The Data Link Layer Chapter 3 Computer Networks,

The Data Link Layer Chapter 3 Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Data Link Layer Design Issues Network layer services

Framing Error control Flow control Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Data Link Layer

Algorithms for achieving: Reliable, + Efficient, communication of a whole units frames (as opposed to bits Physical Layer) between two machines. Two machines are connected by a communication channel that acts conceptually like a wire (e.g., telephone line, coaxial cable, or wireless channel). Essential property of a channel that makes it wire-like connection is that the bits are delivered in exactly the same order in which they are sent.

Data Link Layer For ideal channel (no distortion, unlimited bandwidth and no delay) the job of data link layer would be trivial. However, limited bandwidth, distortions and delay makes this job very difficult. Data Link Layer Design Issues

Physical layer delivers bits of information to and from data link layer. The functions of Data Link Layer are: 1. Providing a well-defined service interface to the network layer. 2. Dealing with transmission errors. 3. Regulating the flow of data so that slow receivers are not swamped by fast senders. Data Link layer Takes the packets from Physical layer, and Encapsulates them into frames

Data Link Layer Design Issues Each frame has a frame header a field for holding the packet, and frame trailer. Frame Management is what Data Link Layer does.

See figure in the next slide: Packets and Frames Relationship between packets and frames. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Services Provided to the Network Layer Principal Service Function of the data link layer is to transfer the data from the network layer on the source machine to the

network layer on the destination machine. Process in the network layer that hands some bits to the data link layer for transmission. Job of data link layer is to transmit the bits to the destination machine so they can be handed over to the network layer there (see figure in the next slide). Network Layer Services (a) Virtual communication. (b) Actual communication. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Possible Services Offered 1. Unacknowledged connectionless service. 2. Acknowledged connectionless service. 3. Acknowledged connection-oriented service. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Unacknowledged Connectionless Service

It consists of having the source machine send independent frames to the destination machine without having the destination machine acknowledge them. Example: Ethernet, Voice over IP, etc. in all the communication channel were real time operation is more important that quality of transmission. Acknowledged Connectionless Service

Each frame send by the Data Link layer is acknowledged and the sender knows if a specific frame has been received or lost. Typically the protocol uses a specific time period that if has passed without getting acknowledgment it will re-send the frame. This service is useful for commutation when an unreliable

channel is being utilized (e.g., 802.11 WiFi). Network layer does not know frame size of the packets and other restriction of the data link layer. Hence it becomes necessary for data link layer to have some mechanism to optimize the transmission. Acknowledged Connection Oriented Service

Source and Destination establish a connection first. Each frame sent is numbered Data link layer guarantees that each frame sent is indeed received. It guarantees that each frame is received only once and that all frames are received in the correct order. Examples: Satellite channel communication, Long-distance telephone communication, etc. Acknowledged Connection Oriented

Service Three distinct phases: 1. Connection is established by having both side initialize variables and counters needed to keep track of which frames have been received and which ones have not. 2. One or more frames are transmitted. 3. Finally, the connection is released freeing up the variables, buffers, and other resources used to maintain the connection. Framing

To provide service to the network layer the data link layer must use the service provided to it by physical layer. Stream of data bits provided to data link layer is not guaranteed to be without errors. Errors could be: Number of received bits does not match number of transmitted

bits (deletion or insertion) Bit Value It is up to data link layer to correct the errors if necessary. Framing Transmission of the data link layer starts with breaking up the

bit stream into discrete frames Computation of a checksum for each frame, and Include the checksum into the frame before it is transmitted. Receiver computes its checksum error for a receiving frame and if it is different from the checksum that is being transmitted will have to deal with the error. Framing is more difficult than one could think! Framing Methods 1. 2.

3. 4. Byte count. Flag bytes with byte stuffing. Flag bits with bit stuffing. Physical layer coding violations. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Byte Count Framing Method

It uses a field in the header to specify the number of bytes in the frame. Once the header information is being received it will be used to determine end of the frame. See figure in the next slide: Trouble with this algorithm is that when the count is incorrectly received the destination will get out of synch with transmission.

Destination may be able to detect that the frame is in error but it does not have a means (in this algorithm) how to correct it. Framing (1) A byte stream. (a) Without errors. (b) With one error. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Flag Bytes with Byte Staffing Framing Method

This methods gets around the boundary detection of the frame by having each appended by the frame start and frame end special bytes. If they are the same (beginning and ending byte in the frame) they are called flag byte. In the next slide figure this byte is shown as FLAG. If the actual data contains a byte that is identical to the FLAG byte (e.g., picture, data stream, etc.) the convention that can

be used is to have escape character inserted just before the FLAG character. Framing (2) a) b) A frame delimited by flag bytes. Four examples of byte sequences before and after byte stuffing. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Flag Bits with Bit Stuffing Framing Method This methods achieves the same thing as Byte Stuffing method by using Bits (1) instead of Bytes (8 Bits). It was developed for High-level Data Link Control (HDLC) protocol. Each frames begins and ends with a special bit patter:

01111110 or 0x7E <- Flag Byte Whenever the senders data link layer encounters five consecutive 1s in the data it automatically stuffs a 0 bit into the outgoing bit stream. USB uses bit stuffing. Framing (3) Bit stuffing. (a) The original data. (b) The data as they appear on the line. (c) The data as they are stored in the receivers memory after destuffing. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Framing Many data link protocols use a combination of presented methods for safety. For example in Ethernet and 802.11 each frame begin with a well-defined pattern called a preamble. Preamble is typically 72 bits long. It is then followed by a length fileld.

Error Control After solving the marking of the frame with start and end the data link layer has to handle eventual errors in transmission or detection. Ensuring that all frames are delivered to the network layer at the destination and in proper order.

Unacknowledged connectionless service: it is OK for the sender to output frames regardless of its reception. Reliable connection-oriented service: it is NOT OK. Error Control Reliable connection-oriented service usually will provide a sender with some feedback about what is happening at the

other end of the line. Receiver Sends Back Special Control Frames. If the Sender Receives positive Acknowledgment it will know that the frame has arrived safely. Timer and Frame Sequence Number for the Sender is Necessary to handle the case when there is no response (positive or negative) from the Receiver . Flow Control

Important Design issue for the cases when the sender is running on a fast powerful computer and receiver is running on a slow low-end machine. Two approaches: 1. Feedback-based flow control 2. Rate-based flow control Feedback-based Flow Control

Receiver sends back information to the sender giving it permission to send more data, or Telling sender how receiver is doing. Rate-based Flow Control Built in mechanism that limits the rate at which sender may transmit data, without the need for feedback from the receiver. Error Detection and Correction Two basic strategies to deal with errors:

1. Include enough redundant information to enable the receiver to deduce what the transmitted data must have been. Error correcting codes. 2. Include only enough redundancy to allow the receiver to deduce that an error has occurred (but not which error). Error detecting codes. Error Detection and Correction Error codes are examined in Link Layer because this is the first place that we have run up against the

problem of reliability transmitting groups of bits. Codes are reused because reliability is an overall concern. The error correcting code are also seen in the physical layer for noise channels. Commonly they are used in link, network and transport layer. Error Detection and Correction Error codes have been developed after long fundamental research conducted in mathematics. Many protocol standards get codes from the large

field in mathematics. Error Detection & Correction Code (1) 1. 2. 3. 4. Hamming codes. Binary convolutional codes. Reed-Solomon codes.

Low-Density Parity Check codes. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Error Detection & Correction Code

All the codes presented in previous slide add redundancy to the information that is being sent. A frame consists of m data bits (message) and r redundant bits (check). Block code - the r check bits are computed solely as function of the m data bits with which they are associated. Systemic code the m data bits are send directly along with the check bits. Linear code the r check bits are computed as a linear function of the m data bits.

Error Detection & Correction Code n total length of a block (i.e., n = m + r) (n, m) code n bit codeword containing n bits. m/n code rate (range for noisy channel and close to 1 for high-quality channel).

Error Detection & Correction Code Example Transmitted: 10001001 Received: 10110001 XOR operation gives number of bits that are different. XOR: 00111000 Number of bit positions in which two codewords differ is called Hamming Distance. It shows that two codes are d distance apart, and it will require d

errors to convert one into the other. Error Detection & Correction Code All 2m possible data messages are legal, but due to the way the check bits are computers not all 2n possible code words are used. Only small fraction of 2m/2n=1/2r are possible will be legal codewords. The error-detecting and error-correcting codes of the block code depend on this Hamming distance. To reliably detect d error, one would need a distance d+1 code.

To correct d error, one would need a distance 2d+1 code. Error Detection & Correction Code All 2m possible data messages are legal, but due to the way the check bits are computers not all 2n possible code words are used. Only small fraction of 2m/2n=1/2r are possible will be legal codewords. The error-detecting and error-correcting codes of the block code depend on this Hamming distance. To reliably detect d error, one would need a

distance d+1 code. To correct d error, one would need a distance 2d+1 code. Error Detection & Correction Code Example: 4 valid codes: 0000000000 0000011111 1111100000 1111111111 Minimal Distance of this code is 5 => can correct double

errors and it can detect quadruple errors. 0000000111 => single or double bit error. Hence the receiving end must assume the original transmission was 0000011111. 0000000000 => had triple error that was received as 0000000111 it would be detected in error. Error Detection & Correction Code

One cannot perform double errors and at the same time detect quadruple errors. Error correction requires evaluation of each candidate codeword which may be time consuming search. Through design this search time can be minimized. In theory if n = m + r, this requirement becomes: (m + r + 1) 2r Hamming Code Codeword: b1 b2 b3 b4 .

Check bits: The bits that are powers of 2 (p1, p2, p4, p8, p16, ). The rest of bits (m3, m5, m6, m7, m9, ) are filled with m data bits. Example of the Hamming code with m = 7 data bits and r = 4 check bits is given in the next slide. The Hamming Code Consider a message having four data bits (D) which is to be transmitted as a 7-bit codeword by adding three error control bits. This would be called a (7,4)

code. The three bits to be added are three EVEN Parity bits (P), where the parity of each is computed on different subsets of the message bits as shown below. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 D D D P D P P 7-BIT CODEWORD D - D - D -

P (EVEN PARITY) D D - - D P - (EVEN PARITY) D D D P -

- (EVEN PARITY) - Hamming Code Why Those Bits? - The three parity bits (1,2,4) are related to

the data bits (3,5,6,7) as shown at right. In this diagram, each overlapping circle corresponds to one parity bit and defines the four bits contributing to that parity computation. For example, data bit 3 contributes to parity bits 1 and 2. Each circle (parity bit) encompasses a total of four bits, and each circle must have EVEN parity. Given four data bits, the three parity bits can easily be chosen to ensure this condition. It can be observed that changing any one bit numbered 1..7 uniquely affects the three parity bits. Changing bit 7 affects all three parity bits, while an error in bit 6 affects only parity bits 2 and 4, and an error in a parity bit affects only that bit. The location of any single bit error is determined directly upon

checking the three parity circles. Hamming Code Hamming Code For example, the message 1101 would be sent as 1100110, since: 7 6 5

4 3 2 1 1 1

0 0 1 1 0 7-BIT CODEWORD

1 - 0 - 1 -

0 (EVEN PARITY) 1 1 - -

1 1 - (EVEN PARITY) 1 1

0 0 - - - (EVEN PARITY)

Hamming Codes When these seven bits are entered into the parity circles, it can be confirmed that the choice of these three parity bits ensures that the parity within each circle is EVEN, as shown here. Hamming Code It may now be observed that if an error occurs in any of the

seven bits, that error will affect different combinations of the three parity bits depending on the bit position. For example, suppose the above message 1100110 is sent and a single bit error occurs such that the codeword 1110110 is received: transmitted message received message 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 ------------>

1110110 BIT: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 BIT: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 The above error (in bit 5) can be corrected by examining which of the three parity bits was affected by the bad bit: Hamming Code 7 6

5 4 3 2 1 1

1 1 0 1 1 0

7-BIT CODEWORD 1 - 1 - 1

- 0 (EVEN PARITY) NOT! 1 1

1 - - 1 1 -

(EVEN PARITY) OK! 0 1 1 1

0 - - - (EVEN PARITY) NOT!

1 Hamming Code In fact, the bad parity bits labeled 101 point directly to the bad bit since 101 binary equals 5. Examination of the 'parity circles' confirms that any single bit error could be corrected in this way. The value of the Hamming code can be summarized: 1. Detection of 2 bit errors (assuming no correction is attempted);

2. Correction of single bit errors; 3. Cost of 3 bits added to a 4-bit message. The ability to correct single bit errors comes at a cost which is less than sending the entire message twice. (Recall that simply sending a message twice accomplishes no error correction.) Error Detection Codes (2) Example of an (11, 7) Hamming code correcting a single-bit error. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Convolutional Codes Not a block code There is no natural message size or encoding boundary as in a block code. The output depends on the current and previous input bits.

Encoder has memory. The number of previous bits on which the output depends is called the constraint length of the code. They are deployed as part of the GSM mobile phone system Satellite Communications, and 802.11 (see example in the previous slide). Error Detection Codes (3) The NASA binary convolutional code used in 802.11.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Convolutional Encoders Like any error-correcting code, a convolutional code works by adding some structured redundant information to the user's

data and then correcting errors using this information. A convolutional encoder is a linear system. A binary convolutional encoder can be represented as a shift register. The outputs of the encoder are modulo 2 sums of the values in the certain register's cells. The input to the encoder is either the unencoded sequence (for non-recursive codes) or the unencoded sequence added with the values of some register's cells (for recursive codes). Convolutional codes can be systematic and non-systematic. Systematic codes are those where an unencoded sequence is a part of the output sequence. Systematic codes are almost always recursive, conversely, non-recursive codes are almost

always non-systematic. Convolutional Encoders A combination of register's cells that forms one of the output streams (or that is added with the input stream for recursive codes) is defined by a polynomial. Let m be the maximum degree of the polynomials constituting a code, then K=m+1 is a constraint length of the code. Figure 1. A standard NASA convolutional

encoder with polynomials (171,133). Convolutional Encoders For example, for the decoder on the Figure 1, the polynomials are: g1(z)=1+z+z2+z3+z6 g2(z)=1+z2+z3+z5+z6

A code rate is an inverse number of output polynomials. For the sake of clarity, in this article we will restrict ourselves to the codes with rate R=1/2. Decoding procedure for other codes is similar. Encoder polynomials are usually denoted in the octal notation. For the above example, these designations are 1111001 =

171 and 1011011 = 133. The constraint length of this code is 7. An example of a recursive convolutional encoder is on the Figure 2. Example of the Convolutional Encoder Figure 2. A recursive convolutional encoder. Trellis Diagram

A convolutional encoder is often seen as a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to some value of the encoder's register. Given the input bit value, from a certain state the encoder can move to two other states. These state transitions constitute a diagram which is called a trellis diagram. A trellis diagram for the code on the Figure 2 is depicted on

the Figure 3. A solid line corresponds to input 0, a dotted line to input 1 (note that encoder states are designated in such a way that the rightmost bit is the newest one). Each path on the trellis diagram corresponds to a valid sequence from the encoder's output. Conversely, any valid sequence from the encoder's output can be represented as a path on the trellis diagram. One of the possible paths is denoted as red (as an example). Trellis Diagram Figure 3. A trellis diagram corresponding to

the encoder on the Figure 2. Trellis Diagram Note that each state transition on the diagram corresponds to a pair of output bits. There are only two allowed transitions for every state, so there are two allowed pairs of output bits, and the two other pairs are forbidden. If an error occurs, it is very likely that the receiver will get a set of forbidden pairs, which don't constitute a path on the trellis diagram. So, the task of the decoder is to find a path on the trellis diagram which is the

closest match to the received sequence. Trellis Diagram Let's define a free distance df as a minimal Hamming distance between two different allowed binary sequences (a Hamming distance is defined as a number of differing bits). A free distance is an important property of the convolutional code. It influences a number of closely located errors the

decoder is able to correct. Viterbi Algorithm Viterbi algorithm reconstructs the maximum-likelihood path for a given input sequence. Error-Detecting Codes (1) Linear, systematic block codes 1. Parity. 2. Checksums.

3. Cyclic Redundancy Checks (CRCs). Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Parity Bit Error Detection Block Size (m) 1000 bits from the equation: ( + + 1 ) 2

we need (r) 10 check bits (1011 < 1024). 1 Mbit of data would require 10 kbits. To detect a block with a single bit of error, one parity bit would suffice. Once every 1000 blocks (bit error rate is 10-6) one extra block would have to be re-transmitted. Parity Bit Error Detection

Problem with multiple bit errors in burst errors. Considerer the data stream as a matrix of n bits by k bits. Each (k) row is computed a parity. Interleaving is used to compute parity in different order from that that is being transmitted. Compute parity for each n columns

Transmit the data as k rows. The last row we will send the n parity bits. Example in the next slide gives the case for n=7 and k=7. Parity Error-Detecting Codes (2) Interleaving of parity bits to detect a burst error. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Parity Error-Detecting Codes A burst of length n+1 will pass undetected. The probability of that any of the n columns

will have the correct parity by accident is 0.5; the probability of a bad block being accepted as a good one is 2-n. Checksum Error-Detecting Codes A group of parity bits is one example of a checksum. Stronger checksums are based on a running sum of the data bits of the message. The checksum is usually placed at the end of the message complementary sum. Errors can be detected by summing the entire

received codeword, both data bits and checksum bits. If result is zero no error has been detected. Checksum Error-Detecting Codes Example if checksum is the 16-bit Internet error detection used as part of the IP protocol. It is applied to 16-bit words. It will detect an error for cases where parity detection fails. Checksum error would fail for: Deletion or addition of zero data,

Swapping part of the message, Messages splices in which parts of two packets are put together. Those are typical errors caused by faulty hardware. Checksum Error-Detecting Codes Fletchers checksum Includes positional component- adding the product of the data and its position to the running sum. The stronger kind of error-detecting code is Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) know as polynomial code.

A k-bit frame is regarded as the coefficient list for a polynomial with k terms ranging from xk-1 to x0 CRC Error-Detecting Codes Example: 110001: 1x5 + 1x4 + 0x3 + 0x2 + 0x1 + 1x0 Module 2 arithmetic Addition and Subtraction are equivalent to exclusive OR. Long division is carried the same way except that subtraction operation is again done module 2.

CRC Error-Detecting Codes Protocol requires that sender to agree in advance with the receiver on the generator polynomial, G(x). Both high- and low-order bits must be 1. CRC is computed for a frame of length m- bits corresponding that is longer than the G(x). When the receiver gets a checksummed frame it divides it by G(x). If there the result is not equal to zero it means that there has been transmission error. CRC Error-Detecting Codes

Algorithm: 1. Let r be the degree of G(x). Append r zero bits to the low-order end of the frame so it now contains m+r bits and corresponds to the polynomial xrM(x) 2. Divide the bit string corresponding to G(x) into the bit string corresponding to xrM(x) using modulo 2 division. 3. Subtract the remanider (which is always r or fewer bits) from the bit string corresponding to xrM(x) using module 2 subtraction. The result is the checksummed frame, T(x), to be transmitted.

CRC Error-Detecting Codes Example: Frame: 1101011111 Generator:x4+x+1 Error-Detecting Codes (3) Example calculation of the CRC Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 CRC Error-Detecting Codes

Certain polynomials have become international standards: IEEE 802 x32 + x26 + x23 + x22 + x16 + x12 + x11 + x10 + x8 + x7 + x4 + x2 + x1 + 1 Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Elementary Data Link Protocols (1) Utopian Simplex Protocol Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol

Error-Free Channel Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol

Noisy Channel Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Elementary Data Link Protocols (2) Implementation of the physical, data link, and network layers. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Elementary Data Link Protocols Assumptions: 1. A wants to send a long stream of data to machine B.

2. It uses reliable connection-oriented service. 3. It assumes to have infinite supply of data ready to send, 4. It does not have to wait for data to be produced. 5. Machines A and B do not crash 6. Data link layer treads the data as packets of pure data whose every bit is to be delivered to the destination's network layer. Elementary Data Link Protocols Data Link layer job is to: FRAMEING: encapsulate the data packets in a frame

by adding the header and trailer. Elementary Data Link Protocols Error Correction and Detection: Control information is added to header, and Checksum is added to trailer. Frame is then transmitted to the other machine. Elementary Data Link Protocols Library procedures: to_physical_layer

from_physical_layer wait_for_event(&event) event object will contain the information what has happened. In the receiving end: Data is being received and the checksum is being computed. If the error has occurred the data link layer is being informed: event = chksum_err If the data has arrived undamaged: event = frame_arrival.

Elementary Data Link Protocols (3) ... Some definitions needed in the protocols to follow. These definitions are located in the file protocol.h. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Elementary Data Link Protocols (4) ... Some definitions needed in the protocols to follow. These definitions are located in the file protocol.h.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Elementary Data Link Protocols (5) Some definitions needed in the protocols to follow. These definitions are located in the file protocol.h. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Utopian Simplex Protocol (1) ...

A utopian simplex protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Utopian Simplex Protocol (2) A utopian simplex protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Utopian Simplex Protocol Unrealistic It does not handle flow control

It does not handle error correction Resembles connectionless service that relies on higher layer to solve those problems. Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol for a Noisy Channel (1) ... A simplex stop-and-wait protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol

for a Noisy Channel (2) A simplex stop-and-wait protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Simplex Protocol Solves the problem of flow control. Blocking acknowledgment of the reception of the frame partially achieves this. If acknowledgment frame gets lost the protocol will fail. Error correction is not implemented.

One direction only. Sliding Window Protocols Full duplex data transmission Running two instances of one of the previous protocols, Each uses separate data link for simplex data traffic in different directions (forward channel and reverse channel). Better idea is to use the same channel in both directions. A and B frames are intermixed with acknowledgment

frames from A and B. Kind field in the header of the incoming frame will be used to tell the difference. Sliding Window Protocols In addition to being able to use duplex communication, the further protocol improvement would be to send the acknowledgment frame together with the new data frame. This provides for a free ride. The technique of delaying the acknowledgment for a bit to be added to the next packet is know as

piggybacking. This technique add another complication. If the data frame is available within a short time period (less than msec) it will use piggybacking. Otherwise, it will send separate acknowledgment. Sliding Window At any instant of time the sender maintains a set of sequences numbers that correspond to frames that are permitted to be send. Those frames are said to fall within a sending window.

Receiver also maintains a receiving window that corresponds to the set of frames that it is permitted to accept. Sliding Window The sequence numbers within the senders window represent the frames that have been sent or can be sent but are not yet been acknowledged. Whenever the a new packet arrives from the network layer, it is given the next highest sequence number, and The upper edge of the window is advanced by one.

When acknowledgement arrives the lower edge is advance by one. This is how the protocol maintains the list of unacknowledged frames. Sliding Window Protocols A sliding window of size 1, with a 3-bit sequence number. (a) Initially. (b) After the first frame has been sent. Sliding Window Protocols

A sliding window of size 1, with a 3-bit sequence number (c) After the first frame has been received. (d) After the first acknowledgement has been received. Sliding Window Protocols (1) ... A positive acknowledgement with retransmission protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Sliding Window Protocols (2)

... A positive acknowledgement with retransmission protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Sliding Window Protocols (3) A positive acknowledgement with retransmission protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol Window size = 1 Stop-and-wait

Sender transmits a frame and waits for its acknowledgment before it sends the next one. Figure of next slide depicts such a protocol. One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol (1) ... A 1-bit sliding window protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol (2)

... A 1-bit sliding window protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol (3) A 1-bit sliding window protocol. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol (4) Two scenarios for protocol 4. (a) Normal case. (b) Abnormal

case. The notation is (seq, ack, packet number). An asterisk indicates where a network layer accepts a packet Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N Up-to-know the protocols depicted so far are based on the assumption that the time required for transmission and reception of the acknowledgment packets is negligible. If this assumptions is not true then round-trip time can have important implications in the efficiency of the communication and the bandwidth utilization.

Protocol Using Go-Back-N Example: 50 kbps satellite channel 500 msec round-trip propagation delay. Lets use Protocol 4 (previous slides) to send a 1000 bit frames via the satellite. t = 0: the sender starts the first frame t = 20 msec: the frame has been completely sent. t = 270 msec: the frame has fully arrived at the satellite.

t = 520 msec: the acknowledgment has arrived at the sender. Sender was blocked 500/520 or 96% of the time. In order to send the packed the sender utilized 4% of the available bandwidth. Protocol Using Go-Back-N The problem? Consequence of the rule that requires a sender to wait for an acknowledgment before sending another frame. Relaxing this condition will enable achieving significantly better throughput.

Solution! Allowing sender the transmit w frames before blocking. Acknowledgment will arrive for previous frames before the window becomes full. Protocol Using Go-Back-N Must correctly establish what is the actual size of w. Number of frames to fit inside the channel. Capacity of the channel is determined by Bandwidth in bits/sec

One-way transit time, or The bandwidth-delay product of the link: BD The actual size should be set to: w = 2BD+1 Protocol Using Go-Back-N Example: Link with the bandwidth of 50 kbps

One way transit time of 250 msec Bandwidth delay product is BD = 50 kbps x 250 msec = 12.5 kbits or 12.5 frames of 1000 bits. 2BD+1 = 26 frames. t = 0: sends a first frame and subsequent frames after 20 msec. t = 520 msec: acknowledgment for the first frame is received, while 26 frames were transmitted. Thereafter, acknowledgments will arrive every 20 msec.

Protocol Using Go-Back-N Just in time for the sender to continue transmitting. 25 or 26 unacknowledged frames will always be outstanding. Hence, the senders maximum window size is 26 frames. For smaller window size, the utilization of the link will be less than 100%. Upper bound of the link utilization: It does not allow for any frame processing time Treats acknowledgment frame as having zero length.

Protocol Using Go-Back-N From the equation: Large bandwidth-delay product requires a large window. With stop-and-wait for which w = 1, of there is even one frames worth of propagation delay, the efficiency will be less than 50%. Pipelining technique where the number of frames (much greater than 1) are send immediately. What will happen then when a certain frame is received in error?!

Protocol Using Go-Back-N (1) Pipelining and error recovery. Effect of an error when (a) receivers window size is 1 Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N (2) Pipelining and error recovery. Effect of an error when (b) receivers window size is large. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Protocol Using Go-Back-N (3) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N (4) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Protocol Using Go-Back-N (5) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N (6) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Protocol Using Go-Back-N (7) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N (8) ... A sliding window protocol using go-back-n.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Go-Back-N (9) A sliding window protocol using go-back-n. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Cumulative Acknowledgment When an acknowledgment comes in for frame n, frames n-1, n-2, are also automatically acknowledged. Because protocol 5 has multiple outstanding

frames, it logically needs multiple timers, one per outstanding frame. Each frame times out independently of all the other ones. The pending timeouts from a linked list, with each node of the list containing the Number of clock ticks until the timer expires, Frame being timed, A pointer to the next node Protocol Using Go-Back-N (10)

Simulation of multiple timers in software. (a) The queued timeouts (b) The situation after the first timeout has expired. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Selective Repeat The go-back-n protocol works well if errors are rare. If the line is poor it wastes a lot of bandwidth on retransmitting frames. A Selective Repeat protocol allows the receiver to accept and buffer the frames following a damaged or lost one.

Selective Repeat Sender and Receiver maintain a window of outstanding and acceptable sequence numbers, respectively. Sender: Window size starts a 0, Grows to some predefined maximum, Receiver: Is always fixed in size Equal to the predetermined maximum. Selective Repeat

Sender and Receiver maintain a window of outstanding and acceptable sequence numbers, respectively. Sender: Window size starts a 0, Grows to some predefined maximum, Receiver: Is always fixed in size Equal to the predetermined maximum. Has a buffer reserved for each sequence number within its fixed window. Associated with it is a bit (arrived) telling whether

the buffer is full or empty. Selective Repeat Whenever the frame arrives, the receiver does the following: Check the frame sequence number if it does fall within its fixed window, If this is the case and the sequence has not been received in previous transmissions it will be stored. It does so without regard if the frame contains the next packet expected by the network layer. This frame is going to be kept until all the lowernumbered frames have already been delivered to the

network layer in the correct order. Selective Repeat Consequential receive introduces further constrains on frame sequence numbers vs. the protocols that accepted frames in order. Protocol Using Selective Repeat (4) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (1) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (2) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (3) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (5) ...

A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (6) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (7)

... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (8) ... A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Protocol Using Selective Repeat (9)

A sliding window protocol using selective repeat. Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Selective Repeat Example: 3-bit sequence number, 7 frames are permitted to be send by transmitter, before it is required to wait (for acknowledgment). Window size restriction: Must be at most half the range of the sequence numbers. Window size for protocol 6 is (MAX_SEQ+1)/2.

Protocol Using Selective Repeat (10) a) b) c) d) Initial situation with a window of size7 After 7 frames sent and received but not acknowledged. Initial situation with a window size of 4. After 4 frames sent and received but not acknowledged.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Selective Repeat If there is a lot of traffic in one direction and no traffic in the other direction, the protocol will block when the sender window reaches its maximum. Axillary timer is started by start_ack_timer after an in-sequence data frame arrives. If no reverse traffic has presented itself for piggybacking before the timer expires, a separate acknowledgement will be send.

Interrupt due to this timer is called ack_timeout event. Example Data Link Protocols 1. Packet over SONET 2. ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop) Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Packet over SONET (1) Packet over SONET. (a) A protocol stack. (b) Frame relationships

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Packet over SONET (2) Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) Features 1. Separate packets, error detection 2. Link Control Protocol 3. Network Control Protocol Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Packet over SONET (3)

The PPP full frame format for unnumbered mode operation Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 Packet over SONET (4) State diagram for bringing a PPP link up and down Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop) (1) ADSL protocol stacks.

Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop) (1) AAL5 frame carrying PPP data Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011 End Chapter 3 Computer Networks, Fifth Edition by Andrew Tanenbaum and David Wetherall, Pearson Education-Prentice Hall, 2011

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • PowerPoint Presentation

    PowerPoint Presentation

    Treadwell Library, MGH1847- Sept 2014. No building, no books. Where we're going we don't need books "The newly redone library is vastly different from its former self in many ways. For one, it doesn't actually have any books. Instead there...
  • A Modest Proposal

    A Modest Proposal

    In response to this, Swift made this satirical essay. Tone. Tone is the writer's attitude or feeling about the subject of his text. Swift uses multiple tone shifts throughout the passage in order to make his proposal seem more "appealing".
  • HEPATITIS B VIRUS.Discovery and Development

    HEPATITIS B VIRUS.Discovery and Development

    HEPATITIS B VIRUS. Discovery and Development. Baruch S. Blumberg Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia PA, USA HEPATITIS B VIRUS MORPHOLOGY Characteristics Nucleic acid: DNA Classification: hepadnavirus type 1 Serotypes: multiple In vivo replication: reverse transcription in liver and other tissues...
  • c MODULE: Anti-Bullying Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Law Children with

    c MODULE: Anti-Bullying Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Law Children with

    Principal/Supervisor's Responsibility. The Principal/Supervisor or a designee will promptly commence an investigation. Principal/Supervisor makes preliminary determination regarding the need for referral to law enforcement and need for immediate intervention to protect the victim's safety. Principal/Supervisor or designee conducts ...
  • Network Security - DNS

    Network Security - DNS

    Eg. The record: ausregistry.com.au MX 10 mail In the ausregistry.com.au domain, defines the host mail to be the priority 10 mail server for the "ausregistry.com.au" domain The "NS" Record An NS record defines the authoritative Name servers for the domain.
  • FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Air National Guard AGR

    FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Air National Guard AGR

    AGRs are required to participate in UTAs. If excused these members must be in leave status. UTA does not count toward the 40 hour work week. AGRs are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and do not...
  • State of Minnesota Sample PowerPoint Template

    State of Minnesota Sample PowerPoint Template

    All permanent repair projects using disaster recovery funds from FHWA must follow the Delegated Contract Process. We are here to help! Remember to ask for money early and help often. Benjamin Franklin stated it well as, "Don't put off until...
  • PowerPoint Presentation

    PowerPoint Presentation

    Teach: Microelectronics (analog & digital integrated Circ., VLSI) Biomedical Engineering (instrumentation) ... measure pulse width or pulse frequency Connecting Smart Sensors to PC/Network "Smart sensor" = sensor with built-in signal processing & communication e.g., combining a "dumb ...