What is ? Objectives of the Activity Determine

What is ? Objectives of the Activity  Determine

What is ? Objectives of the Activity Determine a definition of art Decide what is art and what is not art Define terms related to the viewing of

art Examine two images critically Individually answer the following questions:

What is art? What are different types of art? How does art influence society? Why is art important? What sort of messages do art have?

Now in your small groups discuss these questions:

What is art? What are different types of art? How does art influence society? Why is art important? What sort of messages do art have? Image #1

Is this art? Why or why not? What elements does it have or not have? Image #2 Is this art? Why or why not? What

elements does it have or not have? Image #3 Is this art? Why or why not? What elements does it have or not have?

Image #4 Is this art? Why or why not? What elements does it have or not have? Image #5

Is this art? Why or why not? What elements does it have or not have? Image #6 Is this art? Why or why not? What elements

does it have or not have? What is the Purpose of Art? religious ritual From the prehistoric cave paintings of France, to the Sistine Chapel, art has served religion. For centuries the Church was the primary patron of artists. In traditional societies even today, the primary

purpose of art is religious or ceremonial. commemoration of an important event or person The event may be of major historical importance, such as the coronation of Josephine by Napoleon as recorded by the artist David, or it may be important only to the participants, like the image of a wedding or a baptism.

propaganda or social commentary Propaganda images are attempts to persuade us toward particular viewpoints or actions promoted by public or private institutions such as political parties, lobbyists, governments, or religious groups. The propaganda purpose may be one we approve of, such as World War II efforts to get women behind the war effort, as epitomized in Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter. It might also be

a purpose we disapprove of. In either case, the power of visual images has frequently been used to persuade masses of people to accept beliefs, take action, or follow leaders. The artist as social commentator may simply make us more aware of the human condition as he/she perceives it, without suggesting particular action. recording of visual data telling the "truth" about what we see. After the

Renaissance, artists became preoccupied with new ways of capturing reality such as the use of linear perspective, and the realism possible through the use of oil painting technique. In time, artists like Courbet and Cezanne (and many who followed them) began in various ways to challenge the basic idea of what it is for an image to be true and real.

creating beauty Yet the idea of beauty, like that of truth, has been challenged in the modern era. At one time, the artist was expected to portray perfection-- lofty and noble ideals of beauty. Yet as society became more industrialized and democratic, many thoughtful people began to broaden their notions of what could be beautiful. For example, Rembrandt could celebrate the tactile quality of paint and color in his picture of a side of

beef, and Courbet and Millet could see beauty in the life of ordinary peasants. storytelling his was a common device of religious art of the Middle ages where sequences of panels were used to tell stories from the Scriptures or lives of saints. It is also the great gift of Norman Rockwell, who had the ability to tell powerful and

subtle stories about ordinary people and events, in just one picture. A picture is truly worth a thousand words. intense emotion The expressive power of art can be seen in literal ways in the capturing of facial expression and body language. Certain religious art, and the works of expressionists such as Munch are charged with powerful emotions. Picasso, in works such

as Guernica (also an example of powerful social commentary and storytelling) is able to communicate intense emotions. This is accomplished variously by use of dramatic or exaggerated color, light, form, and/or other elements. What are some of the elements seen

here? Looking @ Art Light Perspective Movement Color Form

Proportion Symbolism Giovanni Arnolfini and His Bride Jan Van Eyck, 1434

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