The Formation of the U.S. and its Relationship to Utah Before ...

The Formation of the U.S. and its Relationship to Utah Before ...

The Formation of the U.S. and its Relationship to Utah Before 1847 Unit 3: Chapter 5 Passing Through the Great Basin This is a no gum class. Please dispose of it properly! 1. 2. 3. Bell Activity Pick up the new study guide and take out a blank piece of paper. Title it: Early U.S. History. Define the vocabulary words pioneer and

desolate Find the word on your orange study guide and complete the following information for the word. Find the definition using a glossary. Use your own knowledge and experience to complete the rest of the definition. 4. Where should your backpack be? Does your work look something like this? Word: pioneer My Understanding: 4 3 2 1 Definition:

Draw a picture of it: Sentence: Synonym/ Example: Antonym/NonExample: Does your work look something like this? Word: pioneer Definition: a person who is among the first to enter or settle a region. Sentence: Many pioneers moved west to find new land that they could settle and

own. Synonym/ Antonym/NonExample: Example: follower; colonizer, settler; native Pilgrims, Mormons My Understanding: 4 3 2 1 Draw a picture of it: Does your work look something like this? Word: desolate My Understanding: 4 3 2 1 Definition: Draw a picture of it:

Sentence: Synonym/ Example: Antonym/NonExample: Does your work look something like this? Word: desolate My Understanding: 4 3 2 1 Definition: barren; deserted Sentence: Jed Smith crossed the desolate Great Basin on his way back to Utah. Synonym/

Example: bleak; barren; desert Antonym/NonExample: lush, verdant; forest Draw a picture of it: What are we learning today? History Objective We will understand the development of the United States and how this led to contact with and the exploration of Utah. Behavior Work Ethic: Create useful, detailed notes

on the topic. Language Objective We will listen for details and answer questions on our guided notes. European nations competing for North America As we learn in the last chapter, Spain and France were deeply involved in the exploration of what would become the western United States. During this time, a new nation was created from thirteen English colonies in the eastern part of the continent. Jamestown

Earlier attempts at English colonization had failed. One mysterious example of this was the Lost Colony of Roanoke. The first successful English colony in North America was Jamestown in 1607. Who were some of its famous inhabitants? Reasons for settlement

Like the Spanish and French, some of the English originally came to the Americas for wealth, but as they explored the region they found it did not have wealthy civilizations. Some of the English began to think of the Americas in a different way; as a place they could settle and live. The Pilgrims

Far to the north of Jamestown, but not long after (1608), a ship called the Mayflower landed in what would become Massachusetts. The Pilgrims were among the first colonists in North America to include complete families. They were just among the first to settle in America. Many more colonists would follow, moving into lands occupied by Native Americans up and down the eastern coast.

Thirteen Colonies Over the course of the next 150 years, these and other colonies grew and developed. Eventually, Great Britain possessed 13 colonies that stretched from north to south along the east coast of the United States. Road to Revolution

But as these colonies grew, they became increasingly removed from the country that ruled them. From the shipyards of the northern colonies to the slave plantations of the south, the colonies were seeking representation in the English government. When Great Britain tried to tax the colonists to recover some of the money spent to fight the French & Indian War, some felt this wasnt right. No Taxation Without Representation was just the beginning

The colonies wanted a representative in Parliament if they were going to pay taxes for the war. This and other disputes eventually led to battles near Boston, Massachusetts in 1775. In July of 1776, the colonies declared their independence. But it would take another seven years for the colonies to win the war (1783).

A New Nation Hungry for New Land One of the disputes the colonists had with England was the English governments reluctance to allow settlers to move west. After the war ended and the new country gained some stability, settlers flooded west across the Appalachian Mountains and beyond. This westward movement from the United States would continue until the country stretched from sea to shining

sea. The Louisiana Purchase After renovating the government with a new Constitution in 1789, the Americans took every opportunity to expand the borders of the country. Under the guidance of the third president, Thomas Jefferson, the U.S. bought the vast territory of Louisiana from the French emperor, Napoleon,

who had taken the land in a war with Spain. Lewis and Clark Spain and France did not share their knowledge with the U.S. about the interior of the continent, nor did the U.S. ask them what they knew and so information from early Spanish and French explorers was not shared with the U.S. In 1804, Jefferson sent Lewis and Clark, along with their guide Sacagawea, to explore the new

Louisiana Territory. They hoped to find an easy passage to the Pacific, but instead came back with a lot of information about the interior of the continent. Write your answers in the space provided on question 17 in your guided notes. Image Response: Take a look at the picture and write what you think it means on your paper. What is happening? Who is in it? What are they doing? When is it taking place? The Politics of Expansion

This expansion continually brought the U.S. into conflicts with other nations. By 1845, the American government had expanded their control from Florida to Texas and beyond. The U.S. acquired Texas after American colonists with the help of some of the local Tejanos (Mexican colonists) created a revolution. This and other issues eventually caused the Mexican-American War. The Trail to Gaining Oregon

The U.S. was also very interested in the Oregon Territory, which was being sought by Great Britain, who controlled Canada, and Russian who had been colonizing Alaska. The U.S. presidential candidate and future president (1844), James K. Polk, threatened war with Britain to get Oregon, but really didnt want to fight. The U.S. already had a tense

relationship with the new Mexican government and war was likely. Polk didnt want to fight two wars at once. Rather than fight with Britain, the U.S. negotiated and set the border between British Canada and America where it is today. Golden California American settlers had also

gradually made their way to California, which was still a part of Mexico. Gold was discovered there in 1848 at Sutters Mill by an American. This started a flood of migration to the area. About a week after gold was discovered, Mexico ceded California and most of the western continent to the U.S. 300,000 people moved to California from the U.S. and from other countries. They were called the 49ers because they primarily came in 1849. Many of these travelers crossed through Utah to get to the California gold fields.

Manifest Destiny Many in the United States felt that it was our countrys fate, or destiny, to possess the land from east to west coast across the continent. During the 1840s this desire was given a name, Manifest Destiny. The idea behind this name was used to justify taking land from Native Americans, to call for the annexation of Texas, to cause a war with Mexico, and even to argue that the U.S. should control all of North America.

By the 1850s, the United States controlled what is now the continental U.S., with Hawaii & Alaska being added by the end of the 19th century. More explorers and pioneers With all of these acquisitions, the U.S. was eager for knowledge of these new lands. The government sent explorers and expeditions to learn about these new lands. This would pave the way

for future expansion of pioneers into many territories, including Utah. This clip summarizes how the U.S. expanded across the continent and beyond. Making Connections What do you think the Native Americans felt about Manifest Destiny? What did it mean for them? How does this idea of Manifest destiny bring new people Utah?

Now lets try making a timeline Timelines can also be helpful tools in understanding history. 1. Draw a bar to mark when, and for how long, each culture existed in Utah. Anasazi 300 B.C.-1300 A.D., Fremont 400-1300 A.D., Utes, Paiutes, Goshutes, Shoshone 1100 A.D. to present, Navajo 1620 A.D. to present. 2. Use the timelines at the beginning of each chapter in the book to fill in a year for each event at the bottom of the page. Then mark each of the events on the timeline. 0 200 400 600

800 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800

1900 This is a no gum class. Please dispose of it properly! Bell Activity Take out your study guide and answer questions 2-4 using page 84. Also take out your notes from yesterday. If you finish those questions, work on your map.

Where should your backpack be? This is a no gum class. Please dispose of it properly! Bell Activity Take out your study guide, Early U.S. History notes, and the Trails map + instructions Your word is replenish Find the word on your orange study guide and complete the following information for the word.

Find the definition using a glossary. Use your own knowledge and experience to complete the rest of the definition. Where should your backpack be? Does your work look something like this? Word: replenish Definition: Draw a picture of it: Sentence: Synonym/

Example: My Understanding: 4 3 2 1 Antonym/NonExample: Does your work look something like this? Word: replenish Definition: to replace or make complete again Sentence: Many pioneers traveling on the Overland Trails had to replenish their supplies at forts or trading posts. Synonym/ Antonym/NonExample: replace Example: deplete My Understanding: 4 3 2 1

Draw a picture of it:

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