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Grade 44 thth Teacher Directions Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Reading 12 Selected Response Items 4 Constructed Response Items Writing 1 Brief Write 1 Write to Revise a Text Writing w/integrated language 1 Write to Revise Language/Vocabulary 1 Write to Edit or Clarify Sequential Steps toward Standard Mastery 44 thth QuarterOne One Quarter PrePreAssessment Assessment Reading: Literature Targets 1 Standards Key Details RL.4..1 RL.4.3 (can move to a DOK of 3) 2 Central Ideas RL.4.2 DOK 1-2 2 Reading: Informational Targets Standards 8 Key Details RI.4.1 9

Central Ideas RI.4.2 3) RI.4.3 (can move to a DOK of DOK 1-2 2 Note: There may be more standards per target. Only circled standards are assessed. Writing Targets Standards DOK 6a Brief Opinion Write W.4.1a, W.4.1b, W.4.1c, W.4.1d, W.4.8 3 6b Write-Revise Opinion W.4.1a, W.4.1b, W.4.1c, W.4.1d, W.4.8 2 8 Language-Vocabulary Use L.4.3.a, L.4.6 1-2 9 Edit and Clarify L.4.2.c 1-2 All elementary ELA assessments were reviewed and revised in June of 2015 by the following amazing and dedicated HSD K-6th grade teachers. Deborah Alvarado Lincoln Street Ko Kagawa Minter Bridge Linda Benson

West Union Jamie Lentz Mooberry Anne Berg Eastwood Sandra Maines Quatama Aliceson Brandt Eastwood Gina McLain TOSA Sharon Carlson Minter Bridge Teresa Portinga Patterson Deborah Deplanche Patterson Judy Ramer Consultant Alicia Glasscock Imlay Sara Retzlaff McKinney Sonja Grabel Patterson Jami Rider Free Orchards Megan Harding Orenco Kelly Rooke Free Orchard Renae Iversen TOSA Angela Walsh Witch Hazel Ginger Jay Witch Hazel Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 3 Order at HSD Print Shop http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ Order at HSD Print Shop WebSubmissionForms.aspx http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ WebSubmissionForms.aspx

Directions The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform instructional decision making. All students should move toward taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies. It is not the intent of these assessments to have students guess and check answers for the sake of finishing an assessment. If that seems the case, please scaffold to gain a true understanding of student ability, noting when and what accommodations were needed . Connecting Assessment to Classroom Instruction How do the assessments connect to classroom instruction? Assessment is not an isolated event. The HSD assessments are an extension of classroom instruction. In the classroom, assessment is on-going and monitors progress toward standards mastery. Assessment Components as a Routine Classroom Practices Assessment Components Instructional Components Pre-Assessments Standard DOK Level Use the DOK Leveled Learning Progression Tasks to monitor standard mastery. 50% Literary and 50% Informational Text Students have equal access to both text types. Grade Level Content-Rich Text All students read grade-level text, content rich text (with scaffolds as needed). Standard Academic Vocabulary Content-Domain Vocabulary. Ask questions using the standards vocabulary as well as the content domain vocabulary. Text Dependent Questions Ask text-dependent questions from the standards DOK level. Selected and Constructed Responses Students have many opportunities to answer selected extended or constructed responses. Reading for Meaning Assess understanding using never before seen text (although the theme or topic should be grade-level friendly or familiar) and reading rubrics. Note-Taking Students take notes as they read to identify the central or main idea and its supporting details. SBAC Reading/Writing Rubrics Use SBAC rubrics to access reading/writing. Read to Write Evidenced-Based Model Students read, discuss and write about a topic using evidence from the text to support inferences, conclusions and generalizations.

Write and Revise Students revise brief texts, correct grammar and language/vocabulary in context and write brief texts (brief write rubrics should be used). Performance Tasks Students read, write, discuss and research a topic guided by a central insight or goal throughout a unit(s) of study with fully defined criteria, culminating in a final product or performance task. The final product can be a full composition, speech (using SBAC Rubrics) or other product meeting all criteria. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Determining Grade Level Text Grade level text is determined by using a combination of both the CCSS new quantitative ranges and qualitative measures. Example: If the grade equivalent for a text is 6.8 and has a lexile of 970, quantitative data shows that placement should be between grades 4 and 8. Common Core Band Flesch-Kincaid The Lexile Framework 2nd - 3rd 1.98 - 5.34 420 - 820 4th - 5rd 4.51 - 7.73 740 - 1010 6th 8th 6.51 - 10.34 925 - 1185 9th 10th 8.32 - 12.12 10.50 - 1335 11th - CCR 10.34 - 14.20 11.85 - 1385 Four qualitative measures can be looked at from the lower grade band of grade 4 to the higher grade band of grade 8 to determine a grade level readability. Rate your text from easiest to most difficult between bands. 4 Qualitative Factors Beginning of lower (band) grade End of lower (band) grade

Beginning of higher (band) to mid End of higher (band) grade Purpose/Meaning Structure Language Clarity Language Overall Placement The combination of the quantitative ranges and qualitative measures for this particular text shows that grade 6 would be the best readability level for this To see more details about each of the qualitative measures please go to slide 6 of: text. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Not suited to band Pre-Assessment and Learning Progressions The pre-assessments are unique. They measure progress toward a standard. Unlike the Common Formative Assessments which measure standard mastery, the pre-assessments are more like a base-line picture of a students strengths and gaps, measuring skills and concepts students need along the way, in order to achieve standard mastery. END of Beg. of QTR QTR Example of a Learning Progression for RL.2.1 Pre-Assessments Measure Adjustment Points (in purple) CFA RL.2.1 grade-level standard assessment. After the pre-assessment is given, Learning Progressions provide informal formative assessment below and near grade-level tasks throughout each quarter. Throughout DOK 1 - Ka Recall who, what, where, when, why and how about a story read and discussed in class. DOK - Kc Use and define Standard Academic Language: who, what, where, when, why, and how; ask, answer, questions, key

details DOK 1 - Cd Connect the terms who to characters; where and when to setting; what and how to sequence of events. DOK 1 - Cf Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why and how questions about key details in a text. the QTR DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Student understands that key details help tell who, what, where, when, why and how. DOK 2 - Ck Uses key details to identify who, what, where, when, why and how about a story not read in class. DOK 2 -Cl Finds information using key details to answer specific questions about a new story. Standard Mastery RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text So what about a post-assessment? There is not a standardized post-assessment. The true measure of how students are doing along the way, is assessed in the classroom during instruction and classroom formative assessment. For this reason The CFAs are not called post-assessments. The CFAs measure the end goal, or standard mastery. However, without the pre-assessments, how will we know what our instruction should focus on throughout each quarter? Learning Progressions: are the predicted set of skills needed to be able to complete the required task demand of each standard. The learning progressions were aligned to Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix.

The pre-assessments measure student proficiency indicated on the boxes in purple (adjustment points). These points are tasks that allow us to adjust instruction based on performance. For instance, if a student has difficulty on the first purple adjustment point (DOK-1, Cf) the teacher will need to go back to the tasks prior to DOK-1 Cf and scaffold instruction to close the gap, continually moving forward to the end of the learning progression. There is a Reading Learning Progression checklist for each standard in each grade that can be used to monitor progress. It is available at: http://sresource.homestead.com/Grade-2.html Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 6 Quarter One Reading Literature Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this preassessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall or refer to specific details or examples in a text when asked. DOK 1 - Kc Define - Understand the meaning standard academic language words/terms: details, examples, refer, explicit, draw inferences DOK 1 - Ka Recall basic details from a story, drama or poem that was discussed in class. DOK 1 Ka Recall or retell specific details about a character, setting or event in a story or drama (discussed in class). DOK 1 Kc Define standard academic language theme, drama, poem, summarize, details text/passage/s tory/selection DOK 1 Kc

Define standard academic language terms: character, character traits, setting, event, story, drama, specific details, thoughts, words and actions. DOK 1 - Cd Identify or describe character, setting, key events and conflict in a text. DOK 1 - Cf Answers who, what, when, where and how questions referring to details or examples found explicitly in the text (focus on literary elements). NOT ASSESSED DOK 1 - Cf Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about the characters, setting, events and problemsolution of a story, drama or poem. DOK 1 Cd Identify a Identify specific key characters events thoughts, and the words and setting actions. of each event in a story or drama. DOK 2 - Ch Identifies the theme of a story, drama or poem. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 1 Ce Describe (using

descriptive words) a characters thoughts, words and actions. Describe (using descriptive language) a story or dramas setting. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Ch Conceptual Development Asks or answers questions about details in a text (demonstrating an understanding that details and examples can provide information explicitly found in the text) DOK 2 - Ci Summarize the events of a story, drama or poem with key details from the text. DOK 1 Cf Students answer who, what, when, where or how indepth questions specific about a characters traits. DOK 2 - Ch Explain how or why a characters actions impacted or influenced an event. DOK 2 - Ci Summarize the text using key details (to show an understanding of key details).

DOK 2 - Cj Draws basic inferences (not too implicit) using details and examples from the text. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Cl Locates specific central ideas (key details) that support a theme in a story, drama or poem. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Cl Locate indepth specific details in a story or drama to support an implicit understanding of a character, setting or event. DOK 2 - Cl Draws and explains inferences in the text using key details and examples as evidence. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret from a new text (not read in class) which key details in the text are evidence of a common theme, message or purpose. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - ANp Categorize (graph or list) common important details about a characters

traits that impact or influence event outcomes or development RL.4.1Standard RL.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Standard RL4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. DOK 3 - Cu When asked questions about a character, setting or event student draws on specific text details as supporting evidence. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Standard RL.4.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a characters thoughts, words, or actions). SELECTED RESPONSE Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 7 Quarter One Reading Informational Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this preassessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Answer questions about

details or examples in an informational text previously read in class. DOK 1 - Ka Recall or locate key details from an informational text read and discussed in class. DOK 1 Ka Locate or recall basic facts in a historical, scientific, or technical text read and discussed in class. DOK 1 - Kc Understand the meaning of the words/terms standard academic language: details, examples, refer, explicit, draw inferences DOK 1 - Cf Answers who, what, when, where and how questions about details or examples found explicitly in the text. NOT ASSESSED DOK 1 - Kc Define (understand meaning of) standard academic languageterms: theme, key details, main idea, summarize, informational text terms: articles, reports, howto books, reference books, etc... DOK 1 - Cf Answers who, what, when, where and how questions about scientific, technical, historical and informational texts. DOK 2 - Ch

Conceptual Development Asks or answers questions about details in a text demonstrating an understanding that details and examples can provide information explicitly found in the text. DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Explain how key details support the main idea using examples from a text. DOK 2 - Cj Draws basic inferences (not too implicit) using details and examples from the text. DOK 2 - Cl Locates information that is explicitly found in the text or for drawing inferences. SELECTED RESPONSE SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 Ci Summarize the events of a text or passage (article) using the key details as a guide. DOK 2 - Ck Determine the main idea of a text. SELECTED RESPONSE SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - Cl Locate explicitimplicit details in the text that support the main ideas or generalizations about a main idea. DOK 1 - Kc

DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ch DOK 2 Cj DOK 2 Ck DOK 2 ANs DOK 3 - Cu Describe what happened in a historical, scientific, or technical text (based on specifically asked questions) NOT ASSESSED Explain why an event happened based on specific information in a historical, scientific, or technical text (cause and effect). Make basic inferences in informational text about what may happen and why using specific information. Identify main ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information in a historical, scientific, or

technical text. Explain ideas using specific information from a historical, scientific, or technical text. SELECTED RESPONSE Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Define terms (standard academic language): events, procedures, ideas, and concepts, historical, scientific and technical. SELECTED RESPONSE Standard RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. DOK 3 ANz Analyze the interrelationship between an event in a historical text, analyzing what happened and why (continue for procedures, ideas or concepts). CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Connect events to historical text.

Connect procedures to a technical text. Connect ideas or concepts to a scientific text. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Standard RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. 8 A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RL.4.2: 2 Point Short Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #7 (prompt): What lessons can be learned from this myth? Use examples and details from the text to support your answer. Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence for the prompt should include what lesson or lessons can be learned from the myth with supporting evidence in the form of examples and/or details. Specific identifications (supporting details) for lessons learned could include the lesson of (1) listening to your parents, (2) dont take dangerous chances and (3) any other lesson that can be supported by explicit textual references. Full Support (other details) could include (1) what Daedelus told Icarus about the sun, (2) Icarus flying too close to the sun, (3) the outcome of Icarus decision. The student gives a proficient response stating a specific lesson or lessons learned from the myth with examples or details supporting each. 2 1 0 Icarus and his father Daedelus escaped prison by flying out of the prison using wax wings Daedelus made. Daedelus told Icarus the wings would melt if he flew too close to the sun. Icarus did not listen to his father and flew too close to the sun. His wings melted and he fell into the sea. The lesson from this example is to listen to your parents. Another lesson is that when you do dangerous things youve been warned that something bad can happen. The student gives a partial response stating a specific lesson or lessons learned from the myth but without examples or details supporting each. The boy in the story fell into the water because he didnt listen to his dad. The student does not give a response stating a specific lesson or lessons learned from the myth.

If I could fly I would be really careful. Toward RL.4.2 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret from a new which key details in the text are evidence of a common theme, message or purpose. 9 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RL.4.3 3 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #8 (prompt): What do Icarus actions tell about him? Use details from the text to support your answer. Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence should include responses that specifically describe Icarus personality based on inference or reasoning due to his actions in the text. This is a DOK-3 question. Reasoning is going beyond the obvious yet supported by textual inferences. Specific identifications (supporting details) could include these specific actions that infer Icarus personality/character, such as: (1) Icarus forgot what his father said or did not listen which could imply that he was careless,(2) Icarus liked to take dangerous chances and (3) Icarus did not respect his father. Full Support (other details) to support the personality traits specifically identified could be (1) the absence in the story to say if Icarus helped his father build the wings and (2) that it would be assumed Icarus knew the sun was hot where he lived but didnt seem to care. The student gives a proficient response by stating specific actions of Icarus that could be interpreted or reasoned as indications of his personality traits as well as an explanation of the students reasoning. 3 2 1 0 Icarus father made wings of wax. The myth did not say if he helped his father make the wings. Then his father warned him about how wax melts in the sun. I think Icarus probably already knew this because he had lived there for a long time. If his father had to warn him, perhaps his father didnt trust Icarus own decision making skills. When Icarus chose not to listen and flew close to the sun, it showed that Icarus wasnt serious about listening to his dad and usually did what he wanted anyway. Based on these examples I believe Icarus was not wise. The student gives a partial response by stating specific actions of Icarus that could be interpreted or reasoned as indications of his personality traits and a brief explanation of the students reasoning. The boy in the story didnt like to listen. His dad told him to be careful and Icarus was not careful. He was not a good listener. The student gives a minimal response about Icarus actions but without explaining the reasoning. Icarus flew by the sun and fell into the sea. The student gives no response to Icarus actions. You can get hurt if you fall into the water. Toward RL.4.3 DOK 3 - Cu When asked questions about a character, setting or event student draws on specific text details as supporting evidence. 10 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond

A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RI.4.2: 2 Point Short Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #15 (prompt): What is the main idea of this passage? Support your answer with details and examples from the text. Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence when referring to the main idea students should state in some form how and why Edison created many inventions from the time he was a child until he died. Specific identification (supporting details) could include specific things he invented, such as: (1) the phonograph, (2) the electric light, (3) a stock-ticker machine and (4) a vote recorder. Full Support (other details) that support Edison as an inventor could include (1) Edisons curiosity and intelligence (i.e., being able to educate himself, (2) experimenting even when he worked other jobs, (3) his patents and (4) how his inventions improved the quality of life all over the world. The student gives a proficient response by providing evidence of the main idea of the passage and uses specific examples from the text as well as details about (supports) each example. 2 This story is about a man that created many important inventions. His name was Thomas Edison. He was very curious as a little boy and very smart. He educated himself and only went to school for a few months. When he got his first job he experimented with inventions. He kept experimenting as he grew up. Thomas Edison invented the phonograph, vote recorder, and even a stock ticker! Thanks to Edison we have electric light! He made the world a better place. The student gives a partial response by providing some evidence of the main idea of the passage and some details to support the response. 1 0 Thomas Edison was an inventor. He made many things. He liked to make things even when he was a little boy. He worked many hours to invent stuff! It helped people all over the world. Electric light is a good example of one of his inventions. The student provides no evidence of the main idea of the passage. Thomas Edison was famous and very smart. Toward RI.4.2 DOK 2 - Cl Locate explicit-implicit details in the text that support the main ideas or generalizations about a main idea. 11 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RI.4.3 3 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #16 (prompt): Describe the relationship between Thomas Edisons many hours of work and his success as an inventor. In your response, use details and examples from the story that support your description. Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence should state in some form that Edison worked long hours which resulted in Edisons being able to create a vast

number of inventions. Details should consistently refer to the idea of his work hours and intensity or commitment. Specific identifications (supporting details) could include (1) that his wife often told him when to eat and sleep, (2) Edisons own reference to being a two-shift man and (3) his habit of working even in his spare time. Full Support (other details) could include how being partially deaf kept conversations short so he could work more. The student gives a proficient response by describing how working many hours enabled Edison to create more inventions as well as details to support this statement. 3 2 1 0 I believe Thomas Edison was a great inventor for many reasons. Mainly, he was a hard worker and worked 16 hours a day. He referred to himself as a two-shift man (which meant he worked two jobs each day)! He was also very intense. He would concentrate on his work so much his wife sometimes had to tell him when to eat and sleep! Even in his spare time Thomas Edison experimented. The result of his hard work and effort paid off. He invented 1200 things! I dont think he would have been as successful if he had not worked or cared about his work so much . The student gives a partial response by briefly describing how working many hours enabled Edison to create more inventions as well as some details to support this statement. Thomas Edison worked many long hours. Sometimes he worked 16 hours a day. He worked so hard he had time to make many inventions. Even when he had other jobs he was still inventing ! The student gives minimal response by describing how Edison worked hard, but no details to support the response. Thomas Edison worked hard to make many inventions. The student gives no description of how Thomas Edison worked many hours to become a successful inventor. If you want to be an inventor you have to do it all the time. Toward RI.4.3 DOK 3 ANz Analyze the interrelationship between an event in a historical text, analyzing what happened and why (continue for procedures, ideas or concepts). 12 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Note: Brief Writes should take no longer than 10 minutes. Brief writes are scored with a 3 point rubric. Longer writes and/or full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension. Brief Write Rubric Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Writing Standard W.4.1a Opinion Writing Target 6a Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details Question Prompt #17: Write a brief paragraph stating your opinion of Daedalus as a father. Provide details to support your reasons. Scoring Notes: Gives essential elements of a complete interpretation of the prompt which would include a specific opinion statement of Daedalus as a father including a reason supported by sufficient details. Addresses many aspects of the task and provides sufficient relevant evidence to support the reason of the opinion statement using details found explicitly in the text. The details supporting the opinion statement are dependent upon the statement. An example could be an opinion that Daedalus was smart because (1) he was an inventor and (2) he invented wings that could fly. Another opinion might be that Daedalus was caring because (1) he made wings so both he and his son could escape, (2) he warned his son to be careful and (3) he was sad when his son fell into the sea. Yet another opinion statement could be that Daedalus didnt do enough for his son because (1) he didnt watch his son enough to see that he was flying too close to the sun and (2) he could have flown down and searched for his son in the sea. This last opinion is the least supported. Is focused and organized, consistently addressing the purpose, audience, and task which is providing reasons to support an opinion. Includes sentences of varied length and structure as needed to express the opinion adequately. Student gives a proficient response by stating a definite opinion (essential element) about Daedalus as a father supported by reasons (many aspects) specific to the opinion and consistently addressing the purpose (focused and organized).

3 2 1 0 My opinion of Daedalus is that he was a good and caring father. Daedalus made wings for his son to help him escape from prison. A good father tries his best to take care of his children. He also warned his son to be careful and not fly too close to the sun. A caring father warns his children when there is danger. When his son fell into the sea Daedalus was sad. Only a father who cares would be sad to see something bad happen to his child. Student gives a partial response by stating a definite opinion (essential element) about Daedalus as a father supported by partial reasons (many aspects) specific to the opinion but does not consistently address the purpose (focused and organized). I think Daedalus was a very smart father because he could invent wings. Inventors have to be really curious like Benjamin Franklin was. He was a good inventor too. Student gives a minimal response by stating a vague opinion (essential element) about Daedalus as a father but not supported by reasons (many aspects) specific to the opinion. Daedalus was not a very good dad or maybe he just forgot to warn his son. Student gives a no opinion (essential element) about Daedalus as a father. One time my dad and I went fishing. That was being a really good dad. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 13 Grade 4, Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key Question 1 Which sentence best summarizes what Daedelus knew could happen to Icarus? Toward RI.4.1 DOK-2 Ci B Question 2 Based on the beliefs of that time, why does the author state that people did not know how very far away the sun is? Toward RL.4.1 DOK-2 Cl C Question 3 Which title would best summarize the theme in this myth? Toward RL..4.2 DOK-2 Ch B Question 4 Which key detail supports the central idea of the myth A Proud Flight ? Toward RL.4.2 DOK-2 Cl D Question 5 Which is the best description of the setting in A Proud Flight? Toward RL.4.3 DOK-1 Ce B Question 6 What does the myth imply about Daedelus' character? Toward RL.4.3 DOK-2 Cl B Question 7 Literary Constructed Response RL.4.2 Question 8 Literary Constructed Response

RL.4.3 Question 9 Why was Edison able to build his first shop in Newark, New Jersey? Toward RI.4.1 DOK-2 Cj D Question 10 Which statement is not supported by information in the text? Toward RI.4.1 DOK-2 Cl B Question 11 Which statement best summarizes why Thomas Edisons inventions were important? Toward RI.4.2 DOK-2 Ci B Question 12 What is the main idea of this text? Toward RI.4.2 DOK-2 Ck A Question 13 Thomas Edison attended school for only two months. Why was he so successful with so little schooling? Toward RI.4.3 DOK-2 Ch D Question 14 Which sentence best supports the fact that Thomas Edison was able to create so many inventions? Toward RI.4.3 DOK-2 ANs A Question 15 Informational Text Constructed Response RI.4.2 Question 16 Informational Text Constructed Response RI.4.3 Write and Revise Question 17 Brief Write W.1b Question 18 Brief Write for Revision Which is the correct way to reorder the sentences so that the opinion piece is in logical order? W.4.1a (organization) A Question 19 Choose a word to replace natural that could also work in the text. L.4.3.a, L.4.6 C Question 20 Which sentence correctly combines these sentences into a compound sentence? L.4.2.c C Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 14 Grade

44 thth Student Copy Pre-Assessment Quarter 1 Name ____________________ Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 15 Grade Level: 2.6 Lexile Measure: 560L Mean Sentence Length: 9.21 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.67 Word Count: 350 A Proud Flight Center for Urban Education, DePaul University 2005 http://teacher.depaul.edu Long ago, people looked to the sky and saw birds fly. They wondered if there was a way they could fly like birds. People made up myths about flying. A myth is a story that has imaginary people and places in it. A myth that people in Greece made up was about a young man. The young man was called Icarus. In the story, he and his father, Daedalus, were imprisoned by an evil man. They were kept on an island. They could not escape because there were high walls. The island was surrounded by water. His father was an inventor. He invented wings made from bird feathers. He used wax to get them to stick to a frame shaped like a wing. They would use the wings to escape. Because they were made with wax, the wings could melt if they got hot. So Daedalus warned his son not to fly close to the sun. At that time, which was hundreds of years ago, people did not know how very far away the sun was. The story comes from Greece, where the sun feels very hot in summer. You probably guessed what happened next. Daedalus and Icarus used the wings to escape. They flew over the walls. They flew away from the island. They were flying across the sea. But Icarus forgot what his father had warned him about. He forgot to stay away from the sun. There were no clouds. The sun shone brightly. It melted the wax. The feathers fell off the wings. They would no longer support him in the air. So he fell to the sea. Daedalus was sad to see his son fall into the sea. But he could not help him. He knew this could happen. That was why he had tried to tell his son how dangerous it was to fly close to the sun. In Greece, many times people told myths to educate other people. There are lessons to learn from this myth. Do you know what they are? Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 16 1. Which sentence best summarizes what Daedelus knew could happen to Icarus? A. He made wings of wax. B. Daedelus warned his son not to fly close to the sun. C. Icarus forgot what his father had warned him about. D. Icarus and Daedelus made wings to escape prison. Toward RL.4.1 DOK 2 - Ci Summarize the text using key details (to show an understanding of key details). 2. Based on the beliefs of that time, why does the author state that people did not know how very far away the sun was? A. Daedelus did not want his son to fly too close to the sun.

B. Their wings could take them many places. C. People in Greece thought it was possible to fly too close to the sun. D. The sun was very hot in Greece in the summer. Toward RL.4.1 DOK 2 - Cl Draws and explains inferences in the text using key details and examples as evidence. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 17 3. Which title would best summarize the theme in this myth? A. Ways to Make Wings of Wax B. The lessons from Daedelus C. How to Escape from Prison D. The Experience of Icarus Toward RL.4.2 DOK 2 CH Identifies the theme of a story, drama or poem. 4. Which key detail most supports the central idea of the myth A Proud Flight ? A. Icarus father was an inventor. B. Wax wings are not safe. C. The feathers fell off of Icaruss wings. D. Icarus forgot to listen to his father. Toward RL.4.2 DOK 2 - Cl Locates specific central ideas (key details) that support a theme in a story, drama or poem. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 18 5. Which is the best description of the setting in A Proud Flight? A. People in Greece often made up myths. B. The setting was a prison with high walls on an island surrounded by water. C. People wanted to fly like birds. D. The setting was close to a burning sun. Toward RL.4.3 DOK 1 Ce Describe (using descriptive language) a story or dramas setting. 6. What does the myth imply about Daedelus' character ? A. He was very skilled at making wax wings. B. He was a caring father. C. He made wings because the walls of the prison were high. D. He could not help his son. Toward RL.4.3 DOK 2 - Cl Locate in-depth specific details in a story or drama to support an implicit understanding of a character, setting or event. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 19

7. What lessons can be learned from this myth? Use examples and details from the text to support your answer. Toward RL.4.2 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret from a new text which key details in the text are evidence of a common theme, message or purpose. 8. What do Icarus actions tell about him? Use details from the text to support your answer. Toward RL.4.3 DOK 3 - Cu When asked questions about a character, setting or event, student draws on specific text details as supporting evidence. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 20 ThomasAlva AlvaEdison Edison Thomas Grade Level: 8.5 Lexile Measure: 890L Mean Sentence Length: 14.04 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.61 Word Count: 379 Thomas Alva Edison lit up the world with his invention of the electric light. Without him, the world might still be a dark place. However, the electric light was not his only invention. He also invented the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and over 1,200 other things. About every two weeks Edison created something new. Thomas A. Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, on February 11, 1847. His family moved to Port Huron, Michigan, when he was seven years old. Surprisingly, he attended school for only two months. His mother, a former teacher, taught him a few things, but Edison was mostly self-educated. His natural curiosity led him to start experimenting at a young age with electrical and mechanical items at home. When he was 12 years old, he got his first job. He became a newsboy on a train that ran between Port Huron and Detroit. He set up a laboratory in a baggage car of the train so that he could continue his experiments in his spare time. Unfortunately, Edisons first job did not end well. He was fired when he accidentally set fire to the floor of the baggage car. Edison then worked for five years as a telegraph operator, but he continued to spend much of his time on the job conducting experiments. He got his first patent in 1868 for a vote recorder run by electricity. However, the vote recorder was not a success. In 1870, he sold another invention, a stock-ticker, for $40,000. A stock-ticker is a machine that automatically prints stock prices on a tape. He was then able to build his first shop in Newark, New Jersey. Thomas Edison was totally deaf in one ear and hard of hearing in the other, but thought of his deafness as a blessing in many ways. It kept conversations short, so that he could have more time for work. He called himself a "two-shift man" because he worked 16 out of every 24 hours. Sometimes he worked so intensely that his wife had to remind him to sleep and eat. Thomas Edison died at the age of 84 on October 18, 1931, at his estate in West Orange, New Jersey. He left numerous inventions that improved the quality of life all over the world. Online resource site for the Improving Reading Comprehension Using Metacognitive Strategies (IRCMS) program Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 21

9. Why was Edison able to build his first shop in Newark, New Jersey? A. He had more free time because he was fired from another job. B. He inherited a building after someone in his family died. C. He found an investor willing to buy him a building. D. He made money when he sold an invention. Toward RI.4.1 DOK - 2 Cj Draws basic inferences (not too implicit) using details and examples from the text. 10. Which statement is not supported by information in the text? A. Thomas A. Edison was born in Milan, Ohio. B. Edison got his first job when he was ten years old. C. Edison worked for five years as a telegraph operator. D. Thomas Edison died at the age of 84. Toward RI.4.1 DOK - 2 Cl Locates information that is explicitly found in the text or for drawing inferences. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 22 11. Which statement best summarizes why Thomas Edisons inventions were important? A. Thomas Edison was always inventing something. B. Thomas Edison left many inventions that improved how people live. C. Thomas Edison invented the electric light. D. Thomas Edison was always curious. Toward RI.4.2 DOK 2 Ci Summarize the events of a text or passage (article) using the key details as a guide. 12. What is the main idea of this text? A. Thomas Edison was interested in science and invented many important things. B. Thomas Edison could not keep a job and kept getting fired. C. Thomas Edison worked day and night on his experiments. D. Deaf people make good inventors because they can focus better than hearing people. Toward RI.4.2 DOK 2 Ck Determine the main idea of a text. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 23 13. Thomas Edison attended school for only two months. Why was he so successful with so little schooling? A. His mother taught him a few things. B. He worked as a telegraph operator. C. He worked so much he sometimes forgot to eat or sleep. D. Thomas Edison was mostly self-educated and curious. Toward RI.4.3 DOK 2Ch Explain why an event happened based on specific information in a historical, scientific, or technical text (cause and effect).

14. Which sentence best supports the fact that Thomas Edison was able to create so many inventions? A. Edison usually worked about 16 hours per day. B. Edison spent too much time working on inventions. C. Edison is the most famous American inventor. D. Edison was not a good employee. Toward RI.4.3 DOK 2 ANs Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information in a historical, scientific, or technical text. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 24 15. What is the main idea of this text? Support your answer with details and examples from the text. Toward RI.4.2 DOK 2 - Cl Locate explicit-implicit details in the text that support the main ideas or generalizations about a main idea. 16. Describe the relationship between Thomas Edisons many hours of work and his success as an inventor. In your response, use details and examples from the text that support your description. Toward RI4.3 DOK 3 ANz Analyze the interrelationship between an event in a historical text, analyzing what happened and why (continue for procedures, ideas or concepts). Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 25 17. Write a brief paragraph stating your opinion of Daedalus as a father. Provide details to support your reasons. Brief Write, W.4.1b, stating reasons to support an opinion, Target 6a 18. Read the paragraph below. Which is the correct way to reorder the sentences so that the opinion piece is in logical order? W.4.1a Target 6b (1) Without it there are many things we could not do. (2) I think electricity has changed all our lives. (3) We would be using candles instead of light bulbs! (4) Finally, everyday tasks would become much harder. (5) First, we would not be able to keep food in a refrigerator. \ A. 2, 1, 5, 3, 4 \ B. 1, 5, 3, 2, 4 ` \

C. 4, 2, 1, 5, 3 ` D. 2, 1, ` 3, 4, 5 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 26 19. Read the paragraph below. Language /Vocab. Standard: L.4.3.a, L.4.6 His natural curiosity led him to start experimenting at a young age with electrical and mechanical items at home. Choose a word to replace natural that could also work in the text. \ ` A. odd B. strange C. normal D. abnormal 20. Read the sentences below. Edit - Language Standard: L.4.2.c The wings would no longer support him in the air. He fell into the sea. Which sentence correctly combines these sentences into a compound sentence? \ ` A. The wings would no longer support him in the air, and he fell into the sea. B. The wings would no longer support him in the air, but he fell into the sea. C. The wings would no longer support him in the air, so he fell into the sea. D.

The wings would no longer support him in the air, then he fell into the sea. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 27 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions! Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 28 Student Scoring Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was not correct. Literary Text 1 I can use key details to summarize a text. RL.4.1 2 I can use key details to infer. RL.4.1 3 I can identify the theme of a story or drama. RL.4.2 4 I can use key details or ideas to locate a specific theme. RL.4.2 5 I can describe a storys setting. RL.4.3 6 I can locate key details to determine an implicit understanding of a character. RL.4.3 7 I can locate and identify key details that provide supporting evidence of a theme, message or lesson. 8 I can use key details to answer questions that required reasoning about a character, setting or event. RL.4.3 2 RL.4.2 3 2 1 1 0 0

Informational Text 9 I can make inferences using details from the text. RI.4.1 10 I can locate information found in the text. RI.4.1 11 12 I can summarize important events in the text. RI.4.2 13 I can explain what happened and why. RI.4.3 14 I can tell what information best answers a question. RI.4.3 15 I can locate details to support an idea of generalization RI.4.2 16 I can analyze a concept that explains why things may happen. RI.4.3 I can determine the main idea of a passage. RI.4.2 2 3 2 1 1 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 0 0 29 Reflection Page 1st minute Something I did well on. 2nd Minute Something that was new to me or I need more practice with 3rd Minute Something I dont understand. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 30

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