Your Second Rule of Cinematography

Your Second Rule of Cinematography

Your Second Rule of Cinematography Recommended viewing: D4Darius click or paste link below Darius Britt says exactly what I will. https://youtu.be/cIvGRytmRaw The Rule of Thirds A compositional process to place objects in the frame. Creates more energy, tension, and interest.

Better than centered subjects. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds States that a frame is divided with two horizontal and two vertical lines Items of interest should be

placed on or around the vertices. Vertices are called Power Points or Crash Points Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds This is what will separate you from everyone else. Someone else will do this:

What is the most important thing in this shot? What should it be? Dead Space Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds If the eyes are the most important part of a shot,

how do we get them to BE the most important part of the shot? Dead Space Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Mean

The Golden Mean defines a spiral pattern that shows up repeatedly in Nature, in everything from a nautilus sea shell to a sunflower, to the spiral form of the galaxy itself; it occurs in more natural subjects than you could imagine, making it no coincidence. First the math, then Ill blow your mind.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Mean The Golden Mean is defined by a mathematical sequence of numbers known as the Fibonacci sequence. By definition, the first two Fibonacci numbers are 0 and 1, and each remaining number is the sum of the previous two. So the sequence is:

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, .... The ratio of each pair of consecutive numbers approximates phi, or the number 1.618. (5 divided by 3 is 1.666, 8 divided by 5 is 1.60...) By the 40th number in the series, the ratio has stabilized at 1.618, accurate to 15 decimal places. Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin explores the Fibonacci numbers. https://youtu.be/SjSHVDfXHQ4

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Rectangle Whats a this ratio look like graphically? We draw a rectangle whose ratio of the length of the side to the other is the golden ratio of 1.618:1.

The Golden Rectangle Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Rectangle Know what has roughly the same ratio of sides? Isnt that weird?

But, this ratio appears everywhere in nature(mindblowing coming soon) The 35mm film plane. 1 1.61 Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds

The Golden Ratio We start with the Golden Mean: 1.618:1. Gives us the Golden Rectangle. We need the Golden Spiral (The Fibonacci Spiral or nautilus shape). The Spiral is what appears all over the place in nature. Your Second Rule of Cinematography

The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) We draw a rectangle that is divided into squares. The ratio of the length of the side of a larger square to the next smaller square is the golden ratio of 1.618:1. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds

The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) A Fibonacci spiral is formed by connecting the arcs (quarter circles) joining opposite corners of the squares Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral)

A Fibonacci spiral is formed by connecting the arcs (quarter circles) joining opposite corners of the squares Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds

The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over

the place. Microscopic view of the ovary of an Anglerfish. Nikon's It's a Small World Competition. www.dailymail.co.uk Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral

(the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Spiral aloe.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral

(the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Sunflower. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral)

This is the shape that appears all over the place. All pinecones display a Fibonacci sequence. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral)

This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral)

This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place.

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral

(the Fibonacci Spiral) This is the shape that appears all over the place. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) And where it starts is way back here ancient Greece

The Greeks supposedly built and painted using the Golden Ratio all the time (not proven in DaVincis writings, though). Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral) And where it starts is way back

hereancient Greece The Greeks supposedly built and painted using the Golden Ratio all the time (not proven in DaVincis writings, though). Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral (the Fibonacci Spiral)

And where it starts is way back here ancient Greece The Greeks supposedly built and painted using the Golden Ratio all the time (not proven in DaVincis writings, though). Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds The Golden Spiral

(the Fibonacci Spiral) And where it starts is way back here ancient Greece The Greeks supposedly built and painted using the Golden Ratio all the time (not proven in DaVincis writings, though). The Rule Of Thirds

Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds States that a frame is divided with two horizontal and two vertical lines. Horizontal first Your Second Rule of Cinematography

The Rule of Thirds Whats the most important part of the actor? Where do we put them now? Automatically makes a better shot! Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds

But, remember the lines go both ways, and this is what dovetails into the Relational Power Theory. Screen is also divided vertically. Your Second Rule of Cinematography The Rule of Thirds

Put the two together and this is what you get. Nicely composed shots. Your Second Rule of Cinematography https://www.companyfolders.com/blog/rule-of-thirds-graphic-design The Rule of Thirds WHY?

Studies say this is how we view any piece of media. But why? Again, its ingrained. Purpose of Rule of Thirds Remember this picture? Dead space needs to become active space.

How do we do it? Purpose of Rule of Thirds Rule of Thirds does three things: Creates active space, thus creating balance in the frame. Creates space for other actors to enter.

Gives actors room to look, speak, and move. Purpose of Rule of Thirds Lead Room If a character is looking frame left, then he should be placed frame right. This makes the framing comfortable because the

subject is looking at the open space in front of him. This open space is called lead room or lead space. If the actors were frame left, looking frame left, then the empty space would be behind them. This doesn't feel right because they would be

looking at the edge of the frame. The proximity to the frame would generate a claustrophobic undertone that could upset some viewers. Notice that when two shots of two actors in different sides of the screen are intercut together, the audience surmises that the actors are looking to one another, regardless of where

they are. (this would be funny to shoot! and show!) The Rule Of Thirds vs. The Golden Ratio Watch The Kings Speech (or look at the stills) Watch use of negative space. Is the rule of thirds

really thrown out the window? https://youtu.be/tiIspoQnPEA The Rule of Thirds vs. The Golden Ratio https://youtu.be/9CiS3SU4lk0

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