What influence did genre play? SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 4 - CL DOK 4 - SYU

Standard Develop (write) the generalized results of how specific genres approach a theme or topic. Apply this generalization to new texts (not read or discussed in class). Does the generalization apply to all? Compare and contrast multiple stories of the same genre using evidence gathered, generalizations, any graphics used, etc Conclude with a statement or section about approaches to themes and topics. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE RL5.9 Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics. Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 11 Quarter Three Reading Informational Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Locate domainspecific words and phrases studied or discussed in a text (basic recall of location). DOK 1 - Ce Understands and uses Academic Standard Language accurately: determine, general, academic, domain, specific, words, phrases, relevant. DOK 1 - Ce Select words and phrases when meaning or definition is clearly evident. L.5.6 Acquire and use accurately gradeappropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases DOK 1 - APg L.5.4b Use L.5.5c Use the common, graderelationship between

appropriate Greek particular words and Latin affixes (e.g., synonyms, and roots as clues antonyms, to the meaning of a homographs) to word (e.g., better understand photograph, each of the words. photosynthesis). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - APn L.5.4a Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. SELECTED RESPONSE Standard RI5.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domainspecific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area. Not Assessed DOK 1 - Ka Recall basic facts about particular points in a text (read and discussed in class). DOK 1 - Kc Understands and using Standard Academic Language accurately: reasons, evidence, support and particular points. DOK 1 - Cf Answer basic questions about particular points (important statements, beliefs, etc...an author makes) from a text read and discussed in class. DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development: Understands that authors

must support what they say with reasons and evidence. DOK 2 - Cl Locates a reason for a statement made by an author found explicitly in the text (continue with evidence). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - ANs Within a text, identify a reason or evidence that supports a particular point (keep simple to practice) and explain why it supports the point. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 3 - Cu Explain the connection between a list of particular points and each points supporting reason or evidence (use categorized lists or graphic organizers). DOK 3 - APx In a text not read or discussed, connect particular points to their identifying reasons or evidence to demonstrate understanding of the value of source support. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE DOK 4 CK Recall basic Understand Answer Concept Locate Make lists or Using a provided A student Student facts about and use specific who, Developm specific categories prompt about a provides explains a topic or Standard what, when, ent: examples of (graphs) of topic, student an why topic event from Academic where or

Student information similar determines what explanatio concepts several Language how understand from several information is relevant or not n of how are texts (read accurately: questions s that to texts on the found in to the prompt ideas were interrelat and Integrate, about the obtain a same topic several texts using several selected ed across discussed topic, same topic complete following a about the sources (planning, for several in class). knowledgeabl or event idea of a teachers same topic. graphic relevance texts y and topic from several topic they prompt. SELECTED organizers). in a justifying specific texts read need to RESPONSE SELECTED graphic their vocabulary and integrate RESPONSE organizer selections related to the discussed in informatio about a of subject area. class. n from specific relevant several topic/pro informati sources. mpt on about a topic. DOK 1 - Ka DOK 1 - Kc DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ch DOK 2 - Cl DOK 2 - ANp

DOK 2 - ANs DOK 3 - Cu Standard RI5.8 Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s). DOK 4 SYU Standard Gather and RI5.9 Integrate organize topic information specific from several information from texts on the multiple texts for same topic in a purpose (essay order to write or or speech) to speak about the speak subject knowledgeably knowledgeably about a topic. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE DOK 4 - ANP Not Assessed 12 Grade 5 Research Notes Teacher Guide R E- read S SOMETHING NEW E A R EXPLAIN MORE AGAIN and AGAIN RELEVANT OR NOT? C H HAVE EVIDENCE CONCLUDE

What problems or questions does the author state about the main idea? students attention to re-read and selectthe a paragraph Write one new problem or question the author brings toInstruct the readers about main Instruct students to re-read and select aor paragraph or section of the text with problems questions topic. or section of the text with problems or questions about the main topic. about the main topic. Ask, Does the section or paragraph you chose _____________________________________________________________________________ Ask,state Does the section oror paragraph chose a new question problem you about the main state a new question or problem about the idea? This is a key detail that may helpmain solve the _____________________________________________________________________________ idea? This is key detail may help solve the problem oraanswer the that question (be sure students problem or answer the question can identify the main topic). (be sure students can identify the main topic). Key Details Have students write ONE brief sentence about a

Have students write ONE briefthe sentence about ato the new problem or question author brings What key details from the passage explain more about the problem or about question? new problem or question thethe author readers attention mainbrings idea. to the readers attention about the the maintext idea.when possible. Write two key details that provide an answer or a solution. Use Quotes from 1 1 Key Detail (has an answer or solution) Ask students to look for key details that explain ________________________________________________________________________ Askmore students tothe lookproblem for key or details that explain about question. Remember students will need more about the problem or question. Remember willform need to have astudents note-taking Explain Key details about the main idea can help ________________________________________________________________________ to for have a note-taking each passage. form Explain Key detailsto about the main

idea can to help us find answers a question or solution a for each passage. us find answers to a question a key problem. Instruct studentsortosolution write 2to brief problem. students to write brief key details Instruct that provide an answer or2solution. details that provide an answer or solution. Key Detail (has an answer or solution) 2 2 _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Again and Again What words, phrases or ideas does the author use again Instruct and again? Write them students to look at thehere. again and again Instruct students to look at the again and again words or phrases, ask Do you see some of the Think about why the author uses them again and again. Have students re-read the paragraph or section Have students thewrite paragraph they wrote re-read about and wordsor orsection ideas they

theysee wrote about and write words Again and Again, in the box.or ideas they see Again and Again, in the box. Explain, When authors use the same words, Explain, When authors the same words, phrases or ideas Againuse and Again ask yourself phrases or ideas Again and Again ask yourself why? It means something is important. why? It means something is important. 3 3 words or and phrases, Do or you see in some again againask words ideas the of keythe details again and again words or ideas in the key details about problems and solutions? Can the words about problems and solutions? Can the words help you write one conclusion sentence

that helpsummarizes you write one sentence the conclusion problem and solutionthat (or the summarizes and solution (or the question the andproblem answer)? question and answer)? Summarizing is a big part of writing conclusions. Summarizing is a big part of writing conclusions. It is an extremely important strategy for students It isto anlearn extremely important strategy for in order to use research skillsstudents effectively. to learn in order to use research skills effectively. Differentiation: 4 4 Students whothat need more pages the print as many as needed. Students would benefit from enrichment can continue on with more sections or Write one conclusion sentence tells most about thewhonew contribution (key idea). Differentiation: paragraphs. Students who need more direct instruction teach each part as a mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately: Students who need more pages print as many as needed. Students who would benefit from enrichment can continue on with more sections or Main Topic Use some of the again paragraphs. and again or direct ideas in your summary. Studentswords who need more instruction teach each part as a mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately: Problem/solution question/answer

Main Topic Key Details ____________________________________________________________________________ Problem/solution question/answer Again and Again Key Details Conclusions - Summarizing Again and Again ELL Students may need each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words. Conclusions - Summarizing ELL Students may need each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words. _____________________________________________________________________________ RE Grade 5 Research Notes S SOMETHING NEW E EXPLAIN MORE A AGAIN & AGAIN R RELEVANT OR NOT? C CONCLUDE H HAVE EVIDENCE Name_______________ Passage______________ Main Idea________________ What problems or questions does the author state about the main idea? Write one new problem or question the author brings to the readers attention about the main idea. ________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Key Details What key details from the section or paragraph explain more about the problem or question? Write two key details that provide an answer or a solution. Use quotes from the text when possible. Key Detail (has an answer or solution) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Key Detail (has an answer or solution) _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Again and Again What words, phrases or ideas does the author use again and again? Write them here. Think about why the author uses them again and again. Write one conclusion sentence that tells the most about the new key idea and the answer and solution key details. Use some of the again and again words or ideas in your summary. ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Determining Grade Level Text Grade level text is determined by using a combination of both the CCSS new

quantitative ranges and qualitative measures. Example: If the grade equivalent for a text is 6.8 and has a lexile of 970, quantitative data shows that placement should be between grades 4 and 8. Common Core Band Flesch-Kincaid The Lexile Framework 2nd - 3rd 1.98 - 5.34 420 - 820 4th - 5rd 4.51 - 7.73 740 - 1010 6th 8th 6.51 - 10.34 925 - 1185 9th 10th 8.32 - 12.12 10.50 - 1335 11th - CCR 10.34 - 14.20 11.85 - 1385 Four qualitative measures can be looked at from the lower grade band of grade 4 to the higher grade band of grade 8 to determine a grade level readability. Rate your text from easiest to most difficult between bands. 4 Qualitative Factors Beginning of lower (band) grade End of lower (band) grade Beginning of higher (band) to mid End of higher (band) grade Purpose/Meaning Structure Language Clarity Language Overall Placement The combination of the quantitative ranges and qualitative measures for this particular text shows that grade 6 would be the best readability level for this text. To see more details about each of the qualitative measures please go to slide 6 of: http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf Not suited to band Grades 3 - 8: Generic 4-Point Narrative Writing Rubric

Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization Score Statement of Purpose/Focus CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: 3rd-W.3.3a-b 4th-W.4.3a-b 5th-W.5.3a-b 6th-W.6.3a, b, d The narrative, real or imagined, is clearly focused and maintained throughout: effectively establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of Exemplary view* (E) Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Organization CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: 3rd-W.3.3c-d 4th-W.4.3c-d 5th-W.5.3c-d 6th-W.6.3c, e Elaboration of Evidence Language and Vocabulary CCSS and Report Card Alignment Research to Build and Present Knowledge: 3rd-W.3.7-8 4th-W.4.7-9 5th-W.5.7-9 6th-W.6.3d & W.6.7-9 CCSS and Report Card Alignment Conventions & Vocab. Acquisition: 3rd-L.3.1b-i, L.3.3a & L.3.6 4th-L.4.1, L.4.3a, & L.4.6 5th-L.5.1b-e, L.5.3a & L.5.6 6th-L.6.1, L.6.3 & L.6.6.1 Conventions CCSS and Report Card Alignment Conventions: 3rd-L.3.2 4th-L.4.2, L.4.3b 5th-L.5.2 6th-L.6.2 & L.6.3 The narrative, real or imagined, has an effective plot helping create unity and completeness: effective, consistent use of a variety of transitional strategies logical sequence of events from beginning to end effective opening and closure for audience and purpose The narrative, real or imagined,

provides thorough and effective elaboration using details, dialogue, and description: effective use of a variety of narrative techniques that advance the story or illustrate the experience The narrative, real or imagined, clearly and effectively expresses experiences or events: effective use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language clearly advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a strong command of conventions: few, if any, errors in usage and sentence formation effective and consistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling The narrative, real or imagined, has an evident plot helping create a sense of unity and completeness, though there may be minor flaws and some ideas may be loosely connected: adequate use of a variety of transitional strategies adequate sequence of events from beginning to end adequate opening and closure for audience and purpose The narrative, real or imagined, provides adequate elaboration using details, dialogue, and description: adequate use of a variety of narrative techniques that generally advance the story or illustrate the experience The narrative, real or imagined, adequately expresses experiences or events: adequate use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language generally advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates an adequate command of conventions: some errors in usage and sentence formation but no systematic pattern of errors is displayed adequate use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling

The narrative, real or imagined, is somewhat maintained and may have a minor drift in focus: inconsistently establishes a setting, narrator and/or Developing characters, and point of view (NM) The narrative, real or imagined, has an inconsistent plot, and flaws are evident: inconsistent use of basic transitional strategies with little variety uneven sequence of events from beginning to end opening and closure, if present, are weak weak connection among ideas The narrative, real or imagined, provides uneven, cursory elaboration using partial and uneven details, dialogue, and description: narrative techniques, if present, are uneven and inconsistent The narrative, real or imagined, unevenly expresses experiences or events: partial or weak use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language that may not advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a partial command of conventions: frequent errors in usage may obscure meaning inconsistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling The narrative, real or imagined, may be maintained but may provide little or no focus: may be very brief may have a major drift focus may be confusing or ambiguous The narrative, real or imagined, has little or no discernible plot: few or no transitional strategies are evident frequent extraneous ideas may intrude The narrative, real or imagined, provides minimal elaboration using little or no details, dialogue, and description: use of narrative techniques is minimal, absent, in error, or irrelevant

The narrative, real or imagined, expression of ideas is vague, lacks clarity, or is confusing: uses limited language may have little sense of purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a lack of command of conventions: errors are frequent and severe and meaning is often obscured 4 3 Proficient (M) The narrative, real or imagined, is adequately focused and generally maintained throughout: adequately establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of view* 2 1 Merging (NY) 0 A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to [fill in with key language from the intended target]. Working Drafts of ELA rubrics for assessing CCSS writing standards --- (2010) Karin Hess, National Center for Assessment [[email protected] Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond ELP 4th 5th Grade Band Standards Organized by Modality Receptive modalities*: Ways in which students receive communications from others (e.g., listening, reading, viewing). Instruction and assessment of receptive modalities focus on students communication of their understanding of the meaning of communications from others. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing 8 determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text 3 speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics 4

construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence 7 adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing 2 5 participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems By the end of an English language proficiency level, an ELL in grades 4-5 can . . . 1 express an opinion about a familiar topic. construct gradeappropriate oral and written claims and Collaborative support themuse Interactive modalities*: with reasoning ofProductive receptive and productive modalities as and evidence. students (S & engage W) in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions (Phillips, 2008, p. 3). 4 9 - create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text Speaking & Writing 10 - make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate speech and writing which students communicate to others (e.g., speaking, writing, and drawing). Instruction and assessment of productive modalities focus on students communication of their own understanding or interpretation. An ELL can construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing Listening & reading Productive modalities*: Ways in

Standard 1 2 3 construct a simple claim about a familiar topic, and give a reason to support the claim. construct a claim about familiar topics, introducing the topic and providing a few reasons or facts to support the claim. 6 4 construct a claim about a variety of topics: introduce the topic, provide several reasons or facts to support the claim, and provide a concluding statement. 5 construct a claim about a variety of topics: introduce the topic, provide logically ordered reasons or facts to support the claim, and provide a concluding statement. analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing This performance task is based on writing. As an option if youd like to monitor growth for ELP as a second goal, teachers can choose to assess ELP standard 4 because it aligns with this specific performance task. Your students full composition can be analyzed to identify English language proficiency levels. It is evident that students will be navigating through the modalities to get to the end product. However, it is important to keep in mind what the full opinion writing performance task is assessing and how deeply the student understands class content and language. The ELP growth goal is to provide the just-right scaffolds for students to demonstrate their understanding in order for them to move from one proficiency level to the next. Oregon ELP Standards Aligned with Performance Task, 2014; Arcema Tovar Narrative Writing Pre-Assessment Student and Class Scoring: Scoring Key: Total # Correct 1 = Emerging 0-4 2 = Developing 3 = Proficient 4 = Exemplary School Year: Grade: Teachers Name: 5-7 School:

8 - 10 11 - 12 Student Name: Focus and Organization Score Elaboration and Conventions Evidence Score Student Total Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 10 0 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 16 0 17 0 18

0 19 0 20 0 21 0 22 0 23 0 24 0 25 0 26 0 27 0 28 0 29 0 30 0 31 0 32 0 33 0 34 0 35 0 ELP Score A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a

student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2 Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information. Question #7 RL.5.7 Prompt: How did the illustrations in the story, Underground Railroad, contribute to the understanding of the message in the story? Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information that supports what it was like to gain freedom on the Underground Railroad. The student should point out that both the picture of the Big Dipper and the picture of the map helped the reader to see what the author is talking about. The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate information about how the picture and map can show how hard it was to travel on the Underground Railroad. The student should state that these illustrations helped to show how difficult the trip would have been; the map showing how far they went by foot, and the picture showing how little they had to look at in a night sky. Student Language Response Example 2 The student locates and selects information to support that the map contributing to the message of freedom from slavery and the student interprets and integrates information about how hard the trip on the Underground Railroad would have been: In the story written by Anna Freedom, the map shows the route she talked about taking on the Underground Railroad. It shows how long it was and what states she went through. It helps you to see how long and difficult the trip would have been to get to freedom, especially because they were walking so far. Also, the picture of the Big Dipper showed what it looked like and helped me to see what Anna would have been looking at in the sky to help her go North. It would have been difficult to just follow stars and to do it at night. 1 The student locates and selects some information to support that the map contributing to the message of freedom from slavery and the student interprets and integrates information about how hard the trip on the Underground Railroad would have been: The map shows the trip on the Underground Railroad. The picture shows the Big Dipper that they looked at to show how to go north (no indication of how hard the trip was). 0 The student does not give enough evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information. There was a map and a picture of stars. Toward RL.5.7 DOK 3 - EVC Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for how the categorized visual or multimedia elements add to the meaning, tone, and beauty of a text. 19 Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 3 evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion Question #8 RL.5.9 Prompt: What do both Harriet Tubman and Underground Railroad tell us about slavery? Cite evidence from both to support your answer. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information. Relevant information would include evidence that supports that slavery is wrong. The student should point out that in the poem the author says that Harriet didnt come into this world to be a slave, suggesting that it is wrong. She also says that Harriet isnt going to take no stuff referring to what she was going through with slavery was wrong. In the other piece it says that working in the fields is back-breaking work, that she was a house slave, and that she was being soldall things that indicate she didnt have freedom. A concluding statement should include that slavery is wrong. Student Language Response Example Student is able to distinguish relevant information: 2

Both stories told me that slavery is not right. In the story it said that working in the fields is back breaking work and that she was a slave and was going to be sold. I know thats not right, that people shouldnt be owned by someone else. In the poem it said that Harriet didnt come into this world to be a slave. I know that she would say that because no one wants to be a slave. So both stories are about how slavery isnt right. 1 Student is able to distinguish some relevant information: Both stories are about slavery and how it is wrong. In the poem it says that Harriet didnt come into this world to be a slave because she knows its wrong. 0 Student is not able to distinguish relevant information: These stories are about Harriet Tubman. Toward RL.5.9 DOK 4 - SYU Compare and contrast multiple stories of the same genre using evidence gathered, generalizations, any graphics used, etc Conclude with a statement or section about approaches to themes and topic. 20 DOK-3 Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RI.5.8 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric 15. Question #15 (prompt): How was Bookers success in later years, most likely influenced by his early life? Support your answer with details from both the early and later years of his life. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence should connect important points that Booker T. Washingtons later success was influenced by his early life. Specific identifications (supporting details) would be any details that infer how Bookers early life may have contributed to the success he had. Because this is a DOK-3 there are many possible answers that are acceptable if they are supported with evidence from the text. Examples of how his early life may have shaped his success in later years could include (1) being born a slave he saw firsthand how difficult life was for slaves so in later years, he wanted to help others in the same situation (In 1881, the Alabama law approved $2,000 for the Tuskegee College), (2) Booker wanted to attend school but couldnt so in later years, he appreciated education more, (Booker T. Washington graduated from Hampton in 1875 with high marks), (3) he worked hard from a young age so in later years hard work was expected, (Later, General Armstrong offered Washington a job teaching at Hampton) (4) he understood what it was to be poor, (5) he was supported by a coal miners wife to go to school an hour each day so Booker knew that education was possible, although difficult. Full Support could include (other details) any details or examples specifically from Bookers Early Life if they support specific examples of his later success. The student gives a proficient response by stating important points about how Bookers success in later years was influenced by his early life. 3 2 1 0 Booker T. Washington had a very difficult early life. He was born a slave and slaves had no rights. He especially wanted to go to school but it was against the law. But he never gave up on his dream of going to school. He got up each morning at 4 a.m. to practice reading! If he had given up, Booker would not have been successful in starting a college later in life. In 1881 Tuskegee College was opened and he was in charge! From the time he was a little boy Booker had to work hard. He helped his stepfather in a salt factory beginning at the age of 9. He worked hard all his life. He worked as a houseboy in 1866 and worked many jobs to support himself. He worked as a janitor in college. I believe if Booker was not a hard worker he would not have kept on trying. In later life he was a teacher and head of Tuskegee College which all takes a lot of work! The student gives a partial response by stating important points about how Bookers success in later years was influenced by his early life but with few examples from the text. Booker was a success in life. He went and became a teacher even though it was hard to learn because he wasnt allowed to go to school as a little boy. He was also in charge of a college. He worked hard to learn to read and write which is why he could be successful. The student gives a minimal response by stating important points about how Bookers success in later years was influenced by his early life with no examples from the text. Booker T. Washington was very smart. He was a teacher. He worked really hard. The student does not address the prompt specifically.

Long ago slaves were not allowed to go to school or read or write. That is really sad. Toward RI.5.8 DOK 3 - APx In a text not read or discussed, connect particular points to their identifying reasons or evidence to demonstrate understanding of the value of source support. 21 Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 4 Ability to cite evidence to support opinions and/or ideas Question #16 RI.5.9 Prompt: What contributions did both Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington make to better the lives of others? How were their contributions similar and different? Use evidence from both texts. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support the opinion/idea of what contributions both Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington made to education and how they were similar or different. Students should state definite opinions/ideas of contributions of both men and how they were similar or different. Sufficient evidence to support the stated opinion/idea for Sequoyah could include that (1) he started a system of writing, (2) he thought it important for the Cherokee people to communicate on paper and have their own writing system and (3) Cherokees were able to read and write because of him. Sufficient evidence to support the stated opinion/idea for Booker T. Washington could include that (1) he was able to better lives because he himself learned to read and write, (2) he attended college and became a teacher and (3) many freed slaves were able to attend a college that he was in charge of. Similarities and differences between the two men can be any specific statements supported by the text. Student Language Response Example Student states the contributions of both Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington to better the lives of others with evidence cited from the text. 2 1 0 Sequoyah felt it was very important that the Cherokee people could communicate on paper and have their own system of writing. He created a Cherokee alphabet and it took him 12 years. He is the only person known to have made an entire alphabet all alone. Because of him, Cherokees were able to read and write in their own language. Booker T. Washington wanted to read and write but was not allowed to learn to because he was a slave. He found ways to learn anyway. He studied hard and after the Civil War he got a scholarship to a college. Soon he was a teacher and then a college head. Because of him, newly freed slaves were able to attend college. Both men made peoples lives better because they helped others get an education but in different ways. Sequoyah invented an alphabet and Booker made it possible for freed slaves to go to school. Student minimally or vaguely states the contributions of both Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington to better the lives of others with minimal or vague evidence cited from the text. Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington were men who made a difference in other peoples lives. They both helped others be able to read and write better. The student does not answer the prompt. Im glad there were people like Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington because they helped others. Toward RI.5.9 DOK 4 - ANP Gather and organize topic specific information from multiple texts for a purpose (essay or speech) to speak knowledgeably about a topic. 22 Note: Brief Writes should take no longer than 10 minutes. Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension . Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Brief Write Constructed Response Answer Key Organization: Conclusion and Temporal Words

W.5.3c Target: 1a Write a Brief Text, W.3c Temporal Words, Writing Target 1a Question #17 Prompt: In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. Brief Write, Organization, W.5.3c, writing a conclusion temporal words Target 1a The New Books A farmer decided to send his four sons to school. He gave each son a book for school. The next day, he asked his sons, What have each of you done with your new books at school? The oldest son told him, I studied my book hard so I can continue to do well at school! The second son told his father, I sold my book so I could buy more. The third son told his father, I gave my book away to a boy who had none. The youngest son told his father, I shared my book with another student at school. The father told his sons that one of them used his new book in the best way. Teacher /Rubric Language Response Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: The student response should provide a conclusion (1-2 paragraphs) that logically follows and supports the preceding information about the events and experiences of the characters in the story. The conclusion should have a statement that explains what happened after the four sons shared with their father, what they did with their new books. Students should use temporal words to signify event changes from beginning to end. Student Language Response Example The response provides a transition from the body of the story to the conclusion and provides a satisfying ending to the narrative that follows logically from the events or experiences in the story. 2 1 0 All the children were waiting for the farmer to say something about the books. They waited and waited. They started to get a little nervous about what their dad was thinking. Finally the farmer said, One of you used his book in the best way. And it was you! He pointed to the oldest son. You studied hard in your book so that you could continue to do well in school. That was so smart! You were thinking about the future. Im really proud of you. He gave his oldest son a big hug. Now next year we can all learn from you! Everyone hugged the oldest son, and then they all decided to study more from their own books so that they too would have good futures. The response provides a limited transition from the body of the story to the conclusion and provides a general or partial ending to the narrative that may provide some closure and/or somewhat logically from the events or experiences in the story. The children looked at their father. I wonder what hes thinking, they all thought. Then the father looked at the children and said, So you all used your books in the best way you could. So next time lets see how you do at school and maybe we can get ice cream afterwards. The response does not complete the narrative in a logical way. The youngest son jumped up and down and wanted to go play. He was only six years old and didnt really care about the book much yet. Thats why he decided to go play on the swings in his yard. 23 W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. W.5.3.a Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. W.5.3.b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. W.5.3.c Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. W.5.3.d Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. W.5.3.e Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events Narrative Full Composition Performance Task Score 4 Student Sample SBAC Rubric Grades 3 - 8 Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization score 4 Student score explained Statement of Purpose/Focus

The student establishes a setting and character. The focus is clearly maintained throughout the story. The narrators point of view is clearly expressed. Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Organization Elaboration of Evidence Language and Vocabulary The student has a beginning, middle and an ending in sequential order that moves forward with transitional words and in a logical order of events. The opening and conclusion create unity. The student elaborates with details from passages about overcoming a challenge. The student uses narrative techniques of dialogue and description to advance the story. The students voice is knowledgeable about the information. The student uses sensory language (vicious, mercilessly, elated, slinking) . Concrete and expressive vocabulary makes the story effective ( sauntered right out in the open, mocking, and expressive dialogue). Conventions The student has few or no errors in grammar, word usage, or mechanics as appropriate to grade. Thomas the Little Cat Thomas was a little cat that wanted to be a big cat. He always had to hide and run from the bigger cats who continually bullied him on the block. The worst offender was a giant yellow tabby named Cynthia! She was a monster, with the longest claws Thomas had ever seen. Once Cynthia had purposely hid behind the red rose bushes in front of his house and waited for him to walk past. When he did she jumped on top of him and clawed him mercilessly. He was battered from head to toe and if a cat could have a black eye then Thomas probably had one! Most of the other cats on the block werent as bad as Cynthia but they followed her and did whatever she did just to impress her. All but one old grayed whiskered cat that is, Mr. Harvey. Mr. Harvey may not have been fast and mean anymore like he was in his younger days, but he made up for it by being wise. When Mr. Harvey learned what Thomas had to endure day after day he decided to put a stop to the bullying. He had a plan. He waited until everything was quiet on the block one afternoon and then approached Thomas house. He quietly meowed for Thomas, being extra careful not to scare him off. When Thomas saw it was Mr. Harvey he was happy. He felt like he at least had one friend on the block. Mr. Harvey and Thomas talked for a long time about the plan to stop the bullying. Thomas was elated. Surely it would work, but they wouldnt find out until the next day. Bright and early the next morning they were ready to put their plan into action. Thomas walked out in the broad daylight and instead of slinking around the bushes and hiding behind trees as he would normally do, he sauntered right out into the open where Cynthia and all of the other cats could easily spot him. Sure enough Cynthia and all of the other cats started to approach Thomas. Cynthia was of course, in the lead. Thomas almost chickened out because she

looked so ferocious, but he didnt! He stuck to the plan. Immediately Cynthia started mocking him saying, Youd better run little Thomas. Im much bigger and stronger than you! The other cats laughed. But instead of running, Thomas just sat and opened his mouth as wide as he could possibly open it. Whats the matter Thomas, she said, Are you hoping a bird will fly into your mouth for breakfast? At that all of the cats roared in delight. Then, suddenly a huge sound came from Thomas mouth. Instead of a meow it sounded like a lions roar. The trees almost seemed to shake. The sound was so loud all of the other cats covered their ears with their paws. Again, Thomas opened his mouth and out came a loud, scary roar but this time not only was it loud, but birds flew out of the trees in fright. The other cats ran away but Cynthia was so frightened she couldnt move. Her ears were down and her tail was tucked. Her fur stood straight up! Thomas walked stealthily toward her. And step by step he spoke to her saying, Each time your friends continue to bully me I will be forced to let out my powerful roar. Cynthia shook her head, stepped backward, turned and ran as fast as she could. After that Cynthia and the other cats never bothered her again, Mr. Harvey became Thomas hero and best friend, and Thomas could go wherever he pleased without worrying about being bullied. His reputation grew on the block and beyond! The small cat with the big roar was famous. So what was the plan? How had Mr. Harvey and Thomas pulled it off? Well, that remains a secret, even to this day, but if you go and look inside Mr. Harveys garage near his house youll find an old but workable chainsaw. 24 Grade 5, Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key Question 1 What details in the passage, The Underground Railroad, help you to know what the word, ferried, means? Toward RL.5.4 DOK-2 APn C Question 2 Why did the author use the term, back-breaking in her piece, The Underground Railroad? Toward RL.5.4 DOK-3 ANA B Question 3 How does the map in the story, The Underground Railroad, contribute to the meaning in the story? Toward RL.5.7 DOK-2 Cl D Question 4 How does the illustration in The Underground Railroad, show the meaning of the road to freedom? Toward RL.5.7 DOK-1 ANo A Question 5 What do Harriet Tubman and Underground Railroad both emphasize about slavery? Toward RL.5.9 DOK-3 ANz C Question 6 How did the poem about Harriet Tubman show us her feelings about slavery? Toward B RL.5.9 DOK-3 SYH Question 7 Literary Constructed Response Toward RL.5.7 DOK3 - EVC 2 Question 8 Literary Constructed Response 2 Toward RL.5.9 DOK 4 - SYU Question 9 What is a synonym for the word approach as used in the text Sequoyah? Toward RI.5.4 DOK-1 APg Question 10 In this sentence from Sequoyah, They often used these talking leaves, as some Native Americans called them, to communicate, why did the Cherokee most likely use the phrase talking leaves? Toward RI.5.4 DOK-2 APn Question 11 In the passage Booker T. Washington what is the most likely reason the author states, Born on April 5, 1856, Bookers life had little promise early on. Toward RI.5.8 DOK-2 Cl A B

C Question 12 Why did Sequoyah decide to try a different approach to his written language? Toward RI.5.8 DOK-2 ANs A Question 13 How are the achievements of Sequoyah and Booker T. Washingtons lives most similar? D Question 14 What two reasons are most relevant in explaining why both Sequoyah and Booker were successful? Toward RI.5.9 DOK-2 ANs (both must be correct) A,C Question 15 Informational Text Constructed Response Toward RI.5.8 DOK3 - APx 3 Question 16 Informational Text Constructed Response Toward RI.5.9 DOK4 - ANP 2 Write and Revise Question 17 Brief Write In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. 2 Question 18 The writer wants to add dialogue to the paragraph. Which line of dialogue would best fit after D the last sentence? W.5.3b Revise a Text Question 19 Choose the two words that best replace both of the underlined words. L.5.3a, L.5.6 Language Use Question 20 Choose the correct way to edit the grammar usage errors. L.5.1a B C 25 Grade 5 5 th th Student Copy Pre-Assessment Quarter 3 Name ____________________ 26 Read the Directions. Part 1 You will read several literary and informational text sources about people who have overcome incredible challenges in their lives . As you read, take notes on these sources. Then you will answer several research questions about these sources. These will help you plan to write a fictional narrative story. You are going to write a narrative story about a character who overcomes an incredible challenge. Use details from the texts you have read to add to your narrative. Steps you will be following: In order to help you plan and write your narrative you will do all of the following: 1. Read the literary and informational texts. 2. Answer several questions about the sources. 3. Plan your story. Directions for beginning:

You will now read several literary and informational texts. Take notes because you may want to refer to your notes when you later plan your narrative story. You can refer to any of the sources as often as you like. Questions Answer the questions. Your answers to these questions will be scored. Also, they will help you think about the sources youve read, which should help you plan your narrative story. 27 Grade Equivalent 5.2 Lexile Measure 970L Mean Sentence Length 16.67 Mean Log Word Frequency 3.73 Word Count 145 Harriet Tubman by Eloise Greenfield Harriet Tubman didn't take no stuff Wasn't scared of nothing neither. Didn't come in this world to be no slave And wasn't going to stay one either. "Farewell!" she sang to her friends one night She was mighty sad to leave 'em. But she ran away that dark, hot night Ran looking for her freedom. She ran to the woods and she ran through the woods With the slave catcher right behind her. And she kept on going till she got to the North Where those mean men couldn't find her. Nineteen times she went back South To get three hundred others. She ran for her freedom nineteen times To save black sisters and brothers. Harriet Tubman didn't take no stuff Wasn't scared of nothing neither Didn't come in this world to be no slave And didn't stay one either And didn't stay one either. 28 Grade Equivalent 4.8 Lexile Measure 770L Mean Sentence Length 12.47 Mean Log Word Frequency 3.70 Word Count 561 Underground Railroad as told by Anna K. Freedom A Fictional Personal Narrative by Lane Calhoun My name is Anna K. Roberts and I was born a slave in 1816 in Maryland. From the time I was six years old I worked as a house slave. I was lucky because I didnt have to work the fields like most other slaves. Working the fields is back breaking work. I was owned by the Roberts family and lived on their plantation. When I was 14, I learned that I would be sold to another family. My mother had already been sold and I was alone in the world. I decided to run away. There were rumors that a woman people called Moses helped slaves who wanted to run away. She was once a slave too but found a way to escape. A friend, a white woman, helped me contact this Moses. I was really afraid of being caught. That is how I learned about the Underground Railroad and the woman people called Moses. Her real name was Harriet Tubman. Harriet had escaped through the Underground Railroad and now she helped other slaves escape too. She helped so many slaves escape, that slave owners were offering a $40,000 reward for her capture. I thought Harriet must be really smart and clever. One late night, a woman came to me and led me north. I didnt even know her name. She brought me some clothes and a bag of dried bread and beef. She said Moses had sent her! The woman and I walked 10 miles to a station, where I met some other slaves. Then she left and all of us slaves were told to wait there for a message. The station was a place to stay. I learned the Underground Railroad didnt really mean a railroad. Underground meant hidden and railroad meant along the way. So we were hidden along the way by folks wanting to help us be free. We had to walk 10 to 20 miles between some stations and always moved north. To move north, I learned from other enslaved people how to follow Polaris, the North Star and the Big Dippers two stars on the pouring edge, which always point straight ahead to the north. 29

Underground Railroad continued. We were given directions between each station of where to go next. We followed the Big Dipper night after night. We followed the North Star through Delaware and into Pennsylvania. Finally when we made it to Philadelphia. The Quakers there helped me to find work. The Quakers were a group of people who believed slavery was morally wrong. The first thing I did was change my name to Anna K. Freedom! I was no longer a Roberts slave! I worked hard and earned extra money to help the Underground Railroad. I had friends at the plantation that I knew would like to escape but mostly I wanted my mother to come to Philadelphia. After two years, I would return on the bright night sky to Maryland along with Harriet Tubman. We ferried three friends and my mother out of slavery. I was never happier. My mother and I cried and hugged and thanked God over and over. Harriet Moses Tubman was not only my hero, but we became friends. She made over 19 trips to the South and helped over 300 slaves to freedom. Harriets Route to Freedom Bucktown, Maryland to Philadelphia Pennsylvania Approximately 130 miles 30 1. What details in the passage, The Underground Railroad, help you to know what the word, ferried, means? A. I worked hard and earned extra money. B. I would return on the bright night sky. C. my mother out of slavery D. I was never happier. Toward RL.5.4 DOK 2 - APn Use context clues and details within text passages in order to determine the meaning of words and phrases. (L.5.4a). 2. Why did the author use the term, back-breaking in her piece, The Underground Railroad? A. To point out that field work is done with your back only. B. To show how hard the field work was on a slave. C. To say that you could break your back when you worked. D. To prove how strong someone must be when working in a field. Toward RL.5.4 DOK 3 - ANA Interpret the meaning of literary devices (metaphors and similes) as they are used within a text. 31 3. How does the map in the story, The Underground Railroad, contribute to the meaning in the story? A. It shows what the country looked like at that time. B. It shows which states the slaves had to travel through. C. It shows the picture of what the Big Dipper looks like. D. It shows how far they traveled by foot to gain freedom. Toward RL.5.7 DOK 2 - Cl Locate examples of visual or multimedia elements that contribute meaning, tone or beauty to a specific text. 4. How does the illustration in The Underground Railroad, show the meaning of the road to freedom? A.It shows that the stars were a guide to freedom for slaves. B.It shows what slaves saw at night while they were in the fields. C.It shows what the slaves thought about at night. D.It shows the road that the slaves took to get freedom. Toward RL.5.7 DOK 1 - ANo Identifies what specific visual or multimedia elements represent (meaning, beauty, tone, etc...)

32 5. What do Harriet Tubman and Underground Railroad both emphasize about slavery? A. They both wrote about Harriet Tubman and what she did. B. They both talked about slavery and the Underground Railroad. C. They both showed that slavery meant a lack of freedom. D. They both are piece about American history Toward RL.5.9 DOK 3 - ANz Compare and contrast theme and topic approaches within the same genre. Use a graphic organizer to note similarities and differences. 6. How did the poem Harriet Tubman show us her feelings about slavery? A.It showed us that she wasnt scared of anything. B.It said that being a slave meant not having her freedom. C.It said that she was sad to leave her friends. D.It showed us that she kept on going until she got to the north. Toward RL.5.9 DOK 3 - SYH Synthesize information within one text about how it approaches a theme or topic. What influence did genre play 33 7. How did the illustrations in the story, Underground Railroad, contribute to the understanding of the message in the story? Toward RL.5.7 DOK 3 - EVC Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for how the categorized visual or multimedia elements add to the meaning, tone, and beauty of a text. 8. What do both Harriet Tubman and Underground Railroad tell us about slavery? Cite evidence from both to support your answer. Toward RL.5.9 DOK 4 - SYU Compare and contrast multiple stories of the same genre using evidence gathered, generalizations, any graphics used, etc Conclude with a statement or section about approaches to themes and topic. 34 Grade Equivalent 7.6 Lexile Measure 790L Mean Sentence Length 12.54 Mean Log Word Frequency 3.66 Word Count 301 Sequoyah Elizabeth Yeo Imagine a man who cannot read or write. Now imagine that same man creating a brand new alphabet from scratch. It sounds next to impossible, doesnt it? Yet that is exactly what one man dida man named Sequoyah. Born around 1770 in Tennessee, Sequoyah was a Cherokee. Like other Native Americans of that time, he could neither read nor write. He couldnt help noticing, though, how white people wrote to one another on sheets of paper. They often used these talking leaves, as some Native Americans called them, to communicate. Back then, the Cherokee had no way to write down words in their own language. Sequoyah believed it was important for the Cherokee to have a system of writing. So, in 1809, he set out to create an alphabet that the Cherokee could use to do just that. Sequoyah started by drawing pictures, with each one representing a different word or idea. He soon realized that writing sentences using pictures would be much too difficult. There were too many words. No one would ever be able to remember that many pictures. Sequoyah decided to try a different approach. He began to develop symbols to stand for the sounds, or syllables that made up words. Twelve years later, he completed a system of writing with

86 different symbols. Each one stood for a different syllable in the Cherokee language. The symbols could easily be put together to form words. Soon thousands of Cherokee were able to read and write in their own language. His single-handed achievement marks the only known instance of an individual creating a totally new system of writing. Today, his legacy lives on in the hearts and minds of his beloved Cherokee people. In 1925 the General Council of the Cherokee Nation voted to make the alphabet official. 35 Grade Equivalent 7.1 Lexile Measure 860L Mean Sentence Length 13.60 Mean Log Word Frequency 3.63 Word Count 544 Booker T. Washington Elizabeth Yeo Born in Virginia in the mid-to-late 1850s, Booker T. Washington put himself through school and became a teacher. In 1881, he founded Tuskegee College in order to train African Americans in farming. Early Life Born on April 5, 1856, Bookers life had little promise early on. In Virginia, as in most states before the Civil War, the child of a slave became a slave. Booker's mother worked as a cook. Booker never knew his father. Booker and his mother lived in a one-room log cabin with a large fireplace. At an early age, Booker carried sacks of grain to the mill. It was hard work for a small boy. They lived near a school house. Looking inside, he saw children his age sitting at desks and reading books. He wanted to go to school but it was against the law to teach slaves to read and write. After the Civil War, his mother moved to West Virginia. There she married Washington Ferguson. The family was very poor. 9-year old Booker went to work in a salt factory with his stepfather instead of going to school. Booker's mother knew he wanted to learn and got him a book to read. He learned the alphabet and how to read and write basic words. Because he was still working, he got up nearly every morning at 4 a.m. to practice reading. At about this time, Booker took the first name of his stepfather as his last name, Washington. In 1866, Booker T. Washington got a job as a houseboy working in a coal miners home. The coal miners wife learned that Booker was smart and honest. She wanted to help him. Over the two years he worked for her, she allowed him to go to school for an hour a day during the winter months. 36 Booker T. Washington continued Education After the Civil War and the freedom of slaves, Bookers dream of an education could come true. In 1872, Booker T. Washington left home and walked 500 miles to Hampton Agricultural College in Virginia. Along the way he took odd jobs to support himself. He was able to attend the school and took a job as a janitor to help pay the cost. The school's founder soon offered him a scholarship. The founder felt it was important to support newly freed slaves by helping them get an education. He soon became Washington's mentor. Legacy Booker T. Washington graduated from Hampton in 1875 with high marks. In 1879, he was asked to speak at Hampton's graduation. Later, General Armstrong offered Washington a job teaching at Hampton. In 1881, the Alabama law approved $2,000 for the Tuskegee College. General Armstrong was asked to hire a white man to run the school, but instead he hired Booker T. Washington. Classes were first held in an old church, while Washington traveled all over the countryside telling about the school and raising money. Under Booker T. Washington's leadership, Tuskegee became a leading school in the country. In 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to the White House. He was the first African American to be asked to the White House. Booker T. Washington remained the head of Tuskegee Institute until his death on November 14, 1915, at the age of 59. 37 9. Read the sentence from the passage Sequoyah. Sequoyah decided to try a different approach. What is a synonym for the word approach as used in the text Sequoyah? A. strategy

B. alphabet C. advance D. syllable Toward RI.5.4 DOK 1 - APg L.5.5c Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. 10. In this sentence from Sequoyah, They often used these talking leaves, as some Native Americans called them, to communicate, why did the Cherokee most likely use the phrase talking leaves? A. Cherokee Indians noticed that white men wrote on leaves. B. The Cherokee Indians compared the paper that white men used to communicated and write on, to leaves. C. Talking leaves was another way to say communicate. D. When white men ran out of paper, they wrote on leaves. Toward RI.5.4 DOK 2 - APn L.5.4a Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. 38 11. In the passage Booker T. Washington what is the most likely reason the author states, Born on April 5, 1856, Bookers life had little promise early on. A. Bookers family was very poor. B. Bookers mother worked as a cook. C. Bookers mother was a slave and a child of a slave was also a slave. D. Booker had to go to work at an early age rather than go to school. Toward RI.5.8 DOK 2 - Cl Locates a reason for a statement made by an author found explicitly in the text (continue with evidence). 12. Why did Sequoyah decide to try a different approach to his written language? A. He realized that writing sentences using pictures would be too difficult. B. Each picture represented a different word C. He realized people would not like the pictures. D. Like other Native Americans of that time, he could neither read nor write. Toward RI.5.8 DOK 2 - ANs Within a text, identify a reason or evidence that supports a particular point and explain why it supports the point. 39 13. How are the achievements of Sequoyah and Booker T. Washingtons lives most similar? A. They both enjoyed working at a young age. B. Both were able to learn to read and write.. C. Sequoia and Booker were both unable to attend school. D. Both men were able to help people with the same experiences theyd had. Toward RI.5.9 DOK 2 - ANp Make lists or categories (graphs) of similar information found in several texts about the same topic.

14. What two reasons are most relevant in explaining why both Sequoyah and Booker were successful? A. Although they both had obstacles, they both persevered. B. Both went to school and studied other alphabet systems. C. Both continually worked on learning and doing more. D. They both created their own alphabet system. Toward RI.5.9 DOK 2 - ANs Using a provided prompt about a topic, student determines what is relevant or not to the prompt using several sources . 40 15. How was Bookers success in later years, most likely influenced by his early life? Support your answer with details from both the early and later years of his life. Toward RI.5.8 DOK 3 - APx In a text not read or discussed, connect particular points to their identifying reasons or evidence to demonstrate understanding of the value of source support. 16. What contributions did both Sequoyah and Booker T. Washington make to better the lives of others? How were their contributions similar and different? Use evidence from both texts. Toward RI.5.9 DOK 4 - ANP Gather and organize topic specific information from multiple texts for a purpose (essay or speech) to speak knowledgeably about a topic. 41 17. In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. Brief Write, Organization, W.5.3c, writing a conclusion temporal words Target 1a The New Books A farmer decided to send his four sons to school. He gave each son a book for school. The next day, he asked his sons what they had done with their new books at school. The oldest son told him that he studied his book hard so he could continue to do well at school. The second son told his father that he sold his book so he could buy more. The third son told his father that he gave his book away to a boy who had none. The youngest son told his father that he shared his book with another student at school that day. The father told his sons that one of them used his new book in the best way. 42 18. A student is revising this draft. Read the draft of the paragraph and then complete the question that follows. Revise a Text, W.5.3b Dialogue Elaboration, Writing Target 1b He had been running mile after mile, always following the North Star and the Big Dipper. How much longer until he got to a station where it would be safe and he could rest? He heard a loud snap coming from behind him. He ducked down low behind a tree and saw it was just a lone raccoon. The writer wants to add dialogue to the paragraph. Which line of dialogue would best fit after the last sentence? A He screamed at the top of his lungs, SCAT! B. He said nothing. C. Then the raccoon looked at him and said, Go Away! D. Oh, its just you little fellow, he whispered. I thought someone was chasing me for sure! 43 19. A student wants to rewrite a sentence from the passage Sequoyah so it is more appropriate for her class. Language and Vocabulary, L.5.3a Audience, Writing Target 8

Twelve years later, he completed a system of writing with 86 different symbols. Choose the two words that could best replace both of the underlined words. \ A. manner, rules ` B. method, signs C. routine, parts D. different, items 20. Read the sentence and the question that follows. Edit and Clarify L.5.1a, speech order Correlative Conjunctions Target 9 With this bad weather, Harriets plan will _______be delayed _______ be canceled. Choose the correct way to edit the grammar usage errors. A.neither nor B.both or C.either or D.both and 44 Part 2 Your assignment: These will help you plan to write a fictional narrative story. You are going to write a narrative story about a character who overcomes an incredible challenge. Use details from the texts you have read to add to your narrative. You will: 1. Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 2. Write Revise and Edit your first draft (your teacher will give you paper). 3. Write a final draft of your narrative story. You will be scored by. Purpose how well you maintain your focus, and establish a setting, narrator and or characters Organization how well the events logically flow from beginning to end using effective transitions and how well you stay on topic throughout the story Elaboration: of evidence how well you elaborate with details, dialogue, and description to advance the story or illustrate the experience Elaboration: of language and vocabulary how well you effectively express experiences or events using sensory, concrete, and figurative language that is appropriate for your purpose

Conventions how well you follow the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc.) 45 46 47 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions! 48 Student Scoring Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was not correct. Literary Text 1 I can use context clues and details in a text to determine the meaning of words and phrases RL.5.4 2 I know meaning of literary devices (metaphors and similes) as they are used within a text. RL.5.4 3 I can find examples of illustrations or other media that contribute meaning, tone or beauty to a text. RL.5.7 4 I can explain what different parts of illustrations or multimedia show meaning, beauty or tone. RL.5.7 5 I can compare and contrast themes and topics of the same genre. RL.5.9 6 I can synthesize information within one text about how it approaches a theme or topic. RL.5.9 7 I can cite evidence and give a logical argument of how multimedia elements can add to the meaning, tone, and beauty of a text RL.5.7 2 1 0 8 I can compare and contrast stories of the same genre with evidence, and make a conclusion of how the stories approach similar themes and topics. RL.5.9 2 1 0 2 1 0

2 1 0 Informational Text 9 I can use synonyms, antonyms and homographs to better understand each of the words. RI.5.4 10 I can use the context clues of cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text to find the meaning of a word or phrase. RI.5.4 11 12 I can locate a reason for a statement made by an author. RI.5.8 13 I can categorize similar information found in several texts about the same topic. RI.5.9 14 I can determine what is relevant or not about a topic using several sources, in order to answer a prompt. RI.5.9 15 I can connect particular points to their reasons or evidence. RI.5.8 16 I can gather and organize topic specific information from texts for a purpose (essay or speech). RI.5.9 I can identify a reason or evidence that supports a particular point the author makes. RI.5.8 3 Writing 17 In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. W.5.3c 18 The writer wants to add dialogue to the paragraph. Which line of dialogue would best fit after the last sentence? W.5.3b Revise a Text 19 Choose the two words that best replace both of the underlined words. L.5.3, L.5.6 Language Use 20 Choose the correct way to edit the grammar usage errors. L.5.1a 2 1 0 49

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