Smart Snacks in School Click Arrow to Begin

Smart Snacks in School Click Arrow to Begin H Shortcut Buttons Home Button Found on each page. Selecting the Home button returns you to this Practice Topic Topic 1 page. Practice Practice Practice Topic 2 2 Topic 1

Questions Questions 1 1 Questions Questions 2 2 Practice Practice Questions Questions 3 3 Topic Topic 3 3 Practice Practice Questions Questions 4

4 Topic Topic 4 4 Topic Topic 5 5 These buttons link to major sections of this course. Double-Click to navigate. 1 Smart Put Course Snacks Name

in School Here School Nutrition Toolbox NAVIGATION Navigation is pretty basic. Back Button, Forward Button, and Home Button. Back Button Found on each page. Selecting the Back button returns you to the previous page. Forward Button Found on each page. Selecting the Forward button advances you to the next page. Home Button Found on each page. Selecting the Home button returns you to the very beginning page. 2

H TOPIC 1 | APPLICABILITY School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Participants will: 1. Describe the situations under which Smart Snacks regulations do and do not apply. 2. Define school campus and school day. Introduction The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (2010) provided the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) the authority to establish minimum nutrition standards for all foods and beverages sold outside of the federal child nutrition programs in schools. The standards are practical

and science-based, and are intended to provide healthy school nutrition environments. This module describes the standards for foods and beverages, discusses their applicability, explains how fundraisers are to be handled, describes recordkeeping requirements, addresses frequently-asked questions, and provides links to valuable resources Smart Snacks standards apply to foods and beverages that are sold to students: Outside of the school meal programs; On the school campus; and At any time during the school day. Continued on next slide. 3 H TOPIC 1 | APPLICABILITY Smart Snacks standards apply to foods and beverages that are sold to students: (continued) Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School

Here School Nutrition Toolbox Examples of where the standards apply would include a la carte items in the cafeteria and snack bars, school stores, vending machines, and other venues that are located on the school campus and are available to students during the school day. The school campus includes all areas of the property under the jurisdiction of the school that are accessible to students during the school day. The school day is defined as the period from midnight the night before to 30 minutes after the end of the official school day. Non-sold foods that are offered to students at school are not required to meet the Smart Snack standards, but schools have the option of making this a requirement. Examples of non-sold, offered foods include classroom rewards and foods brought to school for birthday and holiday celebrations. Schools must include nutrition standards for any non-sold foods offered to their students in their local school wellness policies. Smart Snacks standards represent minimum standards. Local Education Agencies may establish additional standards. Practice Questions | #1. 4

H Practice Questions 1 | Applicability Click on the either the Smart Snack Standards Apply or Smart Snacks Standards Do Not Apply button to answer the following three (3) questions. Lets Get Started H 1 Practice Questions | Applicability A vending machine located outside of the lunchroom that is turned on after the last lunch period until 3:30 PM, which is the end of the normal school day. Smart Snack Standards Apply Smart Snacks Standards Apply Do Not Apply

2 Practice Questions | Applicability A concession stand is open in the lobby outside of the school gym during an evening basketball game, which starts two hours after the end of the normal school day. Smart Snack Standards Apply Smart Snacks Standards Apply Do Not Apply 3 Practice Questions | Applicability As part of a classroom lesson about a foreign country, a teacher brings in and offers to students samples of food items that are commonly consumed in the country being studied. Smart Snack Standards Apply Smart Snacks Standards Apply Do Not Apply

How did I do? Continue on to Topic 2. H Participants will: 1. List the general standards and the nutrient standards for foods. 2. State the requirements for meeting general standards and nutrient standards. 3. Use Nutrition Facts labels to conduct calculations to determine if food items meet nutrient standards. 4. State exemptions to nutrient standards for foods. 5. Define entre as it relates to Smart Snacks. 6. Identify a resource for determining if food items meet nutrient standards. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here

TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS There are both general and nutrient standards for foods. Food items must meet ONE of the four general standards. They must meet all nutrient standards. General Standards (must meet one) 1. Be a whole grain-rich product. Grain products must contain 50% or more whole grains by weight or have whole grains as the first ingredient. 2. Contain one of the other major food groups (i.e. fruit, vegetable, dairy product, or protein food) as the first ingredient. 3. Be a combination food with at least cup fruit and/or vegetable. Combination food means an item that contains two or more components representing two or more of the recommended food groups. 4. Contain 10% of the Daily Value of one nutrient of public health concern (only through June 30, 2016). Nutrients include calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and dietary fiber. Continued on next slide. 10 H

TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS Food must meet nutrient standards for: Total Fat Saturated Fat Trans Fat Sodium Calories Total Sugar School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Nutrient Standards (must meet all six)

Accompaniments must be included in the nutrient profile as part of the item served. Examples include salad dressing on salad, butter or jelly on toast, cream cheese on bagels, and garnishes. No preportioning is required. An average portion should be determined. TOTAL FAT 35% of total calories per item as packaged/served Exemptions: Reduced-fat cheese and part-skim mozzarella; Nuts, seeds, and nut/seed butters; Dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fat; and Seafood with no added fat. Continued on next slide. 11 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS TOTAL FAT (continued) There are two acceptable methods for calculating Total Fat. If either method results in 35% (DO NOT ROUND), then the item meets the total fat standard. School Nutrition Toolbox

Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Total Fat Calculations METHOD #1 Example Continued on next slide. 12 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS TOTAL FAT (continued)

There are two acceptable methods for calculating Total Fat. If either method results in 35% (DO NOT ROUND), then the item meets the total fat standard (continued). School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Total Fat Calculations METHOD #2 This item meets the standard for total fat because the result of the calculation using Method #2 is less than 35%. Example

13 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS <10% of total calories per item as packaged/served Exemptions: Reduced-fat cheese and part-skim mozzarella; Nuts, seeds, and nut/seed butters; and Dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fat. SATURATED FAT CALCULATION School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School

Here SATURATED FAT There is one method for calculating Saturated Fat. DO NOT ROUND. Products up to 9.9% of calories from saturated fat meet the standard. The item above meets the standard for saturated fat because it contains less than 10% of calories from saturated fat. Example 14 H

TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS TRANS FAT Zero grams of trans fat per portion as packaged/served. Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here School Nutrition Toolbox Practice Questions | #2. 15 H Practice Questions 2 | Fat You will be presented with six (6) scenarios about fat. Using the label displayed on the left, answer the questions on the right.

Lets Get Started H 1 Practice Questions | Fat Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for total fat? Yes No 2 Practice Questions | Fat Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for saturated fat? Yes No

3 Practice Questions | Fat Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for trans fat? Yes No 4 Practice Questions | Fat Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for total fat? Yes No 5 Practice Questions | Fat

Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for saturated fat? Yes No 6 Practice Questions | Fat Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for trans fat? Yes No How did I do? Continue Topic 2. H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS

Snack items and side dishes as packaged/served: 230 mg sodium (until June 30, 2016) 200 mg sodium (beginning July 1, 2016) Entre items that do not meet NSLP/SBP exemptions: 480 mg sodium per item as packaged/served (NSLP/SBP exemptions will be explained later in the module.) School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here SODIUM Entre item means: A combination food of meat/meat alternate and whole grain-rich food; OR A combination food of meat/meat alternate and fruit or vegetable; OR A meat/meat alternate served alone* * For the purposes of Smart Snacks, USDA excludes some meat/meat alternates served alone from the

definition of entre because they are typically snack items. The exclusions include yogurt, low-fat or reduced fat cheese, nuts, seeds, nut or seed butters, and meat snacks. 24 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS CALORIES School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Snack items and side dishes: 200 calories per item as packaged/served Entre items that do not meet NSLP/SBP exemptions (NSLP/SBP exemptions will be explained later in

the module.): 350 calories per item as packaged/served Entre item means: A combination food of meat/meat alternate and whole grain-rich food; OR A combination food of meat/meat alternate and fruit or vegetable; OR A meat/meat alternate served alone* * For the purposes of Smart Snacks, USDA excludes some meat/meat alternates served alone from the definition of entre because they are typically snack items. The exclusions include yogurt, low-fat or reduced fat cheese, nuts, seeds, nut or seed butters, and meat snacks. 25 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS TOTAL SUGARS Exemptions include: Dried/dehydrated fruits or vegetables (with no added nutritive sweeteners); Dried fruits with nutritive sweeteners for processing and/or palatability purposes (e.g., dried cranberries, tart cherries, and blueberries) Exempt dried fruit with only nuts and/or seeds (with no added nutritive sweeteners or fat.)

School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here 35% of weight from total sugars per item as packaged/served TOTAL SUGAR CALCULATION This item meets the total sugar standard because it contains less than 35% total sugar by weight. Example Practice Questions | #3.

26 H Practice Questions 3 | Sugar You will be presented with two (2) scenarios about fat. Using the label displayed on the left, answer the questions on the right. Lets Get Started H 1 Practice Questions | Sugar Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for sugar? Yes No 2

Practice Questions | Sugar Does this product meet the Smart Snacks requirement for sugar? Yes No How did I do? Continue Topic 2. H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS Snack items and side dishes as packaged/served: 1. Fruit and Vegetable Exemption The following are exempt from all nutrient standards: Fresh, frozen, and canned fruit packed in water, 100% juice, light syrup or extra light syrup. Fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables with no added ingredients except water. Canned vegetables with small amount of sugar for processing purposes. Combinations of fresh, frozen, or canned fruits and vegetables as long as there are no other ingredients except for water.

2. NSLP/SBP Entre Exemption Items sold as entrees in the reimbursable school breakfast or lunch are exempt from all Smart Snacks standards for the day of service and the school day after service. Entre item means: A combination food of meat/meat alternate and whole grain-rich food; OR A combination food of meat/meat alternate and fruit or vegetable; OR A meat/meat alternate served alone.* For the NSLP/SBP entre exemption, School Food Authorities are permitted to determine which menu item(s) are the entre item for breakfasts and may include grain-only items. * For the purposes of Smart Snacks, USDA excludes some meat/meat alternates served alone from the definition of entre because they are typically snack items. The exclusions include yogurt, low-fat or reduced fat cheese, nuts, seeds, nut or seed butters, and meat snacks. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here BROAD EXEMPTIONS

31 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS Snack items and side dishes as packaged/served (continued): 3. Chewing Gum Exception Sugar-free chewing gum is also exempt from all Smart Snacks standards. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here BROAD EXEMPTIONS (CONTINUED)

4. Paired Exemptions Items that have been designated as exempt from one or more of the nutrient requirements individually and are packaged together without any additional ingredients are called paired exemptions. These paired items are exempt from meeting all nutrient standards except for calories and sodium. Continued on next slide. 32 H TOPIC 2: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR FOODS BROAD EXEMPTIONS (CONTINUED) Snack items and side dishes as packaged/served (continued): School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here

4. Paired Exemptions (continued) Smart Snacks Product Calculator The Alliance for a Healthier Generation has developed an on-line calculator that can be used to determine if products meet the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards. USDA has determined that the results from the calculator are accurate in assessing product compliance. Flow Chart | 1. 33 H SMART SNACKS PRODUCT CALCULATOR FLOWCHART Click on Each for Full Size School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Snacks in School Begin

Skip Flowchart End 34 H 1 1 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 35 H 2 2 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 36 H 3 3 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 37 H 4 4 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 38 H 5 5 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 39 H 6 6 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 40 H 7 7 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 41 H 8 8 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 42 H 9 9 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 43 H 10 10 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 44 H 11 11 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 45 H 12 12 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 46 H 13 13 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 47 H 14 14 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 48 H 15 15 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 49 H 16 16 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 50 H 17 17 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 51 H 18 18 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 52 H 19 19 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart 53 H 20 20 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next

Previous Skip Flowchart Continue on to Topic 3. 54 H Participants will: 1. State the types of beverages that are allowable at each grade level. 2. State the allowable container sizes for beverages. 3. Describe how to assess if a beverage is compliant or not. 4. State the calorie limits for other beverages allowable in high schools. 5. Describe how to determine if a smoothie qualifies as a food or beverage. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course

Snacks Name in School Here TOPIC 3: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR BEVERAGES Beverages for All Grades The beverages that are allowable at all grade levels are: Plain water, with or without carbonation Low fat milk, unflavored* Nonfat milk, unflavored or flavored* 100% fruit/vegetable juice** *Includes nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives, as permitted by NSLP/SBP **May include 100% juice diluted with water (with or without carbonation) and no added sweeteners. Continued on next slide. 55 H

TOPIC 3: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR BEVERAGES Beverages for All Grades (CONTINUED) School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here The allowable container sizes for beverages vary by grade level. + Some bottled waters have minerals (e.g. fluoride) added for taste. This is acceptable. However, no other additives such as natural or other flavors or sweeteners are allowed for water sold to students in elementary or middle schools. 56 H

TOPIC 3: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR BEVERAGES In high schools, some other beverages are also allowable. Calorie-free beverages: Maximum serving size 20 fluid ounces Calorie-free flavored water, with or without carbonation Other calorie-free beverages with less than 5 calories per 8 fluid ounces, or up to 10 calories per 20 fluid ounces Proportional standard: up to 0.5 calories per fluid ounce Lower Calorie Beverages: Maximum serving size 12 fluid ounces Up to 60 calories per 12 fluid ounces Up to 40 calories per 8 fluid ounces Proportional standard: up to 5 calories per fluid ounce Special attention should be paid to beverages between 12-20 fluid ounces as described in the table below. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name

in School Here Other Beverages Permitted in High Schools (grades 9-12) 57 H TOPIC 3: NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR BEVERAGES Smoothies may be sold as a food or beverage depending on the ingredients used to make the smoothies. It may qualify as an entre. To count as a food, a smoothie must include one of the main food group categories as the first ingredient (e.g. dairy product or fruit) and meet the 6 nutrient standards. if a smoothie contains a meat alternate (such as yogurt) and a fruit or vegetable, it could qualify as an entre, allowing a calorie limit of 350 calories and a sodium limit of 480 mg under Smart Snacks. An entre smoothie that is menued as part of the reimbursable meal would be exempt from all Smart Snacks standards under the NSLP/SBP entre exemption if it is sold a la carte on the day of service or the day after service in the school meal. A smoothie can also be considered a beverage if it is composed entirely of beverages that are allowable (100 percent juice, low fat or nonfat milk, and water/ice). Size limits are the same as

for other beverages: 8 fluid ounces for elementary schools, 12 fluid ounces for middle and high schools. School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Smoothies: Food or Beverage? Caffeinated Beverages In elementary and middle schools, foods and beverages must be caffeine-free, with the exception of trace amounts of naturally-occurring caffeine substances, such as in chocolate milk. In high schools there are no caffeine restrictions. Flow Chart | 2. 58

H INTERIM FINAL RULE FLOW CHART - BEVERAGES Click on Each for Full Size Skip Flowchart School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Snacks in School Begin End Smart Snacks Product Calculator The Alliance for a Healthier Generation has developed an on-line calculator that can be used to determine if products meet the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards. USDA has determined that the results from the calculator are accurate in assessing product compliance. The Smart Snacks Product Calculator can be accessed at: http://rdp.healthiergeneration.org/calc/calculator/

59 H 1 1 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

60 H 2 2 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

61 H 3 3 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

62 H 4 4 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

63 H 5 5 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

64 H 6 6 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

65 H 7 7 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

66 H 8 8 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

67 H 9 9 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

68 H 10 10 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

69 H 11 11 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

70 H 12 12 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

71 H 13 13 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

72 H 14 14 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

73 H 15 15 Smart Snacks in School School Nutrition Toolbox Flow Chart Home Next Previous Skip Flowchart

Practice Questions | #4. 74 H Practice Questions 4 | Beverages You will be presented with five (5) scenarios about fat. Using the label displayed on the left, answer the questions on the right. Lets Get Started H 1 Practice Questions | Beverages A 12 oz. bottle of water is allowable for sale at which grade level(s)? Elementary Middle High

All of the Above 2 Practice Questions | Beverages A 12 oz. bottle of low fat, unflavored milk is allowable for sale at which grade level(s)? Elementary Middle High All of the Above 3 Practice Questions | Beverages An 8 oz. bottle of low fat, flavored milk is allowable for sale at which grade level(s)? Elementary

Middle High All of the Above 4 Practice Questions | Beverages A sports drink is 12 fluid ounces and contains 50 calories. Is it allowable for sale in high schools? Yes No 5 Practice Questions | Beverages A beverage is 16 fluid ounces and contains 10 calories. Is it allowable for sale in high schools? Yes No

How did I do? Continue on to Topic 4. H TOPIC 4: FUNDRAISERS School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Participants will: 1. Define fundraiser. 2. State the regulations for fundraisers that meet the Smart Snacks standards. 3. Define exempt fundraiser.

4. State the regulations for exempt fundraisers. Fundraisers A fundraiser is an event that includes an activity in which currency/tokens/tickets, etc. are exchanged for the sale/purchase of a product in support of the school or school-related activities. Examples include: bake sales, candy bar sales, vending machines where profits are used to support a school-sponsored club or activity, such as the school band or sports team. All foods that meet the Smart Snacks standards may be sold at fundraisers on the school campus during the school day without limits on frequency or location. Smart Snacks standards do not apply to items sold during non-school hours, weekends, or off-campus fundraising events. 82 H Exempt Fundraisers The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act allows state agencies that oversee School Nutrition Programs to determine if schools will be permitted to sell foods (including beverages) as fundraisers that do not meet the Smart Snacks in Schools standards and, if permitted, establish the number and duration of each fundraiser. The Pennsylvania Department of Education has determined the following for SY 2015-16:

A maximum of five exempt fundraisers will be permitted in each elementary and middle school building per year. A maximum of ten exempt fundraisers will be permitted in each high school building per year. Each fundraiser may not exceed five consecutive school days. Schools with combined grades are permitted to hold the number of exempt fundraisers allowed for the highest grade in the building. (For example, a K-12 school may hold up to 10 exempt fundraisers/year.) Each Local Education Agency must establish a process for ensuring the number of exempt fundraisers does not exceed the maximum number allowed. No foods or beverages sold as exempt fundraisers may be sold in competition with school meals in the food service area during the meal service. See PDE-SNP-405 on PEARS Download Forms Smart Snacks in School for Q and As about fundraisers. Ideas for healthy fundraisers can be found here: http://healthymeals.nal.usda.gov/local-wellness-policyresources/wellness-policy-elements/healthy-fundraising School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School

Here TOPIC 4: FUNDRAISERS 83 H TOPIC 5: ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS School Nutrition Toolbox Smart Put Course Snacks Name in School Here Participants will: 1. Describe the recordkeeping requirements related to Smart Snacks standards. 2. Describe who is responsible for recordkeeping related to Smart Snacks standards.

3. Describe how adherence to Smart Snacks standards will be monitored. Recordkeeping Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and School Food Authorities (SFAs) are required to maintain records such as receipts, nutrition labels, and nutrient calculations or printouts from the Alliance for a Healthier Generations online Smart Snacks calculator. SFAs maintain records for competitive foods sold under the nonprofit school food service account. LEAs maintain records for all other competitive food sales, including for exempt fundraisers in each building. Monitoring and Compliance State agencies will monitor compliance with the standards through a review of LEA records as part of the state agency administrative review. At this time, if violations have occurred, technical assistance and corrective action plans will be required. 84 H School Nutrition Toolbox

Smart Snacks in School End of Course H 85

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • ATLAS B Physics Performance Update  Detector and trigger

    ATLAS B Physics Performance Update Detector and trigger

    yes yes 300 mm 4.3 cm Physics TDR 1999 missing yes Pixel disk #2, TRT C-wheels missing yes Middle pixel layer 400 mm 400 mm B-layer pixel length in z 5 cm 5 cm Radius of B-layer Initial Complete Detector...
  • ALC recruitment update - Queen Mary University of London

    ALC recruitment update - Queen Mary University of London

    Facilitate a workflow for model preparation and force field (FF) conversion of zeolite-based inorganic-organic systems via DL_FIELD for use in MD simulations via DL_POLY. Deliverables. 1. Testing of multiple-potential capabilities of DL_FIELD to improve model conversion work flows (1 month)...
  • Building Drawings - Pimpri Chinchwad Polytechnic

    Building Drawings - Pimpri Chinchwad Polytechnic

    A site plan can show: existing trees the building outline, including the roof the main dimensions of the house and site and metres drainage pipes and manholes which run from the bathroom and kitchen to the main drain under the...
  • Disability Services

    Disability Services

    Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Employment Supports. Everyone's path to employment is different. That's why there are many kinds of Ontario Disability Support Program Employment Supports. Here are some examples: help preparing for work. help finding and keeping a job....
  • Management Board  28th August 2013 Integrated Performance Report

    Management Board 28th August 2013 Integrated Performance Report

    The previous months score (June ) for the NHS Safety Thermometer has triggered as Amber having dropped below the 95% target. Following the drop, which was effected in part by changes in criteria of patients included in the data capture,...
  • Tutorial 1: Game Theory - WordPress.com

    Tutorial 1: Game Theory - WordPress.com

    Alice plays up with probability 1 if 9−6?>5−3?, that is ?<43. Note that 43 is greater than 1. That is, for any ?∈0,1, Alice's best response is to play up with probability 1. Alice will always play up with probability...
  • Building an Effective Website - GCI Church Tech

    Building an Effective Website - GCI Church Tech

    Yawn! Is it important? Absolutely. And it might actually attract some intellectual types who think that your sermons might be studies in Trinitarian theology. But at the core, it says "God is the center of everything we are and do."...
  • Lights, Camera, Action Shakespeare on Film

    Lights, Camera, Action Shakespeare on Film

    Lights, Camera, Action: Shakespeare on Film Unit of Study ... we will conduct a Socratic Circle to discuss some of the key questions identified throughout the unit This is a great time to discuss potential paper topic questions and ideas...