Year 11 Success Evening

Year 11 Success Evening

ENGLISH LITERATURE GCSE All students will study GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature (four exams: two for Literature and two for Language). Both subjects are now treated equally: they are as important as each other and there are no coursework or controlled assessment components. All students sit the same exams regardless of English set. How to Succeed: Students need to listen carefully in lessons and ensure their notes are comprehensive. At home they should practise regularly. Completing their homework is essential. If they or you as parents are not sure, please ask for help, or find out further information through the following:

Specifications and texts, which will be available as an AQA digital anthology for home use: aqa.org.uk Spelling: spellzone.com General writing skills: http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/ New GCSE BBC Bitesize - interactive revision: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zckw2hv English resources by the late Andrew Moore (ignore the legacy Specification details) http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/ GCSE Pod: www.gcsepod.com Increased demand of new specifications The new specifications are more demanding in four ways: Content Wide variety of poetry (both studied and unseen),

19th century novel, substantial whole texts - no short stories (English Lit) Examination end of course only; no controlled conditions assessments Assessment less scaffolding; Grading mid grade of new 9 to 1 scale (grade 5) to be a half to two-thirds of a grade higher than that required for the old grade C. Grade 4 is currently considered a pass. English Literature GCSE - AQA Paper 1 Shakespeare Macbeth and 19th Century novel A Christmas Carol. Charles Dickens

Paper 2 Modern Text Blood Brothers Poetry Anthology Poetry Unseen One written exam. Externally assessed 1 hour 45 minutes 64 marks 40% of GCSE One written exam. Externally assessed 2 hrs 15 minutes 96 marks 60% of GCSE Section A: Shakespeare Macbeth

One question with two bullet points: Write about and analyse an extract Write about the text as a whole 30 marks for content, 4 marks for quality of writing Section B: 19th Century Novel A Christmas Carol. One question with two bullet points: Write about in detail and analyse an extract Write about the text as a whole 30 marks Section A: Modern text Blood Brothers Answer one essay question from a choice of two 30 marks for content, 4 marks for quality of writing Section B Poetry Anthology

One comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from the Anthology. 30 marks Section C Unseen Poetry Two questions. One on an unseen poem. 24 marks One comparing this unseen poem to another unseen poem 8 marks This is a challenging course, however there are many cross-overs between English Language and English Literature and they are being assessed on the same skills over the majority of the texts.

Points to note: Every essay should be written the same way (with the exception of the poetry) regardless of the text The terminology must be learnt for English Language as well as English Literature and it does not have to be complicated. Students can paraphrase if they forget the precise quote, as long as they are referring to specific sections of the texts Each text has a limited number of characters and themes, therefore students only need to focus on these and not try and remember everything It is not a memory test. The highest grades will be awarded to the students who do the most insightful and detailed analysis Literature should be an accessible and enabling subject for every student.

Assessing all texts in a fair and transparent way. Making use of a range of assessment strategies so that closed book and un-tiered aspects of the new regulations are not barriers to learning. AQA take the same approach to the assessment of all texts - when you approach a literary text you approach it the same way, no matter which text it is. Our students need to be able to look at ANY text and discuss its didactic nature, regardless of genre. English Literature: Assessment Objectives 1-4 AO1: Read, understand and respond to texts maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal response

use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations AO2: Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate. AO3:Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. AO4:Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. A0s in Question Macbeth AO2 Analysis of Language The adjective bright suggests the building blinds all others around it and gives it an

element of power and control. The adjective gaunt personifies the building with connotations of death and illness. Then, as it was so bright that it hurt my eyes to go on staring at it, I looked up ahead and saw, as if rising out of the water itself, a tall, gaunt house of grey stone with a slate roof that now gleamed steel-like in the light. Sibilance to convey the sounds of the water and the moving carriage. Also alliteration of G a sinister sound that underpins the description

The simile, steel-like suggests the qualities of steel - namely coldness and hardness - both negative attributes General Points: How to help The exams are closed book in English Literature. The more the student reads and revises them, the more confident they will feel in the exam. 1. Encourage them to read and re-read these texts. 2. Encourage them to create revision mind maps of characters or themes by selecting key quotes from 3. Discuss their understanding with them 4. Stress that they dont need to understand every word of a poem or

of Shakespeare in order to understand the text as a whole. 5. A small amount of revision once a day is better than hours on one day. I cant revise for English Literature! 1. Select a passage from a fiction book and then identify 4 key things about the setting / main character / plot etc. 2. Look at the structure of your text. Where does the author the start, are there any repeated moments/ ideas? Is the book/ text cyclical ? Why ? 3. Explore titles of texts how are they relevant/ important/ misleading? 4. List common spellings you know you get wrong and learn them by rote. Especially characters names, places etc. 5. Learn literary devices writers use and practise identifying them.

6. Once youve identified a device can you make notes of why the writer may have used it what effect does it have on the reader? (how does it make them think or feel?) 7. Practise planning a response to a question what quotes will you use? Which chapters/ acts are most relevant? Which characters will I focus on to support my idea? 8. Research the context of texts how has the time it was written affected the way it was written? READ! I cant revise for English Literature! 1. Explore the titles of poems - what do they tell you? 2. Annotate and make notes on how a poem is structured (line length, stanza length) how does it support the meaning/ ideas in the poem. 3. Learn literary devices writers use and practise identifying them 4. Once youve identified a device can you make notes of why the writer may have used it

what effect does it have on the reader? (how does it make them think or feel?) 5. Identify the mood of the poem, select words and phrases to support your idea. Does the mood change? 6. Highlight all of the verbs in a poem and discuss how they affect the meaning 7. Which poems from the anthology relate to each other? How? Why? READ! A revision task involving parents! 1. Both read the same page/ section of text. 2. Discuss what it is about. Get a sense of whether they have understood everything. 3. Give your opinion of a theme or character and encourage them to agree / disagree 4. Get them to give their opinion and challenge them to prove it. Can

they select quotations to support their ideas? 5. Read other extracts/ sections from the text how has the character/ mood/ theme changed? Why? Thank you for coming Any questions? [email protected]

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