The Holocaust Only after we assimilate the history

The Holocaust Only after we assimilate the history

The Holocaust Only after we assimilate the history of the Holocaust can we transform the future. Alan Rosenberg, Professor of Philosophy, Queens College A teaching resource created by the Birmingham Holocaust Education Committee. July 2007 www.bhamholocausteducation.org The Holocaust Get out a sheet of paper and prepare it for notes. We will be taking notes using the Cornell Style of note taking.

The Holocaust The State sponsored, systematic persecution and annihilation of European Jewry by Nazi Germany and its collaborators between 1933 and 1945. Jews were the primary victims 6 million were murdered. From the Greek word meaning a sacrifice by burning.

In Hebrew the term shoah is used, meaning catastrophe. The Holocaust was Never before had aUnique: government, one that had prided itself on its own citizens high level of education and culture, sought to define a religious group as a race that must be eliminated throughout an entire continent, not just within a single country. Never before had a government harnessed the immense power of technology for such destructive ends, culminating in the horror of Auschwitz a death camp that, at its peak, processed 10,000 Jews a day.

Never before had a government summoned their best and brightest people to mobilize destruction and used mobile killing units (Einsatzgruppen) to systematically kill approximately 1.5 million individuals in 2 years. Never before had a government sought to dehumanize a group through such a devastatingly thorough and systematic use of propaganda that included the use of film, education, public Two Thousand Years of Jewish Life in Europe by 1933 A Comparison - Jews in the World in the Early 19 th Century & Early 20th Century

Jewish Life Before the War Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one. - Eleanor Roosevelt Malka Orkin (left) and her friend Tusia Goldberg. Tusia, whose father later became a member of the Bialystok ghetto Jewish council, Lova Warszawczyk

rides his tricycle in the garden of his home in Warsaw shortly before the A group of Jewish children pose in their bathing suits while vacationing in the resort town of Swider, near Warsaw. The two girls on the right are Gina and Ziuta Szczecinski. Both perished during the Jewish family celebration in Radomsko, Poland. Almost all

of this towns 12,000 Jews were deported to the death camp at Treblinka. Group portrait of the extended family of Mottle Leichter in Janow Podlaski, Poland. Only 3 in the picture survived. Sisters Hanneke and Jenneke Leydesdorff as small children one year before the German

occupation. The sisters survived, both parents died. Yosef Ginzberg watches his granddaughter Tamar play with a ball. Yosef was murdered in Ponar outside of Vilna. Tamar survived the war in Siberia.

Jankel Stiel and his child. Both were killed in Belzec. Two young children play outside next to a baby carriage in Bogdan, Transcarpathia. In 1944, the children and their mother were deported from

Bogdan to Auschwitz, where they all perished. Bertha Gruneberg with her son, Rene, at a park in Boekelo. The child survived the war, but both his parents were killed. Portrait of Mina Nattel and Beno Schmelkis on a balcony in Rzeszow, Poland during their engagement party.

During the war Mina, Beno and their daughter Rachel were killed by the Germans. Portrait of a Jewish bride and groom in Telsiai, Lithuania. Both perished. A Jewish mother (Regina) with her children in Naleczow, Poland between 1934-1937. All perished. Bystanders (85%) Victims Rescuers (< 0.5%)

Perpetrators (< 10%) The Victims It is true that not all victims were Jews, but all Jews were victims. - Elie Wiesel, 1995 Jews Political Opponents Habitual Criminals Handicapped Homosexuals Jehovahs Witnesses Roma & Sinti Poles (Gypsies) Freemasons

Immigrants Soviet P.O.W.s American P.O.W.s African-Germans Extermination Deportation Ghettoization Confiscation Exclusion Identification Who was Hitler?

Born in Austria. Reared Catholic. Aspired to be an artist. Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts on two occasions. Never attended college. Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna.

Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Born in Austria Braunau-amInn Insert Hitler Family tree Who Was Hitler? Born in Austria.

Reared Catholic. Aspired to be an artist. Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts on two occasions. Never attended college. Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna.

Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Reared Catholic Adolf (center) with schoolmates, 1900. St. Michaels Catholic Church attended by Hitler as a child. Leonding, Austria Who Was Hitler? Born in Austria.

Reared Catholic. Aspired to be an artist. Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts on two occasions. Never attended college. Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna.

Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Aspired to be an Artist Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts Never Attended College Oedensplatz (Feldherrnhalle), Munich, 1914 Artist: Adolf Hitler The Rotterdam Cathedral Munich, 1930

Artist: Adolf Hitler Who Was Hitler? Born in Austria. Reared Catholic. Aspired to be an artist. Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts on two occasions. Never attended college.

Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna. Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna. Hitlers description in Mein Kampf of how he had become an antisemite in Vienna: For me this was a time of the

greatest spiritual upheaval I have ever had to go through. I had ceased to be a weak-kneed cosmopolitan and become an antisemite. Vienna, he said, had significantly contributed to his becoming antisemitic: At the time of this bitter struggle between spiritual education and cold reason, the visual instruction of the Vienna Opera House by Adolf Hitler Vienna streets had performed invaluable services. Who Was Hitler?

Born in Austria. Reared Catholic. Aspired to be an artist. Rejected by Vienna Academy of Arts on two occasions. Never attended college. Exposed to antisemitic influences while in Vienna.

Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Moved to Germany to avoid Austrian draft. Fought for Germany in World War I. Hitler served in the Bavarian contingent of the German Army.

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