Safety & Workers Compensation Coordinators Meeting (You Can

Safety & Workers Compensation Coordinators Meeting (You Can

Safety & Workers Compensation Coordinators Meeting (You Can Make a Difference) 8:30 Welcoming Remarks 10:15 Break *Candy Clarke Aldridge 8:40 Opening Remarks (We are making a difference) * Ramiro Cano Previous years overview (charts and graphs) Introduction of Kim Smith (Bio) * Kim Smith Future Hopes / Directions / Things to come 10:25 Safety Updates (Making a difference) *Safety Assessment Update Dana Doan *Hurricane SeasonChad Frost *Emergency ResponseChris Trevino *Heat PrecautionsJames Garza

9:00 Guest Speaker (You can make a difference) *Introduction Kim Smith *Dawn Bergerson, OTR, CCM (Bio) Ergonomics 11:00 Presentation of Safety Awards (Those that made a difference) * Candy Clarke Aldridge / Ramiro Cano 9:30 Workers Compensation Cambridge (You are making a difference) *Introduction Kim Smith *Cambridge Sherm Caldwell (Bio) Boating Safety 11:45 Closing Remarks Safety & Workers Compensation Coordinators Meeting July 21, 2009 You can make a difference Candy Clarke Aldridge Human Resources Department

Acting Director We are making a difference Ramiro Cano Human Resources Department Assistant Director Workers Compensation Claim Cost $22,860,619 $20,194,637 We are making a difference $16,025,698 2004 2005 (-12%) 2006 (-21%) $16,950,761 $15,811,078 2007 (-1%) $14,920,731

2008 (7%) 2009 (-12%) 35% REDUCTION = $30 M Things to Come We will continue to make a difference Kim A. Smith Human Resources Department Division Manager Risk Management, Safety Health and Workers Compensation, Salary Continuation Workers Compensation Claim Management Model Continual Quality Improvement Speedy & Appropriate Return to Work Incentive Program Physical Dimension Hiring Benefits Orientation PreAccident Behavior ModificationSafety Training

Medical Network Diligent, Coordinated & Strategic claim management HR TPA Timely Benefits Delivery Safety Committee ls too Qualified Vendors 24 hr.Claim Notice Accident Continuous Injured employee Communication & Coaching Immediate and Quality Medical Care and Case Management

Guest Speaker Dawn Bergerson, OTR, CCM Injury Management Organization, Inc. Health Care Management Company Cambridge Integrated Services You are making a difference Sherm Caldwell Vice President Client Services Cambridge Integrated Services Group Inc. at 12 Months City of Houston 3rd Qtr 2008/2009 Average Incurred 07/01/2004 - 06/30/2005 Occurrence Year All Claims Medical Only Lost Time Closed Claims Medical Only Lost Time Open Claims Medical Only Lost Time $ 6,602

$ 768 $ 19,557 07/01/2005 - 06/30/2006 Occurrence Year All Claims Medical Only Lost Time Closed Claims Medical Only Lost Time Open Claims Medical Only Lost Time $ 4,941 $ 886 $ 12,173 07/01/2006 - 06/30/2007 Occurrence Year All Claims Medical Only Lost Time Closed Claims Medical Only Lost Time Open Claims Medical Only Lost Time

$ 5,576 $ 992 $ 13,330 07/01/2007 - 06/30/2008 Occurrence Year All Claims Medical Only Lost Time Closed Claims Medical Only Lost Time Open Claims Medical Only Lost Time $ 6,279 $ 669 $ 14,070 07/01/2008 - 03/31/2009 Occurrence Year All Claims Medical Only Lost Time Closed Claims Medical Only Lost Time Open Claims Medical Only Lost Time

$ $ $ $ 17,374 $ 2,068 $ 30,485 $ 13,515 $ 2,622 $ 22,922 . $ 14,468 $ 2,751 $ 25,511 . $ 17,459 $ 1,809 $ 28,105 3,812 528 9,513 . $ 10,223 $ 1,431 $ 17,752

Average Paid Claim Count Open Closed % at 24 Months Claim Count $ 6,693 $ 510 $ 19,392 $ 4,433 $ 491 $ 12,529 $ 2,474 $ 470 $ 7,305 $ 37,354 $ 3,058 $ 41,075

2,547 1,713 834 2,404 1,699 705 143 14 129 $ 3,845 $ 490 $ 9,520 $ 2,174 $ 484 $ 5,435 $ 36,539 $ 2,360 $ 37,841 2,242 1,409 833 2,133 1,405 728 109 4 105

$ 3,636 $ 413 $ 8,828 $ 2,206 $ 388 $ 5,454 $ 36,539 $ 6,670 $ 38,466 2,376 1,466 910 2,277 1,460 817 99 6 93 96% 100% 90% 4% 0% 10% .

$ 104,302 $ $ 104,302 $ 3,757 $ 410 $ 8,436 $ 2,140 $ 395 $ 4,927 $ 29,807 $ 2,458 $ 31,832 2,482 1,447 1,035 2,337 1,437 900 145 10 135 94% 99% 87% 6% 1%

13% 21 Months 2,470 386 7,098 852 374 2,911 550 425 9,847 2,454 1,692 762 1,600 1,298 302 854 394 460 $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ 1,897 374 4,615 814 353 2,036 4,149 442 7,350 2,185 1,400 785 1,475 1,071 404 710 329 381 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ 1,910 338 4,570 807 344 1,916 3,967 323 7,402 2,320 1,458 862 1,510 1,065 445 810 393 417 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,346 336 5,136 1,016 342 2,349 5,171 316 8,474 2,446 1,422 1,024 1,663 1,105 558 783 317 466 68% 78% 54% 32% 22% 46% . $ 60,717 $ 5,106

$ 64,837 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,753 259 4,348 734 250 1,964 3,877 287 6,951 1,751 1,111 640 1,183 849 334 568 262 306

68% 76% 52% 32% 24% 48% 9 Months $ 77,618 $ 5,455 $ 85,449 $ 5,125 $ 492 $ 12,962 68% 77% 51% 32% 24% 49% $ 62,869 $ 3,051 $ 65,148 $ 5,238 $ 425

$ 12,992 65% 73% 52% 35% 27% 48% at 36 Months Average Paid $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 65% 77% 40% 35% 23% 60%

Open Closed % Average Incurred . $ 74,991 $ 9,563 $ 79,212 $ 5,563 $ 428 $ 12,741 Average Incurred $ $ $ 94% 99% 85% 6% 1% 15% $ 126,814 $

5,842 $ 140,255 $ $ $ 95% 100% 87% 5% 0% 13% 6,141 512 17,732 5,221 491 13,157 $ $ $ 89,109 89,109 $ $ $

4,768 410 11,795 Average Paid $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Claim Count Open Closed % at 48 Months Average Incurred 4,944 506 14,081

3,726 496 10,735 65,795 3,945 72,667 2,548 1,715 833 2,498 1,710 788 50 5 45 $ $ $ $ 4,425 $ 491 $ 11,025 $ 3,192 $ 491 $ 8,029 $ 55,393 $

$ 55,393 2,244 1,406 838 2,191 1,406 785 53 0 53 98% 100% 94% 2% 0% 6% $ 117,168 $ $ 117,168 $ 3,898 $ 410 $ 9,521 $ 3,108 $ 410 $ 7,653

$ 51,227 $ $ 51,227 2,377 1,467 910 2,338 1,467 871 39 0 39 98% 100% 96% 2% 0% 4% 33 Months 98% 100% 95% 2% 0% 5% $ 160,055

$ 1,368 $ 164,722 $ $ $ You are making a 6,148 494 17,698 5,040 491 12,672 Average Paid $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Claim Count

Open Closed % at 57 Months Average Incurred 5,083 494 14,459 4,006 493 11,480 82,495 1,093 84,890 2,550 1,712 838 2,515 1,711 804 35 1 34 $ $

$ 6,068 494 17,456 99% 100% 96% 1% 0% 4% $ 216,524 $ $ 216,524 $ 4,530 $ 491 $ 11,306 $ 3,572 $ 491 $ 8,927 $ 77,688 $ $ 77,688 2,244 1,406

838 2,215 1,406 809 29 0 29 99% 100% 97% 1% 0% 3% 45 Months Average Paid Claim Count Open Closed % $ 5,139 $ 494

$ 14,629 $ 4,237 $ 494 $ 12,089 $ 108,821 $ $ 108,821 2,550 1,712 838 2,528 1,712 816 22 0 22 99% 100% 97% 1% 0% 3% 600 500 400 300

200 100 0 3rd Qtr 04/05 3rd Qtr 05/06 3rd Qtr 06/07 3rd Qtr 07/08 3rd Qtr 08/09 Med Only 341 311 329 307 344

Indemnity 187 159 198 249 202 Total 528 470 527 556 546 You are making a difference You are making a difference 6% 3-4 Days

6% 4% 5-6 Days 2% 2% 7-8 Days 2% 1% 9-10 days 1% 2% 11-20 Days 21-30 Days 31+ Days 2% 1% 1% 3% 0% % of 3rd Qtr Claims 08/09 % of 3rd Qtr Claims 07/08

You are making a difference You are making a difference Break 10 Minutes You can make a difference How to make a difference Dana Doan Human Resources Department Safety Supervisor SAFETY UPDATES SAFETY UPDATES How to make a difference Safety Updates Dana Doan Safety Assessments Human Resources Department AP2-2 Safety Supervisor AP2-21

How to make a difference Chad Frost HR Safety Officer HAZCOM Compliance Three Steps to Readiness 4 Three Steps to Readiness Be Prepared! Make a Plan! Be Informed! HURRICANE SEASON The hurricane season lasts from June 1 through Nov. 30. Hurricanes can cause a great deal of damage, so preparing ahead of time is important. Those of us who live in coastal communities should prepare, plan and be informed on what they will do. National Atmospheric Oceanic Administration (NOAA) has predicted 2009 to: 1. 2.

3. Be a Near-Normal Atlantic hurricane season. Others saying Below-Normal Forecasts Show: 70 percent chance of having 9-14 named storms 4-7 could become hurricanes, of which -- 1-3 may develop into major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5). Other data shows: 10 named storms. (6 hurricanes, 2 major) THREE STEP ACTION PLAN Step 1: Be Prepared! Start putting together a Emergency Supply Kit The kit should include items like Water - at least 1 gallon daily per person for 3 to 7 days Food - at least enough for 3 to 7 days non-perishable packaged or canned food/ juices foods for infants or the elderly snack foods non-electric can opener cooking tools/fuel paper plates/plastic utensils

Blankets/Pillows, etc. Clothing - seasonal/rain gear/sturdy shoes First Aid Kit/Medicines/Prescription Drugs Special Items - for babies and the elderly Toiletries/Hygiene items/Moisture wipes Flashlight/Batteries Radio - Battery operated and NOAA weather radio

Phones - Fully charged cell phone with extra batteries and a traditional (landline) telephone Cash and Credit Cards - Banks and ATMs may not be available for extended periods Toys, Books and Games Important documents (insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc.) - in a waterproof container or watertight resealable plastic bag Tools - keep a set with you during the storm Keys, Vehicle fuel tanks filled Pet care items proper identification/immunization records/medications ample supply of food and water a carrier or cage muzzle and leash TIP: You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it in your car. Be Prepared! Make a Plan! Be Informed! Step 2: Make A Plan! Create a Family Emergency Plan A. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know 1.

How you will contact one another? It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members. 2. How you will get back together? Inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, daycare and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one. 3. What you will do in case of an emergency? Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. B. Plan to Evacuate Identify ahead of time where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. Identify several places you could go in an emergency, a friend's home in another town, a motel or public shelter. If you do not have a car, plan alternate means of evacuating. If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate. Take your Emergency Supply Kit. Take your pets with you, but understand that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters. Plan how you will care for your pets in an emergency.

C. Utilize local training and information resources to get training and education regarding Hurricane Preparedness and other Disaster Preparedness topics. Be Prepared! Make a Plan! Be Informed! Step 3: Be Informed! Understand the Dangers/Familiarize yourself and your family A Hurricane Watch means a hurricane is possible in your area. Be prepared to evacuate. Monitor local radio and television news outlets or listen to NOAA Weather Radio for the latest developments. A Hurricane Warning is when a hurricane is expected in your area. If local authorities advise you to evacuate, leave immediately. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential. 1. MAJOR hurricanes = Category Three and higher 2. Categories One and Two = Extremely Dangerous and warrant your full attention. AT WORK Assess how your Department functions 1. Determine staff, materials, procedures and equipment are absolutely necessary to keep the business operating. (COOP).

2. Identify operations critical to survival and recovery. 3. Plan what you will do if your building, warehouse or shop is not accessible. Consider if you can continue work operations from a different location or from your home. Develop relationships with other Departments to use their facilities in case a disaster makes your location unusable. AT HOME LOCAL RESOURCES Cover all windows with pre-cut ply wood or hurricane shutters to protect from high winds. Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down. Keep all trees and shrubs well trimmed so they are more wind resistant. Secure your home by closing shutters, and securing outdoor objects or bringing them inside. Turn off utilities as instructed and/or turn the refrigerator thermostat to coldest setting and keep its doors closed. Turn off propane tanks. Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water. Be Prepared! Identify Local Government Emergency Plans established in your area.

Follow Instruction given by Local Officials Federal and National Resources Federal Emergency Management Agency NOAA Watch American Red Cross U.S. Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control Make a Plan! Be Informed! How to make a difference Chris Trevino HR Safety Officer RESPONDING TO AN EMERGENCY HR CENTRAL SAFETY The Safety Office is responsible for the oversight of accident prevention within city departments. (713) 306-2548 Important phone numbers Third Party Administrator (TPA) (866) 678-1748 Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 713-964-9906

HR Central Safety BEFORE AN EMERGENCY HAPPENS Know your departments emergency procedures Know where the emergency equipment is located Inquire about training (first-aid, CPR, defensive driving, policies/procedures, etc.) Know your Safety Officers phone number HR Central Safety DURING A MINOR EMERGENCY Examples Small cuts Bruises Minor burns Vehicle accidents (2 vehicles) Ensure there are no major injuries Basic first-aid Notify supervisor Call your Safety Officer

HR Central Safety DURING A MAJOR EMERGENCY (CATASTROPHIC EVENT) Examples Multiple Vehicle (3+) Accident Fatality Amputation Head Injury Heart Attack Serious Electrical Shock 2+ employees seriously injured Multiple Fractures Serious Burns Stroke Spinal Injury Potential Media Attention

Basic first-aid Check Call 911 Care Call the Catastrophic Event Hotline at 713-221-0404 HR Central Safety SAFETY UPDATES How to make a difference James Garza HR Safety Officer Heat Precautions 911 Temperature related calls January 1, 2008 to July 14, 2008 195 January 1, 2009 to July 14, 2009 327 40% Increase Beat the Heat 1. Before conducting outdoor activities and feeling thirsty, drink plenty of water and electrolyte-replacement beverages.

2. Avoid beverages or food sources with caffeine, alcohol or large amounts of sugar because these can actually result in the loss of body fluid. 3. Conduct outdoor work or exercise in the early morning or evening when it is cooler. Individuals unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment need to start slowly and gradually increase heat exposure over several weeks. Take frequent breaks in the shade or in an airconditioned facility. 4. A wide-brimmed, loose-fitting hat that allows ventilation helps prevent sunburn and heat-related emergencies. A tight-fitting baseball cap is not the best choice when conducting strenuous outdoors activities. 5. Sunscreen also helps protect injury from the sun's rays and reduces the risk of sunburn. 6. Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing that permits the evaporation of perspiration. 7. Do not leave children, senior citizens or pets unattended in a vehicle. Those that made a difference Presentation of Safety Awards Those that made a difference Award of Achievement City of Houston Overall Those that made a difference

Award of Honor Parks & Recreation Those that made a difference Award of Merit Houston Police Department Those that made a difference Award of Honor Houston Emergency Center Those that made a difference Award of Honor Perfect Record Human Resources Those that made a difference Award of Honor Perfect Record Legal Department Those that made a difference Award of Merit Houston Public Library Those that made a difference Award of Honor Perfect Record Municipal Courts Administration Those that made a difference

Award of Achievement Solid Waste Management Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record Finance Department Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record Information Technology Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record Planning & Development Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record City Council Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record City Secretary Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record

Controllers Office Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record Mayors Administration Those that made a difference Safety Excellence Award Perfect Record Municipal Courts Judicial Those that made a difference Solid Waste Management 104 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Achievement 29 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Merit Total = 133 Awards Those that made a difference Solid Waste Management Safe Driver Awards Kenneth Anderson Merit Harry Antonine Achievement Fidel Arias Merit Zoilo Arias Achievement Michael Augustine Achievement Earnest Austin Achievement Glenn Bailey

Achievement John Bell Merit Tommie Bell Achievement Beverly Benning Achievement Rachel Bias Achievement Donnie Birden Achievement Derrick Brantley Achievement Cedric Brown Achievement Darrell Brown Achievement Billy Callis Achievement Derek Campbell Achievement Tyreece Ceasar Achievement Jerry Chandler Achievement Gary Clark Achievement Russell Cole Achievement Shirley Coleman Achievement Darrell Corbin Merit Edwin Darby Achievement Andre Darden Achievement Michael Davis Achievement Redell Davis Achievement Lionel Deshotel Achievement Logan Deshotel

Achievement David Dirden Achievement Thomas Edison Achievement Cecil Edwards Achievement Demetrick Emerson Achievement Michael Fair Achievement Juan Garza Achievement Robert Garza Merit Van Glass Achievement Rufus Graves Achievement Larry Green Achievement Jo Ann Grover Achievement Harold Groves, Jr. Achievement Murray Guillory Achievement William Hatter Achievement Santos Henriquez Merit Jose Higareda Achievement Hans Hill Achievement Phillip Hodges Achievement Phillip Holden Merit Raymond Hughes Achievement Eva Humphrey Achievement Kerry Jefferson Achievement Those that made a difference

Solid Waste Management Safe Driver Awards Charles Johnson Tony Johnson Aaron Lewis Carlise Locks Achievement Lamar Lucas Sam Martin Chester McGowen Adam Mena Albert Mitchell Richard Moses Hugo Munoz Warren Noble Wilson Oaks Godfrey Osborne Mark Phalesburg Roger Pollard Anthony Reed Alberto Robledo Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit

Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Merit Merit Jeffrey Johnson Achievement Marque Johnson Achievement Oscar Jones Achievement Nathaniel Lathan Achievement Bradley Lewis Achievement Derrick Lightfoot Achievement Achievement Darriel Lovings Achievement James Lucas Michael Manning Manuel Martinez Sheray McKinney Jose Mendiola Thomas Mitchell Kenneth Moshay Michael Neal Lionel Nuels Eric Oliver Armando Oyervidez Jason Plair

Reginald Pride Demetria Reed Terrance Ruben Merit Merit Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Derwin Martin Verniss McFarland Henry McNeese Jesse Millan Perry Moore Herbert Mouton Yvon Neal Wesley Oaks Mark Orphey Henry Patterson E.L. Pleasant, Jr. Joel Ramirez

Rodney Richards Isidro Salmeron Achievement Achievement Merit Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Merit Merit Merit Those that made a difference Solid Waste Management Safe Driver Awards Anthony Senegal, Jr. Adrian Smith Sakhon Sok Nathan Taylor Laveta Tidwell Jose Tristan Santos Ventura Cornelius White Leo Williams Billy Williams

Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement Merit Merit Achievement Merit Merit William Sherrard Freddie Smith Kenneth Stills David Thomas Lizzie Toran Terrance Tyler Bryan Walker Darrell White Samuel Williams Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement

Jered Sherman Achievement Larry Smith Merit Roopsingh Teelucksingh Merit Derek Thomas Achievement Nguyen Trinh Achievement Mario Valdez Merit Reginald Watson Achievement Gary Williams Achievement Vernon Wright Achievement Those that made a difference Houston Airport System 5 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Honor 22 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Achievement 10 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Merit Total = 37 Awards Those that made a

difference Houston Airport System Safe Driver Charles Jones Honor Cecil Butts Honor Samuel Johnson Achievement Rigoberto Hernandez Honor Hayden Hood Achievement Joel Zarate Honor Robert Honor JeremyHensley Rodger Achievement Benjamin Vega Merit Brian Hing Achievement Debra Reed Merit Milton

Martinez Omar Lopez Achievement Merit Charlie Herrera Merit Frank Silva Merit Glenda Potter Merit Josephine Brantley Merit Victor Alvarez Merit Robert Lamy Merit Walter Heckman Willie Collins Debra Page Derek Parrott Charles Siverand Calvin Smith Henry Precella Jimmy Jackson Algernon Coleman Martin Davis Lino Gonzalez Darrell Granderson Alverto Moreira Stella Jackson

Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Horace Smith Burton Scott David Lu Marek Kedierski Samuel Johnson Hayden Hood Jeremy Rodger Brian Hing Omar Lopez Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement

Achievement Achievement Achievement Those that made a difference Health and Human Services 1 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Honor 12 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Achievement 7 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Merit 1 - Public Employee Safe Worker Award of Merit Total = 21 Awards Those that made a difference Health and Human Services Safe Driver Remonda Robinson Achievement Samuel Johnson Achievement Sandra Rico Achievement Gary Lee Merit Hayden Hood Achievement Ching-Ping Yang Merit

Jeremy Rodger Tina Thomason Achievement Jackie Scott Achievement Achievement Brian Hing Rene Ruiz Achievement Omar Miller Lopez Achievement Achievement Chris Greg Melancon Merit David Martinez Merit Glenn Hudson Merit Luis Estrada Achievement LaDonya Davis Achievement Jesse Clay Achievement Jeffrey Hastings Honor Rosalind LaFleur Achievement Jeffrey Erdman Merit

Larry Prescott Merit Mauricio Zepeda Achievement Tina Davis Achievement Safe Worker Larry Prescott Merit Those that made a difference General Services Department Safe Worker Jimmy Cooper Betty Glaze Raul Ibanez Robert Berry Merit Merit Merit Merit Those that made a difference Public Works & Engineering 4 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Honor 39 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Achievement 25 - Public Employee Safe Driver Awards of Merit 1 - Public Employee Safe Worker Awards of Honor

61 - Public Employee Safe Worker Awards of Achievement 14 - Public Employee Safe Worker Awards of Merit Total = 144 Awards Those that made a difference Public Works & Engineering Safe Driver Phillip Nolley Honor Vincent E. Poole Merit Robert Joseph Merit Mark Payne Merit Roy Sanders Merit J Soto Merit William Young Merit Calvin Miller Merit Angel Leal Achievement Cesar Lopez Achievement Holly Martin Achievement Feagon D. McMahon

Achievement George Nealy Achievement Richard A. Price Achievement Brenda Roberson Achievement Joseph Sinegal Achievement Kelvin J. Williams Achievement Jose Flores Achievement James Sonnier Achievement Lee Thompson Achievement Winfrey Vinson Achievement Lovell Bonton Achievement Michael Kennedy Achievement Michael W. Green Achievement Horace Guidry Achievement Rosalind R. Harmon Achievement Michael A. Henderson Achievement Cynthia Hicks Achievement Patricia Hill Achievement Andre T. Hodge Achievement Antoine Holman Achievement Denise M. Holmes Achievement Alma Huff Achievement James Jenkins Achievement LaRonda F. Jones Achievement Walter King, Jr. Achievement Clifton Austin Achievement Patricia Bailey Achievement Randy T. Belcher Achievement Kenneth Birmingham Achievement Leslie Davis Achievement

Paulette Declouet Achievement Roland Fernandez Achievement Steven S. Freeman Achievement Terry Freeman Achievement Nora Galvan Achievement Reginald Petties Honor Juan Lopez Honor Erma Sumpter Merit Bill Tran Merit Henry Williams Merit Alfredo Zapata Merit Lloyd Blackmon Merit Monica Ayarzagoitia Merit Robert Kunschick Merit Herbert Bowers Merit Joseph Brown Merit

Don Daniels Merit Vicente Diaz Merit Eddie Emanuel Merit Those that made a difference Public Works & Engineering Safe Driver Jimmie Emanuel Richard Gross Sergio Vargas Merit Merit Honor Curtis Evans Isaias Hernandez Lloyd Deboest Merit Merit Achievement Alfonso Flores Kent Houston Merit

Merit Public Works & Engineering Safe Worker Joe R. Rivers Vincent E. Poole Jason A. Hicks Mona Agitos Arthur Myers Larry Clark Joshua House Thomas Lucas Luis Olvera Darrell Randle Kenneth Davis Christopher Horn Merit Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Marlon K. Forside Achievement Eddie Hudson

Merit Pedro Zertuche Achievement Joseph C. Owens Achievement James H. Horace Achievement Derrick Small Achievement Stephen Telus Merit Darell Harper Achievement Trent Bonner Achievement Michael Boutte Achievement Martin Chaney Achievement Cleveland Johnson Achievement Randy Fuller Achievement Luis Martinez Merit Dwight Lewis Achievement Clifford Molo Achievement Demetrius Hicks Achievement Harrison Woodard Merit Zoe Woodard Achievement Efrem Stokenberry Achievement Goree Carter Achievement Jimmie Tryon

Merit George Rogers Merit Bennie Henton Merit Those that made a difference Public Works & Engineering Safe Worker Audrey Watson Freddy Alexander Carolyn Riley Reginald Henderson Darrell Stamps Rosalinda Torres Rickie Smith James Henry Sadtreat Gray Jack Allen George Vergis Consandra Harris Sandra Thomas Timothy Withers Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement

Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement Honor Richard Hadnot Lester Williams Morlon Titus Nathan Egans Dana Willis Marvin Stuart, Jr. Jennifer Roston Gregory Morgan Simanal Foster Dextor Brown Jocelyn Smith-George Clifton Jones Roland Mathews Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement

Achievement Merit Achievement Merit Achievement Tenseha Crosby Bryan Davis Tracie Jones Ellirich Sheppard Kelvin Walker Edward Sotelo Clinton White Demetria McWilliams Michael Braxton Amanda Womack Devontee Johnson Steven Williams Danny Delaney Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement Merit Achievement Achievement Achievement Achievement

Achievement Achievement Those that made a difference Betsy Ramos Human Resources Department Salary Continuation Administration Manager Certificates of Appreciation Workers Compensation Automation System Certificates of Appreciation Workers Compensation Automation Project ARA Karen Davidson ERP Earl Lambert MaryAnn Grant Ulysses Fogg Vijaya Devireddy Farshid Amini Steve Ashley William Nix Health and Humans Services Kamikka Phillips Tonia White

Human Resources Andrea Arenas Candy Clarke Aldridge WagnerDonetta Potier Mary Perrow Sylvia Torres Betsy Ramos Cathie Marie Sosa Ramiro Cano Houston Airport System Ana Maldonado Charlotte Jones Maylon Wesley Houston Fire Department Ericson De Los Santos Leticia Oman Lydia Henn Sofie Chea Public Works and Engineering Department Carla Carswell Donna Caldwell Lisa Davis Joanne McMichael Pearlie Bettis

Houston Police Department Barbara Buckner Barbara Collins Clorisa Holbert Karen Ward Leslie Merriman Susan Jones Solid Waste Management Lehai Tran Reyna Rojas You Can Make a Difference Closing Remarks Ramiro Cano Please complete the survey

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