Workforce Slides

Workforce Slides

ECAR NATIONAL STUDY OF STUDENTS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HIGHER EDUCATION, 2011 Eden Dahlstrom, Peter Grunwald, Tom de Boor, Martha Vockley October 2011 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd CONTENTS Study Overview Key Findings Technology Ownership (slides 913) Technology Use and Value (slides 1431) Institutional and Instructional Technology Competencies (slides 3240) Technology for Connecting and Relationships (slides 4144) Online Learning (slides 4547) ECAR Recommendations Source: Dahlstrom, Eden, Tom de Boor, Peter Grunwald, and Martha Vockley, with a Foreword by Diana Oblinger. The ECAR National Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2011 (Research Report). Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research, October 2011, available from http://www.educause.edu/ecar 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 2 STUDY OVERVIEW 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 3 ECAR STUDENT STUDY, 2011 RESEARCH OBJECTIVES Assess students technology ownership and use Explore how effectively instructors and institutions are using technology Understand students technology skill level Gauge students technology perceptions, attitudes, and preferences 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 4 ECAR STUDENT STUDY, 2011 SAMPLE Responses from 3,000 students at 1,179 colleges and universities provided a nationally representative sample of students

Data are weighted to match statistics from the National Center of Education Statistics for the composition of college students in the United States on the following variables: Year (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior) Institution type (public, private, for-profit) Gender Institution size Age Institution type (4-year vs. 2-year) Region Ethnicity Major of study 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 5 ECAR STUDENT STUDY, 2011 SAMPLE COMPOSITION Year Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Gender Male Female Age 1824

2534 3544 45+ Region Northeast South Midwest West Ethnicity White Black/African American Hispanic American Indian or Alaskan native Asian/Pacific Islander Other Prefer not to answer Percentage 21% 31% 25% 23% N 640 918 760 682 43% 57% 1,283 1,717 60% 23% 9% 8% 1,802 709 259 230 21% 25% 33% 21% 630 750 990 630 66% 13%

11% 1% 7% 1% 2% 1,975 398 344 30 201 37 65 Major Biological/life sciences Business, management, marketing Education, including physical education Engineering, including computer science Liberal arts and sciences/general studies Physical sciences, including math Social sciences Fine arts Other Undecided Institution Type Public Private For-profit Enrollment Less than 500 500 to 999 1,0004,999 5,0009,999 10,00019,999 20,000 or more Type A two-year or community college A four-year college or university Student Enrollment Status Full-time Part-time 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd Percentage 14% 21% 7% 7% 11% 2% 17% 6% 13% 2%

N 408 642 198 213 342 72 498 168 402 57 73% 23% 4% 2,190 691 118 1% 3% 19% 18% 24% 35% 30 90 570 540 720 1,049 37% 63% 1,110 1,890 82% 18% 2,459 541 6 KEY FINDINGS 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 7 ECAR STUDENT STUDY, 2011 KEY FINDINGS Students are drawn to hot technologies but rely on

more traditional devices. Students recognize major academic benefits of technology. Students report uneven perceptions of institutions and instructors on technology. Facebook-generation students juggle personal and academic interactions. Students prefer, and say they learn more in, classes with online components. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 8 KEY FINDING 1 STUDENTS ARE DRAWN TO HOT TECHNOLOGIES BUT RELY ON TRADITIONAL DEVICES 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 9 DRAWN TO HOT TECHNOLOGIES PREFER SMALL, MOBILE DEVICES Technology Ownership Technology 6 1 Laptop 87% 2 Printer 81% 3 DVD Player 75% 4 USB Thumbdrive 70% 5 Wi-Fi* 67% 6 5 7 12 11

1 4 3 10 4 2 8 Q1. Which of the following items do you own? Stationary gaming device 62% 8 HDTV 56% 9 Smartphone 55% 10 Digital Camera 55% 11 Webcam 55% 12 Desktop Computer 53% 13 Handheld Gaming 38% 14 Netbook 11% 15 iPad 8% *Likely interpreted by the respondent as having access to Wi-Fi 9 13 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd

66% 7 Ipod Device 1 Students Own 1 Traditional age college students (18-24) and those from households of $100K+ own more technology than their 10 counterparts. DRAWN TO HOT TECHNOLOGIES RELIANT ON TRADITIONAL DEVICES Laptop computer Printer DVD player USB Thumbdrive/portable harddrive Wi-Fi Stationary gaming device iPod HDTV Scanner NET: smartphone Digital point and shoot camera Webcam Desktop computer Other mobile/cell phone Handheld/portable gaming device DVR Blu-ray player mp3 player/music device (other than iPod) Digital video camera Digital SLR camera eReader (e.g., Kindle, NOOK) Internet-ready TV Netbook HD set top box Flip video camera iPad Internet device that attaches to TV 3D TV Other tablet Smartpen Students Own 87% 81%

75% 70% 67% 66% 62% 56% 56% 55% 55% 55% 53% 39% 38% 34% 29% 29% 27% 14% 12% 11% 11% 9% 8% 8% 7% 2% 2% 1% Q1. Which of the following items do you own? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 11 DRAWN TO HOT TECHNOLOGIES OPINIONS ON PLATFORM PREFERENCE Student Preference Institution Preference Institution has no preference 67% 28% Institution prefers students use Windows-based PCs Institution prefers students use Mac computers 5% I have no preference 10%

I prefer Windows-based PCs 65% I prefer Mac computers Institution prefers UNIX-based (including LINUX) computers 0% I prefer another platform 24% 1% Q4b. Does your college or university officially prefer you use one computing platform over another? Q4c. And, what is your preference? Do you prefer to use one platform over another? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 12 DRAWN TO HOT TECHNOLOGIES CARNEGIE CLASS DIFFERENCES Students at community colleges are more likely to own stationary technologies (e.g., desktop computers and stationary gaming and video devices), particularly in comparison to students at research institutions Students at institutions that award masters and doctorate degrees are more likely to own portable technologies (e.g., laptops, iPods, webcams, thumb drives, and Wi-Fi devices) Still, there are both mobile devices (e.g., iPads) and stationary technologies (e.g., HDTVs) for which no significant differences exist among students at institutions of different Carnegie Classifications. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 13 KEY FINDING 2 STUDENTS RECOGNIZE MAJOR ACADEMIC BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 14 ACADEMIC BENEFITS DEVICES USED FOR ACADEMICS Technology use for academics Technology Total

1 2 4 8 3 11 1 4 7 Students Use For Academics 9 1 5 2 1 0 Q1. Which of the following items do you own? Q2a. Regardless of whether you own it, which of the following have you used for at least one course or academic activity in the past year? (Owners) 1 Laptop 85% (92%) 2 Printer 79% (84%) 3 Desktop Computer 63% (78%) 4

Wi-Fi 60% (75%) 5 USB Thumbdrive 59% (74%) 6 Smartphone 37% (60%) 7 DVD Player 30% (33%) 8 iPod 23% (22%) 9 Digital Camera 21% (32%) 10 HDTV 18% (26%) 11 Webcam

17% (24%) 12 Stationary gaming device 12% (15%) 13 iPad 12% (67%) 14 Netbook 11% (70%) 15 Handheld Gaming Device 7% (13%) ( ) = use among owners 6 15 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 1 Traditional age college students (18-24) and those from households of $100K+ use15 more technology than their 15 counterparts

ACADEMIC BENEFITS CORE SOFTWARE IS CENTRAL TO SUCCESS Frequency of Use for School or Personal Purposes 24% 24% 41% Use word process... Use your college/universitys library web... 6% 9% 32% Use presentation softw... 4% 7% Use spreadshe... 7% Use a course or learning management sy... Use e-books or e-textb... Use graphics software (Photoshop, Flash, e... 8% Use web-based citation/bibliography t... Use e-portfo... Use speech recognition softw... 32% 24% 6% 6% 17% 19% 6% 13% 9% 9% 73% 57% 55% 51% 35%

15% 8% 83% 37% 25% 11% Use freely available course con... Use audio-creation soft... 29% 9% Use programming languages (C++, Java, e... 19% 23% 17% 15% Use simulations or play educational g... Use video-creation softw... 20% 5% 85% 38% 18% 96% 88% 45% 29% 27% 6% 41% 29% 9% 7% 33% 30%

28% 21% Total Less often A few times a week Once a day Several times a day 14% Q5b. Thinking about the most recent school year, how often did you do the following, whether it was for school or personal purposes? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 16 ACADEMIC BENEFITS STUDENTS VALUE SOFTWARE BASICS Value of Technology to Academic Success Percent Responding Extremely Valuable Word proces... Presentation softw... College/university's library web... E-books or e-textb... Text mes... Online forums or bulletin bo... Web-based vi... Instant mes... Programming langu... Telephone-like communication over the Inter... Web-based m... Social studying s... B Simulations or educational g... Link... E-portfo... Photo-sharing webs... Speech recognition softw... Geotagging, Geotagged environme... 25% 23% 22% 22% 16% 16% 14% 14% 13% 12% 12% 11% 10% 10%

9% 8% 8% 8% 7% 7% 6% 5% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 38% 47% 46% 45% 66% 76% Q7. How valuable are each of the following when it comes to your academic success? Please consider only your academic success when rating these technologies, not the other aspects of your life. 17 ACADEMIC BENEFITS ACCESSING RESOURCES AND EFFICIENCY Agreement with Statements about Academic Success Percent Responding Agreeing or Strongly Agreeing 59% Gives me access to a wide range of resources 23% 54% Makes it easy to track my academic progress 26% 56% Simplifies administrative-related activities such as registering for classes, paying tuition, etc.

46% 30% Helps me do my work faster 47% 27% 45% 43% 31% Makes it easier to get help when I need it 44% 29% 41% Makes college easier 41% 76% 74% 74% 74% 73% 31% 72% 28% 69% Makes learning more creative 37% 30% Better prepares me for entering the workforce 37% 29% 66% Makes learning more fun

37% 29% 66% Makes me feel more connected to whats going on at the college/university Makes coursework/lectures more engaging Enables me to reach my true academic potential Elevates the level of teaching Gives me access to experts in my field 35% 30% 35% 33% 31% 33% 67% 65% 30% 65% 30% 30% 27% 63% 61% 60% Makes me feel connected to professors and other college/university staff 31% Makes me feel connected to other students 31% Makes my academic experience more individualized/personalizes curriculum 30% 27% 57% 30% 27%

57% Makes classes more relevant to real life Q12. To what extent do you agree with each of the following statements regarding technology when it comes to your academic experience? 78% 29% Allows me to produce higher quality work Allows me to take control of my own learning 78% 30% Extends learning beyond the classroom Is an efficient way to store examples of my work 80% 22% 48% Helps me know how I am doing in a course Better prepares me for getting into graduate school Helps me think out of the box 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 82% 29% 27% 60% 58% 29% 27% 56% 29% 27% 56% Column3 4 (out of 5) 5 (out of 5)

18 ACADEMIC BENEFITS FOUR FACTORS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS Avg. Agreement with Statements Gives Students Access to Resources and Progress Reports Easy to track my academic progress Helps me know how I am doing Simplifies administrative-related activities Gives me access to resources Easier to get help when I need it Makes Students More Efficient Helps me do my work faster Allows me to produce higher-quality work Efficient way to store examples of work Makes college easier Facilitates Connecting with Others Feel connected to what's going on Gives me access to experts in my field Feel connected to other students Feel connected to professors/staff Makes Learning More Engaging and Relevant Learning more creative Learning more fun Think out of the box Individualized/personalized More relevant to real life More engaging Elevates teaching Reach academic potential 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd

Take control of own learning Extends learning beyond classroom Prepares me for the workforce Prepares me for graduate school 19 ACADEMIC BENEFITSRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TECHNOLOGIES AND BENEFITS Access to Resources & Progress Reports Laptop computer Wi-Fi Printer Document camera Wi-Fi Printer Internet device that attaches to TV Digital video camera USB drive Projector Efficiency Laptop Connecting With Others Smartphone iPad Engagement and Relevance Digital video camera Scanner Digital point and shoot camera Scanner

Internet device that attaches to TV Interactive whiteboard iPhone/ smartphone Student clickers/ student response systems iPad eReader Student clickers/ student response systems Mp3 player 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd Digital cameras DVD player Document camera DVR Desktop computer Webcam 20 ACADEMIC BENEFITS COMMUNICATION TOOLS - MASS ADOPTION Frequency of Use for School or Personal Purposes E-mail 75% Text message 74% Use Facebook 58% Download or stream web-based videos (YouTube, etc.) Read Wikis (Wikipedia, course wiki, etc.)

20% 12% Read blogs Use telephone-like communication over the Internet Watch podcasts or webcasts Participate in online chats, chat events, webinars 13% 11% 7% Tagging/bookmarking/liking 7% 6% 9% 23% 11% 23% 21% 6% 17% 24% 8% 6% Use social studying sites Participate in online virtual worlds 12% 6% 15% 5% 18% 7% 8% 25% 25% 12% 9%

31% 25% 23% 72% 68% 59% 53% 49% 43% 42% 12% 17% 7% 81% 79% 43% 29% 9% Access Internet content via a TV (Apple TV, Roku) Use Geo-Tagging, Geo-Tagged environments 14% 11% 85% 50% 20% 15% Use other social networking websites (MySpace, etc.) Use LinkedIn 28% 32% 9% 85% 70% 33%

33% Use Twitter Contribute to Wikis (Wikipedia, course wiki, etc.) 27% 15% 6% 20% 23% 25% 13% Contribute to blogs Post videos to a video-sharing website (YouTube, etc.) 22% 30% 5% 18% Use photo-sharing websites (Flickr, Snapfish, Picasa, etc.) Play online multi-user computer games for recreation 11% 37% Total Less often A few times a week Once a day Several times a day 18% 15% Q5a. Thinking about the most recent school year, how often did you do the following, whether it was for school or personal purposes? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 93 90% 18% 26% 12% 15%

9% 8% 11% 33% 35% 27% Download or stream web-based music 14% 14% 12% Instant message (Gchat, Facebook chat, AIM, etc.) Use online forums or bulletin boards 13% 6% 21 ACADEMIC BENEFITS A BLIZZARD OF MESSAGES Frequent e-mail users (75% of students) send or receive an average of 25 e-mails a day. Frequent texters (74% of students) send or receive an average of 84 text messages a day. Frequent Facebook users (58% of students) log into and/or check Facebook 13 times a day. Frequent Twitter users (11% of students) read or post 112 tweets a day. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 22 ACADEMIC BENEFITSSMARTPHONESNOT JUST FOR COMMUNICATION Ways Smartphones Are Used for Academic Work (Among Users) n= 1,122 E-mailing profe... Checking gr... Texting other students about course... Looking up info on Internet outside of ... E-mailing other students about course... Accessing course websites or sy... Looking up info on Internet in c... As a timer or time management de...

Listening to music while doing cours... Taking pic... Collecting data for clas... To access a social networking web... Accessing library reso... Registering for co... Conducting research for papers/presenta... Accessing financial aid inform... Texting profe... Making textbook purch... Learning about locations you're in/vis... As a source of additional help or tut... Posting information or images on the Int... Writing papers or other clas... Ordering transc... Making charts or other visual... 66% 62% 61% 59% 57% 45% 45% 42% 40% 37% 28% 28% 24% 22% 22% 21% 19% 16% 15% 15% 14% 12% 7% 5% Opportunities exist for universities and students to take greater advantage of smartphone technology when it comes to administrative activities, such as ordering transcripts, purchasing textbooks, accessing financial aid information, and registering for courses. Q11. You said you own an iPhone or smartphone. Which of the following are ways you use your iPhone or smartphone for your academic work? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd

23 ACADEMIC BENEFITS TOP APPS FOR MOBILES Types of Apps Used Most For Coursework and other University-Related Activities (Among smartphone and tablet users) n= 1,230 Calculator or mathematical equation Dictionary or Thesaurus Search tool Calendar or time management Social networking News Writing, note-taking, presentation Educational review Reading Foreign language or translators Study tool Video player Music Spreadsheet University specific Entertainment Travel Drawing or sketching Location-based Sports App one of my professors recommended Multi-player online games All other games Other None of the above 52% 49% 43% 36% 27% 25% 24% 23% 23% 20% 19% 19% 16% 15% 12% 7% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 11%

2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd Q10b. Which of the following types of mobile or tablet apps do you use for coursework or other college/universityrelated activities? Please do not include any apps that you only use for personal, non-academic purposes. 24 ACADEMIC BENEFITSTHE ONE WEBSITE STUDENTS CANT LIVE WITHOUT 36% 2% 3% 11% 2% 2% 8% An additional 88 websites/online resources were mentioned by less than 2% of the sample. Q15. When it comes to your success as an undergraduate, what is one website or online resource you couldnt live without? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 25 ACADEMIC BENEFITS VALUE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE ACCESS Wi-Fi access is instrumental to student success, and students want access from everywhere on campus. Value of Technology for Academic Success Percent Responding Extremely Valuable (Among users and those whose instructors use) N = bases vary Laptop computer Wi-Fi Printer USB Thumbdrive/portable harddrive Desktop computer Projector Netbook

Document camera or digital overhead projector Interactive whiteboard (e.g., SMART board) Net: Smartphones eReader (e.g., Kindle, NOOK) Other mobile/cell phone Scanner Digital SLR camera 3D TV Internet device that attaches to TV HD set top box Other tablet - not an iPad iPad Digital video camera DVR mp3 player/music device (other than iPod) Internet-ready TV Student clickers or student response systems Webcam Smartpen HDTV Digital point and shoot camera DVD player iPod Stationary gaming device Blu-ray player Flip video camera Handheld/portable gaming device 81% 78% 73% 64% 57% 53% 46% 41% 35% 33% 33% 32% 31% 28% 28% 27% 26% 26% 24% 23% 23% 23% 22% 22% 21% 21% 20% 19% 19%

18% 16% 16% 15% 14% 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd Q4a. And, how valuable are each of the following when it comes to your academic success, (whether its your own personal device, or something your instructor or university uses as a part of your academic experience)? Please consider only your academic success when rating these technologies, not the other aspects of your life. 26 ACADEMIC BENEFITSTECHNOLOGIES VALUED ALIGN WITH INSTRUCTORS USE Instructors Use Projector 69% Laptop computer 67% Desktop computer 65% Wi-Fi 44% Printer 42% Document camera or digital overhead projector 37% USB Thumbdrive/portable harddrive 36% Clickers or student response systems 32% Interactive whiteboard (e.g., SMART board) 28% DVD player 26% Scanner 21% Net: Smartphones 17% Webcam 11% Netbook 8% iPad 7% Other mobile/cell phone 6% Digital point and shoot camera 6% Digital video camera 6% HDTV

6% iPod 5% Internet device that attaches to TV 4% There is a wide range of Smartpen 4% Digital SLR camera 3% technologies with potential Flip video camera 2% educational benefits that Internet-ready TV 2% arent being used yet. mp3 player/music device (other than iPod) 2% Other tablet (e.g., Galaxy Tab, Xoom, etc.) - not an iPad 2% eReader (e.g., Kindle, NOOK) 2% Stationary gaming device 1% DVR 1% Blu-ray player 1% Handheld/portable gaming device 0% Q2b. Youve told us about all the different kinds of technological devices you own HD set top box 0% and use for academic work. Now tell us, which of the following your instructors 3D TV 0% used to teach, mentor and communicate with you in the past year? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 27 ACADEMIC BENEFITS MANY LACK CONFIDENCE IN THEIR SKILLS Student Technology Skill Level Percentage Responding 4 or 5 My skill level meets my needs (out of 5) Word processors 69% College/universitys library website 50% Course or learning management system 52%

Presentation software 16% 23% 16% 47% E-books or e-textbooks 44% Online chats, chat events, webinars 42% Spreadsheets 21% 17% 18% 36% 23% Photo-sharing websites 31% Simulations or educational games 30% 13% 43% Web-based citation/bibliography tools 30% 12% 42% Podcasts and webcasts 16% 27% 13% Graphics software 20%

13% Freely available course content 20% 9% 29% Internet content via a TV 21% 8% 29% Online virtual worlds 22% 7% 29% 19% 9% 28% Geo-Tagging, Geo-Tagged environments 20% 6% 26% 17% 8% 25% Video-creation software 15% 10% 25% Audio-creation software 15% 9% 24% E-portfolios 15% 8% 23% Programming languages 13%

73% 68% 68% 61% 60% 59% 47% 40% 33% Social studying sites Speech recognition software 85% 7% 20% 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd Q6. How comfortable do you feel with your ability to use each of the following? 28 ACADEMIC BENEFITS E-MAIL HITS THE TOP OF WISH LIST Wish Instructor Used More Often E-mail Course or learning management system E-books or e-textbooks Presentation software Online forums or bulletin boards Online chats, chat events, webinars College/university library website Web-based videos Freely available course content Video-sharing websites Word processors Podcasts and webcasts Text message Spreadsheets Facebook Tagging/bookmarking/liking Simulations or educational games Blogs Wikis Web-based citation/bibliography tools Social studying sites Instant message Telephone-like communication over the Internet Graphics software Video-creation software Online multi-user computer games

Programming languages E-portfolios *Only items mentioned by at least 5% of students are shown Web-based music 39% 32% 31% 27% 21% 20% 20% 19% 19% 18% 18% 17% 16% 16% 15% 15% 15% 14% 13% 12% 11% 9% 9% 9% 7% 6% 6% 6% 5% Why Students Say they Want More (From open-end responses) "I wish instructors e-mailed more so that students and teachers could communicate easier, faster, and more efficiently." "Blackboard makes viewing things in your class easier and more convenient." "E-books are cheaper than regular hardbound textbooks, easier to carry around, and more accessible all the time." "I find PowerPoint presentations easy to follow & understand." Q8A. Which things do you wish your instructors used more?

2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 29 ACADEMIC BENEFITSCARNEGIE DIFFERENCES IN TECHNOLOGY VALUE Students in community colleges are generally less likely to engage in many technology applications and activities than students at institutions of other Carnegie Classifications. Students in community colleges tend to find non-core technologies more valuable than do students in doctoralgranting institutions. These technologies include multiuser games, educational simulations and games, speech recognition software, and, to a lesser extent, virtual worlds, geotagging, and graphics software. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 30 ACADEMIC BENEFITSCARNEGIE DIFFERENCES IN TECHNOLOGY VALUE Across a broad range of technologies, students at institutions that award doctorate degrees are more comfortable with their skills than students at community colleges and, in many cases, students in institutions that award bachelors and masters degrees. Students at institutions that award doctorate degrees tend to find a number of core communication, course, and social networking tools more valuable than their counterparts in community colleges. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 31 KEY FINDING 3 STUDENTS REPORT UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF INSTITUTIONS AND INSTRUCTORS ON TECHNOLOGY 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 32 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY EFFECTIVE, FREQUENT, AND SEAMLESS USE The strongest predictors of how students rate their institution in its use of technology

their instructors effective use of technology their instructors use of technology frequently enough the seamless integration of technology into their courses These three predictors alone accounted for approximately 54% of the variance in students perceptions of their institutions effectiveness in using technology. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 33 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY NO MAGIC BULLETS Students at institutions rated as highly effective in the use of technology say they engage in about as many software activities as their peers and that their instructors use about the same number of devices in their coursework. There are no significant differences between students frequency of use of most software applications at institutions rated effective and less effective in their use of technology. Virtually no high or even moderate correlations exist between individual technologies and any of the major academic benefits of technology described earlier. Differentiating technologies, where they exist, often are mundane (e.g., printers, spreadsheets, even USB thumb drives). 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 34 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY DELIVERY OF BASIC ONLINE SERVICES Institutional Performance in Online Delivery of Services Percentage rating 4 or 5 (out of 5) Offering online course registra... 62% Making grades available on...

24% 56% 25% 47% Making transcripts available on... 46% 24% 70% Making financial aid information available on... 46% 24% 70% 32% 28% 81% Offering Library resources on... Offering textbooks for sale on... 86% 21% 53% 75% top 2 box (4/5) 4 (out of 5) 5 (out of 5) Service Not Offered Service Not Used 1%

2% -- 1% 1% 6% 4% 7% 1% 7% 6% 11% Q16. How would you rate your college/university with regards to the following online services? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 35 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY VALUE VS. EFFECTIVE USE average Used Most Effectively by Instructors Projector Technology valued most and used most effectively by professors Document camera/ digital overhead projector Wi-Fi Laptop computer Desktop computer Interactive whiteboard Internet-ready TV Valued Most for Academic Success Valued Least for Academic Success

Printer USB drive Digital SLR camera Netboo k average HDTV Windows phone DVD player Internet device that attaches to TV Other tablet Flip video camera Smartpen Clickers/response systems Scanner Blackberry eReader Webcam Digital video camera Digital Point and Shoot Android iPod Other Smart Phone iPhone mp3 player iPad Other Mobile / Cell Phone Used Least Effectively by Instructors Items with Ns below 45 are not included on this chart. Q3. How effectively did your instructors use these technologies to teach, mentor and communicate with you in the past year? Q4a. And, how valuable are each of the following when it comes to your academic success? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 36 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE VALUE VS. WISHED USED MORE Most Wish Instructor Used More Highly valued technologies students wish instructors used more Web-based videos Video-sharing websites Online chats, events, Online forums or bulletin boards webinars Freely available course content

Podcasts and webcasts Facebook Simulations or Tagging/ educational games bookmarking/ Blogs Graphics liking Web-based Social studying sites Software citation/bibliography tools Telephone like communication over Instant Message internet Online multi-user computer Programming languages E-Portfolios Web-based music Twitter Photo-sharing websites Audio-creation software Online virtual worlds Linked In Geo-Tagging Internet content via TV Other social Speech recognition software networking websites VALUE MOST VALUE LEAST average 1ST priority average Note: Students may value creative technologies less in an academic context because their instructors dont model their use. Least Wish Instructor Used More Items with Ns below 45 are not included on this chart. Q7. How valuable are each of the following when it comes to your academic success? Q8A. Which things do you wish your instructors used more? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 37 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTORS USE TYPICAL TECHNOLOGY

Instructors Effective Use of Technology Percentage responding extremely effectively (Among those whose instructors use), n=base sizes vary Projector Wi-Fi Laptop computer Desktop computer Document camera or digital overhead projector Stationary gaming device Printer HDTV USB Thumbdrive/portable harddrive Digital SLR camera Netbook Interactive whiteboard (e.g., SMART board) DVD player mp3 player/music device (other than iPod) Smartpen Blu-ray player Scanner Digital point and shoot camera Internet-ready TV Internet device that attaches to TV Other tablet - not an iPad Student clickers or student response systems Net: Smartphones Flip video camera Webcam iPod Digital video camera Other mobile/cell phone DVR iPad eReader (e.g., Kindle, NOOK) 65% 59% 58% 57% 56% 55% 54% 53% 52% 50% 48% 47% 44% 42% 41% 40% 40% 39% 38% 38% 37% 37%

35% 35% 35% 32% 31% 30% 30% 30% 29% Q3. How effectively did your instructors use these technologies to teach, mentor and communicate with you in the past year? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 38 UNEVEN PERCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Agreement with Statements about Technology Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree My institution uses the technology it has effectively 22% I know more about how to use technology than my professors 22% My instructors use technology frequently enough 20% Technology makes professors better at their job 19% My institution needs more technology 19% Technology is integrated seamlessly into my courses 19% My instructors use technology effectively 37% 29% 29% 32%

37% 11% 32% 28% 33% 24% 9% 2% 6% 14% 39% 36% 5% 14% 36% 27% 19% 8% 3% 7% 12% 33% 3% 10% 2% 1 (out of 5) My instructor requires help to get technology up and running Instructors dont know how to use technology that is available 12% 19% 34% 22% 2 (out of 5)

14% 3 (out of 5) 4 (out of 5) 8% 18% 32% 24% 5 (out of 5) 18% Q13. And how much do you agree with each of the following statements about technology, as it relates to your college experience? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 39 UNEVEN PERCEPTION OF TECHNOLOGY TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANCE OPPORTUNITIES Professors should be able to actually use the technology that is available to them. Many of my professors must enlist the help of students to get the technology up and running which wastes valuable class time. I hate that when you actually need the technology to work at our school, it never does. I'd like them to use Blackboard to give us more resources outside the classroom, to post grades, and to have discussions outside the classroom. The tools are all there, but they're not used. Professors can utilize emails a lot more to inform the class of important announcements. Videoconferencing and webcams could and should be more widely used. The technology is widely available and is easy to use, and can help bring these online classes to life and give the teacher more influence over their material. Make the technology more integrated to the learning environment and use more than just PowerPoint.

The campus needs a more reliable Wi-Fi connection, available everywhere. It's gone out repeatedly and there always seems to be new bugs every month! I would like if my college had more up-to-date technology. Finding some way to make eBooks more widely available to students would be amazing. Q14. Please describe in as much detail as you can how your college/university or professors could use technology better when it comes to providing you with the best possible college and learning experience. Please mention any additional technology that you think would be beneficial to your education, or ways to make current technology use more effective. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 40 KEY FINDING 4 FACEBOOK-GENERATION STUDENTS JUGGLE PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC INTERACTIONS 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 41 JUGGLE INTERACTIONS SOCIAL NETWORK USENOT UNIVERSAL Social Networking Activities Students Do At Least Once a Month Use a social networking site 86% Participate on online forums or bulletin boards 32% Participate in online chats, chat events, webinars 24% Participate in online fundraising/social change activities 7% Participate in geotagging activities 6% Participate in social studying activities 6%

Post music (you've created) to a music-sharing website 5% Play location-based games None of the above 3% 8% Q19. Do you do any of the following activities on a regular basis (by regular we mean at least once a month)? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 42 JUGGLE INTERACTIONS USE FACEBOOK TO COMMUNICATE Agreement with Statements about Social Networking I am comfortable using Facebook or other social networking sites to communicate with other students about coursework. 32% I like to keep my academic life and my social life separate. 30% It's important to have an online forum to communicate and interact with other students about coursework outside the classroom. 25% 26% 24% 28% Students are comfortable communicating with other students on Facebook about academics; however, they prefer 18% 14% 10% their communication with instructors to be more formal (using email for this purpose instead). 27% 14% 5% 28% 11% 8%

1 (out of 5) 2 (out of 5) A class online discussion board is better for helping me connect with other students about coursework than a social networking site like Facebook. 27% 24% 26% 3 (out of 5) 13% 9% 4 (out of 5) 5 (out of 5) Q20. How much do you agree with the following statements about the use of social networking sites such as Facebook in conjunction with your learning? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 43 JUGGLE INTERACTIONS FRIENDING BY AN INSTRUCTOR? Appropriateness of Teacher or Professor Friending You for Academic Purposes Not Appropriate 39% Appropriate 31% Neutral 30% Q21. Lets say a teacher or professor wanted to Friend you for academic purposes. Is that appropriate? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 44 KEY FINDING 5 STUDENTS PREFER, AND SAY THEY LEARN MORE, IN CLASSES WITH ONLINE COMPONENTS 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 45 STUDENTS PREFER ONLINE COMPONENTS BLEND TRADITIONAL AND ONLINE Preferred Learning Environment Seminars and other smaller classes with some online components 36%

Classes that give me the option to use as many or as few online components as I need to 22% Large lecture classes with some online components Seminars and other smaller classers with no online components 16% 10% Seminars and other smaller classes that are completely online 6% Large lecture classes with no online components 5% Large lecture classes that are completely online 5% Q17. What type of learning environment do you generally prefer? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 46 STUDENTS PREFER ONLINE COMPONENTS MIXED SIGNALS ABOUT ONLINE-ONLY Does an online course have the same educational value as an in-person course? Does your institution offer exclusively online courses? (Among those whose institutions offer online courses) n=2,395 Online courses provide equal value Yes, online courses provide equal value. Age <25 23% 25+ 40% Live 30% on-campus 18% off-campus

33% Taken an online course Yes 45% No 12% No, online courses do not provide equal value. 58% Have you taken a course entirely online? Yes 80% Yes No 10% No Don't know 12% Don't ... 65% 35% 10% Q18b. Generally speaking, do you believe a course taken only online provides an equal educational value compared with a course taken in person in a classroom, or not? Q18c. Does your institution offer any courses for which the instruction takes place exclusively in an online environment, or not? Q18d. Have you ever taken a course entirely online? 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 47 ECAR RECOMMENDATIONS 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 48 RECOMMENDATIONS Investigate your students technology needs and preferences, and create an action plan to better integrate technology into courses and help students access institutional and academic information from their

many and diverse devices and platforms. Provide professional development opportunities and incentives so that instructors can make better use of the technology they have and feel more comfortable with the technologies students find more engaging and relevant. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 49 RECOMMENDATIONS, cont. Expand or enhance students involvement in technology planning and decision making. Nail the basics. Help faculty and administrators excel at supporting students use of core productivity software and applications for academic use, including, e-mail, word processing, spreadsheets, content or learning management systems, library sites, and bibliography tools. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 50 RECOMMENDATIONS, cont. Meet students expectations for anytime, everywhere, Wi-Fi access on the devices they prefer to use. Make more and better use of technologies that students valueand those that are easily integrated into learning experiences in the shared environments in higher education (e.g., tablets, smartphones, student response systems or clickers). In many cases, these are the technologies that distinguish highly rated from less highly rated institutions on the effective use of technology today. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 51 RECOMMENDATIONS, cont. Meet students expectations for joining the consumer migration to e-content.

Establish/refine social media policies utilizing information about how your students use social media to enhance their educational experience. Use technology in more transformative ways, such as participatory and collaborative interactions and for higherlevel teaching and learning that is engaging and relevant to students lives and future plans. Use technology more to extend learning beyond the classroom. 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 52 RECOMMENDATIONS, cont. Give students different options for interacting with the institution and with instructors, including standard and more forward-leaning options. Leverage the value that students find in instructional relationships, using face-toface, online, and blended strategies. Move strategically toward blended/hybrid learning environments to meet students preferred styles of learning. Offer many different ways for students to engage in learning using technology and meet differentiated needs (e.g., for different student populations and preferences, academic disciplines, and coursework). 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 53 FOR MORE INFORMATION ECAR National Study of Students and Information Technology in Higher Education, 2011 http://www.educause.edu/library/ERS1103 Eden Dahlstrom ECAR Senior Research Analyst [email protected] 2011 EDUCAUSE. CC by-nc-nd 54

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