Strategies to Complete the Updated Process

Strategies to Complete the Updated Process

THIRA/SPR Overview and Updated Methodology National Homeland Security Conference July 9, 2018 Presenters Name June 17, 2003 Purpose Review how the THIRA/SPR fits into the bigger picture of preparedness Explain how communities can use their THIRA/SPR data to drive or inform other preparedness activities Provide an overview of the updated Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA)/Stakeholder Preparedness Review (SPR) methodology Presenters Name June 17, 2003 2 Overview 2018 THIRA/SPR Methodology Update What are the updated reporting requirements for all communities? Why did FEMA make changes to the methodology? How will these changes benefit THIRA/SPR stakeholders? THIRA/SPR and Community-Wide Preparedness What is FEMAs strategic mission? What is the National Preparedness Goal? What is the National Preparedness System (NPS)?

How can my THIRA/SPR fuel the NPS? What is the THIRA/SPR? Presenters Name June 17, 2003 2 THIRA/SPR and National Preparedness Presenters Name June 17, 2003 4 The National Preparedness Goal The National Preparedness Goal (the Goal) is the cornerstone of the National Preparedness System (NPS) A secure and resilient Nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk The Goal outlines five mission areas and 32 core capabilities that define preparedness The NPS describes a whole community process employed to build, sustain, and deliver the core

capabilities to achieve the Goal Presenters Name June 17, 2003 5 Mission Areas: Categories used to organize the core capabilities and national preparedness activities Core Capabilities The Five Mission Areas Prevention Protection Intelligence and Information Sharing Interdiction and Disruption The 32 Core Capabilities Screening, Search, and Detection Forensics and Attribution Access Control and Identity Verification Cybersecurity Physical Protective Measures Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activitie s

Supply Chain Integrity and Security Mitigation Response Recovery Planning Public Information and Warning Operational Coordination Community Resilience Infrastructure Systems Long-Term Vulnerability Critical Transportation Economic Recovery Reduction Risk and Disaster Environmental Response/ Health and Social Resilience Health and Safety Services Threats and Hazards Fatality Management Services Housing Identification Fire Management and Natural and Suppression Cultural Resources Logistics and Supply Chain Management Cross-cutting Core Capabilities:

Three Core Capabilities span across all five mission areas Mass Care Services Mass Search and Rescue Operations On-Scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement Core Capabilities: The 32 distinct activities needed to address the greatest risks facing the Nation Operational Communications Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services Situational Assessment Presenters Name June 17, 2003 5 THIRA/SPR and the NPS The THIRA/SPR sets a strategic foundation to put the NPS into action Presenters Name June 17, 2003

7 THIRA/SPR Basics at a Glance Submission Cycle: Due By: Stakeholder Preparedness Review (SPR) Every three years Annually December 31st Identify community-specific risks and determine the capability needed to address those risks Purpose: Required For: Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) Estimate current capability, gaps in capability levels, and approaches to addressing those gaps States and territories receiving Homeland Security Grant

Program (HSGP) grants Urban areas receiving Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) grants Tribes receiving Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program (THSGP) grants While the THIRA/SPR is required for these grant recipients, communities of all types can complete a THIRA/SPR Presenters Name June 17, 2003 8 2018 THIRA/SPR Methodology Update Presenters Name June 17, 2003 9 THIRA/SPR Methodology Overview FEMA has updated the THIRA/SPR methodology and is beginning implementation in 2018 Over the past five years, FEMA has collected feedback from communities on how to improve the value of the THIRA/SPR FEMA gathered this input primarily during technical assistance workshops, case studies, and after action discussions with communities In 2017, FEMA used this feedback to develop three preliminary options for updating the THIRA/SPR methodology FEMA engaged with over 150 community representatives during technical assistance workshops to gather input on these initial options

Seven communities tested methodology changes and provided feedback to inform the final version of the new methodology States, Territories, and UASIs will all complete the same process Tribes will also complete the same process, but only for some core capabilities Presenters Name June 17, 2003 10 2018 Tribal Reporting Requirements FY18 THSGP recipients must complete the THIRA/SPR for the following Response, Recovery, and cross-cutting core capabilities: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Infrastructure Systems Mass Care Services Mass Search and Rescue Operations On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement Operational Communications Operational Coordination Planning Public Information and Warning Presenters Name

June 17, 2003 11 Updated THIRA/SPR Cycle FEMA is currently implementing the revised THIRA/SPR methodology In 2019, the THIRA will move to a three-year reporting cycle The planned requirements for states, territories, and urban areas from 2018-2022 are as follows: 2018: Complete the THIRA/SPR for the cross-cutting, Response, and Recovery core capabilities 2019: Complete the THIRA/SPR for all core capabilities (Year 1 of 3) 2020: Update the SPR (Year 2 of 3) 2021: Update the SPR (Year 3 of 3) 2022: Complete the THIRA/SPR for all core capabilities (Year 1 of 3) As mentioned in the previous slide, tribes are only required to complete the THIRA/SPR for eight of the cross-cutting, Response, and Recovery core capabilities in 2018 Presenters Name June 17, 2003 12 THIRA/SPR Methodology Presenters Name June 17, 2003

13 THIRA Step 1: Identify Threats & Hazards Communities identify threats and hazards based on impacts and likelihood Communities identify their threats and hazards of greatest concern Communities identify all threats and hazards that they believe could pose the greatest challenge to at least one core capability Enter Threats and Hazards Threat Category: Flooding Natural Threat Type: Hurricane / Typhoon Category 3 Hurricane Terrorism: Active Shooter at Mall No Hazmat Release THIRA Step 1 Presenters June 17,Step 2003 3 THIRA StepName 2 THIRA

14 THIRA Step 2: Add Context and Impacts Communities develop context descriptions and estimate impacts, which they will use to inform capability targets Communities describe the threats and hazards they identified, explaining how they may affect the community and challenge the core capabilities Communities identify the impact a threat or hazard may have on a community using standardized impact language Context Description Standardized Impacts (Partial List) A Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 127mph and wind gusts approaching 140 mph makes landfall at 0900. The hurricane system leaves damage across the state affecting government infrastructure, homes, and businesses. Communications, water, and power generation infrastructure sustained significant damage. Survivors evacuate their homes and require shelter. Roadways are blocked by debris limiting responder access. What source(s) did you use to develop the context description and calculate your impacts? Real-world events SMEs Response plans Models and tools Exercises

Other: _______ Free-Text: You can use this field to describe the sources you used in greater detail. THIRA Step 1 Impact Category Number of evacuees Number of customers without power Number of businesses closed Number of hazmat release sites Number of people requiring sheltering Number of fatalities Number of structure fires Number of affected healthcare facilities Number of people requiring rescue Number of animals affected Number of jurisdictions affected Number of people requiring medical care Number (#) (#) (#) (#) 29,000 (#) (#) (#) (#)

(#) (#) (#) Presenters June 17,Step 2003 3 THIRA StepName 2 THIRA 15 THIRA Step 3: Set Capability Targets Communities will set targets on a three year cycle to establish a consistent baseline for assessment FEMA will provide communities with standardized target statements, which provide the framework for capability targets for each core capability Communities will fill out the community-specific metrics in the standardized target statements Communities are required to set capability targets, which capture the level of capability they realistically seek to build to Communities will also identify the threat or hazard that most stresses each target and describe why Capability Target (Mandatory) Maximum Requirement (Optional) Within 48 hours of an incident, provide emergency sheltering for 20,000 people; maintain sheltering operations for 14 days

Within 48 hours of an incident, provide emergency sheltering for 29,000 people; maintain sheltering operations for 21 days Most Stressful Threat/Hazard: Hurricane / Typhoon THIRA Step 1 Presenters June 17, 2003 3 THIRA Step Name 2 THIRA Step 16 SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities (1/2) Using the same language as their targets, communities annually identify and update their current capabilities Communities identify and describe how their capability has changed over the past year, broken down by capability lost, sustained, and built FEMA will provide communities with guidance on how to include resource considerations in the free-text fields How Has Your Capability Changed Over the Past Year? Est. Beginning Capability Shelter 15,000 people Capability Lost Capability Sustained

Capability Built Lost capability to shelter 3,000 people Sustained capability to shelter 12,000 people Built the capability to shelter 1,000 people Planning Training Planning Training Planning Est. Current Capability Shelter 13,000 people Training Exercises Exercises Organization Describe how you built, sustained,

and lost Organization capability overExercises the last year,Organization and the role played by mutual aid Capability LostEquipment Communities describe the causes of their capability loss (attrition, retirements, etc.) Equipment Capability Sustained Communities describe the actions/investments they made to sustain their capability Capability Equipment Built Communities describe the actions/investments they made to build their capability SPR Step 1 Mutual Aid Communities explain how mutual aid agreements may affect their current capability Presenters Name SPR

Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR Step 17 SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities (2/2) Communities provide additional information to contextualize their quantitative assessment Communities rate their confidence in the accuracy of their data, and identify the sources of that confidence Communities also elaborate on their data confidence and provide other desired context in a free-text box Provide Additional Context for Capability Assessment What is your confidence in the accuracy of your capability assessment? Higher Confidence Lower Confidence 1 2 3 4

5 What sources did you use to estimate your capabilities? Real-world events Other reports SMEs Exercises Modeling or tools Other If selecting Other please elaborate: ____________________ Free-Text Description (Optional) Our range of capability to shelter is likely between 12,000-17,000 people. Sheltering in the more rural region of the state is less reliably available so we selected the low end of the range for our current capability. SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 SPR Step 3 18

SPR Step 2: Identify Capability Gaps Communities quantify their capability gaps and provide additional context aligned with each POETE area Communities determine their capability gaps, identify relevant POETE area(s), and assign a priority rating Communities then describe the gaps in each area using free-text fields Where possible, FEMA will encourage communities to identify and describe gaps involving specific resources Planning Target Current Capability Capability Gap Gap Priority 20,000 13,000 7,000 Medium Communities describe their capability gaps in each POETE area P Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys planning gaps O Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys organization gaps Eq

Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys equipment gaps T Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys training gaps Ex Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys exercise gaps SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR Step 19 SPR Step 2: Address Gaps Once gaps are identified, communities identify POETE areas in which they plan to address those gaps and/or sustainment needs Communities then describe their intended approaches in each area using free-text fields Communities will also identify the timeframe over which they plan to address their gaps Communities describe how they plan to address their gaps and sustainment needs

P Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys approach for planning O Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys approach for organization Eq T Ex Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys approach for equipment Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys approach for training Free Text: You can use this free-text box to describe, generally, the communitys approach for exercises Over what timeframe do you intend to implement these approaches? Timeframe: 1-3 years SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR Step 20

SPR Step 3: Capability Sustained Capability Sustained Over Last Year Against Capability Target: If your community has not sustained this capability over the last year select N/A and skip to the next question. Sustained capability to shelter 12,000 people N/A To the best of your knowledge, select all funding sources used to sustain this capability over the past year: Select up to two primary funding sources in the first column. A primary funding source is defined as any one source that contributed approximately 50% or more of the total funding used to sustain this capability. Then select as many additional funding sources in the second column as applicable. An additional funding source is defined as any one source that contributed less than approximately 50% of the total funding used to sustain this capability. Funding Source Type and Name Non-Federal Sources FEMA Preparedness and Mitigation Grants State, territory, or tribe Local Private-sector or non-profit AFG CCTA CTP EMPG HMGP FMA

IBSGP IPR NSPG OPSG PDM PRPA PSGP SHSP THSGP TSGP UASI Other: Name and describe funding source Primary Funding Source Additional Funding Source Not a Known Funding Source (Approx. 50% or more) Select maximum two (Less than approx. 50%) Select all that apply (0%) Default response

(Other free text entry) SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 3

SPR Step 21 SPR Step 3: Capability Built Capability Built Over Last Year Against Capability Target: If your community has not built this capability over the last year select N/A and skip to the next question. Built capability to shelter 2,000 people N/A To the best of your knowledge, select all funding sources used to build this capability over the past year: Select up to two primary funding sources in the first column. A primary funding source is defined as any one source that contributed approximately 50% or more of the total funding used to build this capability. Then select as many additional funding sources in the second column as applicable. An additional funding source is defined as any one source that contributed less than approximately 50% of the total funding used to build this capability. Funding Source Type and Name Non-Federal Sources FEMA Preparedness and Mitigation Grants State, territory, or tribe Local Private-sector or non-profit AFG

CCTA CTP EMPG HMGP FMA IBSGP IPR NSPG OPSG PDM PRPA PSGP SHSP THSGP TSGP UASI Other: Name and describe funding source Primary Funding Source Additional Funding Source Not a Known Funding Source (Approx. 50% or more) Select maximum two (Less than approx. 50%) Select all that apply (0%) Default response

(Other free text entry) SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR

Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR Step 22 SPR Step 3: Impact in a Real-World Incident Communities describe the impact that capabilities built or sustained with FEMA preparedness and mitigation grants had in real-world incidents over the past year This question is concerned with the use of grant-funded capabilities used over the past year; the grant funding can be from any year in the past Grant Impact Free-Text Box Describe how the capabilities built/sustained with FEMA preparedness and mitigation grants were used in a real-world event over the past year. (This question is completed only once, discussing capabilities sustained and built at the same time) SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR

Step 23 Adding Functional Area Gaps After completing SPR Steps 1-3 for all required targets, communities will identify gaps in functional areas not covered by the required targets Core Capability: Critical Transportation Capability Target: Within 48 hours of an incident, clear 300 miles of road affected, to enable access for emergency responders, including private and non-profit. SPR Steps 1-3 Status: Completed POETE Areas Functional Areas Planning Organization Equipment Training Functional Area(s) Covered by Standardized Target (Completed Above) Debris Removal Exercises Capability Gaps already identified and described above in SPR Step 2. Establishing Access Functional Area(s) Not Covered by Standardized Target (Identify Any Gaps Below) Evacuation Other Functional

Area(s) Reentering Affected Area Transportation Safety and Condition Assessments Delivery of Response Assets

SPR Step 1 Presenters Name SPR Step 2 June 17, 2003 3 SPR Step 24 Using the THIRA/SPR Data for Other Preparedness Activities Presenters Name June 17, 2003 25 Why is The THIRA/SPR Important? Communities use the THIRA to better understand their risks and determine the level of capability needed to address those risks Communities then use the SPR to estimate their current capabilities, identify gaps and their intended

approaches for addressing them, and assess the impact of relevant funding sources Communities can use their THIRA/ SPR data to support a variety of emergency management efforts, including strategic planning and response and recovery operations Presenters Name June 17, 2003 26 Response and Recovery Planning Communities can involve planners and reference plans to help: Identify threats and hazards of concern and their potential impacts Develop capability targets that align with planning factors and objectives Identify gaps related to planning, such as plans that need to be updated Communities can use THIRA/SPR data to drive planning efforts, including: Using context descriptions and estimated impacts to develop scenarios for planning efforts Referencing current capabilities during discussions about mutual aid and resource-sharing Communities can also review strategic plans to help determine potential approaches for closing identified gaps in capability Presenters Name June 17, 2003

27 Mitigation Planning Communities can use THIRA/SPR data to evaluate current mitigation capabilities and targets to determine whether plans, policies, and procedures need to be changed or updated Communities can align mitigation planning factors with standardized targets and impacts to: Ensure plans reflect potential impacts and are geared towards specific community preparedness goals Better align preparedness activities, resulting in better coordination among stakeholders and improved resilience Aligning mitigation planning with the THIRA/SPR can decrease the gap between a communities capability and requirements, as targeted mitigation efforts can result in decreased capability requirements Presenters Name June 17, 2003 28 Exercises Communities can use context descriptions and estimated impacts as a starting point for developing exercise scenarios Communities can set exercise objectives and evaluation criteria that reflect the capability targets they set in the THIRA, synchronizing planning, assessment, and exercise efforts This can help communities use exercises to track their progress towards achieving their preparedness goals Communities can also plan future exercises to focus on newly built capabilities, weaker capabilities, or specific gaps identified in the

SPR This can be useful for learning more about gaps and shortfalls, as well as validating the effectiveness of efforts to address them Presenters Name June 17, 2003 29 Continuous Improvement Communities use the continuous improvement process to identify preparedness challenges and set priorities This helps inform investments in other preparedness activities required to close gaps Communities can use THIRA/SPR data to help identify where corrective actions have been successful in building capabilities or where different approaches may be necessary Communities can use THIRA/SPR data to identify and drive increases in capability. For example: Evaluating performance in exercises or real-world incidents against capability targets established in the THIRA Using capability gaps and approaches to close gaps identified in the SPR to guide strategic planning and investments Presenters Name June 17, 2003 30 Strategic Investment and Training Communities can use capability gaps and the approaches they

identified in the SPR to address those gaps to prioritize and drive investments for building and sustaining capabilities For example, communities can use THIRA/SPR data to focus training investments on the specific training gaps theyve identified and described for different capabilities Communities also estimate the degree to which different funding sources helped build and sustain their capabilities This process can help communities think strategically about how to use their funding and consider whether they are doing so efficiently Community A identified an approach to close a gap in sheltering Community A prioritized funding sheltering training courses Community A exercised sheltering and determined that the capability to shelter had increased Presenters Name June 17, 2003 31 Supporting Communities FEMA and Federal partners use THIRA/SPR data to guide their preparedness programs and deliver support to communities The Federal government uses THIRA/SPR data to: Provide support to communities to

address gaps and sustainment needs Provide responders a better understanding of communities current capabilities and potential gaps during response and recovery efforts Guide the strategic direction of training, technical assistance, and other programs to address specific capability gaps Provide customized analysis to Federal partners that they can use to provide more tailored support to communities Presenters Name June 17, 2003 32 Assessing National Preparedness (1/2) FEMA uses THIRA/SPR data to answer questions for Congress, The White House, and other stakeholders about national preparedness: How can the Federal government help communities build and sustain capabilities? How prepared is the Nation to address its threats and hazards? How have preparedness capabilities changed over time? How are different funding sources driving changes in preparedness? What are the Nations strongest capabilities? What areas are in need of

improvement? Presenters Name June 17, 2003 33 Assessing National Preparedness (2/2) The Federal government uses THIRA/SPR data to create analytical products that analyze national preparedness National Preparedness Report (NPR) Annual assessment of trends and developments in national preparedness For example: How does THIRA/SPR data bolster key findings? Analytical tools for interagency partners to explore and analyze THIRA/SPR data Ad Hoc Reports Time-sensitive analyses to support response and recovery efforts For example: How could a forecasted disaster affect communities in its path? How can FEMA best provide proactive support? Presenters Name June 17, 2003 34 Updated Methodology Resources

Presenters Name June 17, 2003 35 Current Resources FEMA has developed several resources to assist communities in learning the updated THIRA/SPR methodology Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201, 3rd Edition Annotated THIRA/SPR Mass Care Services Planning Economic Recovery Infrastructure Systems Live and recorded webinars Examples include: THIRA/SPR Beginners Guide and THIRA/SPR Methodology deep-dives Whole Community Input Form (WCIF) Presenters Name June 17, 2003 36

CPG 201 (1/3) CPG 201 outlines the updated THIRA/SPR methodology in detail Presenters Name June 17, 2003 37 CPG 201 (2/3) Callout boxes and graphics help explain key elements of the new methodology Presenters Name June 17, 2003 38 CPG 201 (3/3) Callout boxes and graphics help explain key elements of the new methodology Presenters Name June 17, 2003 39 Annotated THIRA/SPR (1/2) The Annotated THIRA/SPR provides guidance and best practices to complete a THIRA/SPR assessment

Presenters Name June 17, 2003 40 Annotated THIRA/SPR (2/2) Red callout boxes describe best practices to consider while green callout boxes direct communities to additional resources Presenters Name June 17, 2003 41 Other Tools and Resources FEMA will also release additional tools for communities to use in completing and submitting their THIRA/SPR Aggregator Tool Aggregates WCIF responses from THIRA/SPR stakeholders Online Unified Reporting Tool (URT) Submission portal for THIRA/SPR data Still hosted on MAX.gov Once each resource is complete, FEMA will post it to the THIRA/SPR Workshop Resources page on MAX.gov CPG 201 will also be publicly available on FEMA.gov If you need additional assistance, please reach out to the THIRA/SPR Help Desk at [email protected]

Presenters Name June 17, 2003 42 Presenters Name June 17, 2003 43

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